Disc brake setup

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dan0512, Apr 30, 2005.

  1. dan0512

    dan0512 New Member

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    Hello, I've been thinking of instaling a disc brake on the fork. I was taking a look at my options, and here the list of what I need, even though I need help filling it-

    Avid 185mm mech. disc brake
    36 Hole front hub (m525, m756, any others)
    Spokes?
    Anything else (185mm adapter, nipples?)

    I've been searching for a long time, and can't seem to find a shop that stocks both the brakes and hub at a fair price, I don't want to spend more than $120. BTW, the fork is an RST Capa TL w/ 51mm mount. I'm not an aggresive rider, but would like more overall braking powet than the V-brake can offer.

    Dan
     
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  2. dan0512

    dan0512 New Member

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    bumpie bumpie
     
  3. Conniebiker

    Conniebiker New Member

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    I don't see a purpose to using the 185 mm rotors in that application. For all but the most intense racing 160 will more than work. I have been running shimano 525 calipers for over a year and mechanical discs before that. Even with a 160mm rotor setup you will have 1-2 finger braking in virtually all conditions encountered.
    As far as hubs go, look into getting Sunrace Juju instead of shimano. They are sealed cartridge bearings, which will last far longer and with less maintenance than the shimanos or similar.
    www.gaerlan.com/bikeparts/parts/disk/disk.html
     
  4. drewjc

    drewjc New Member

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    If you're on a budget why not look at the shimano m475 hubs? I built a set of training wheels up with 700c rims on my mtb with these hubs and they r cheap and roll just as well as the standard (on my bike) m525 hubs. Also you shouldnt need to buy nipples as they come with most spokes. Im not sure about the sun hubs but they sound like a good idea to me if you can find them. The standard 160mm disc should also be fine, trust me unless you are riding ridiculous downhills or are really big person i doubt you will need the larger 185mm size, they r just a pain in the bum to set up with adapters etc.
     
  5. dan0512

    dan0512 New Member

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    Are there 475's with 36 holes? I was thinking of the 185mm rotors because sometimes I ride with a small trailer hooked up that we can load with 100 pounds of stuff (collecting news papers, etc), and I was opting for more brake power. And, how do the shimano mechs compare to the avid bb7's? And to build the wheel, do I need any special tools?

    Dan
     
  6. drewjc

    drewjc New Member

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    As far as i know there is a 36h option on these hubs. Im sure they asked me when i bought mine. The Sun hubs sound like a good option though, that's if you havent already looked at them. I really dont think that 185mm is worth the hassle to be honest. If you really think that u need that much braking then go for it but discs are bloody powerful and i personally dont think it is worthwhile. Im not riding the bike, so u make the decision and that IS a lot of luggage! I have a friend who warped a hayes front disc while riding with a trailer at some ridiculous speed (around 80km/h i believe) and had to make an emergency stop, but he is a big lad around 90kg i think. So even discs have their downfalls.
     
  7. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Do you have long descents planned with the trailer load?
    How much do you weigh?
    Your budget may push you to Deore hubs (not XT or LX). Others think that Cartridge bearing hubs are better, but I am not in that camp.
    Wheel building on disc wheels is critical. Make sure to use quality spokes, spoke alignment, stresss relief, proper tension, tension balancing, and check your build after the first few rides.
    I like rims with Off center spoke beds for use with disc brakes. This will really blow your budget, but they increase wheel durability by allowing the spokes to share the load more equally. Spoke support angle(s) are diminished on disc wheels due to the offset for rotors.
    Some quality Off Center rims for this aplication are Ritchey OCR and Velocity Synergy Asym/
     
  8. dan0512

    dan0512 New Member

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    Another question- Can I use any normal V-brake lever for the disc brakes? and what adapter would I need to mound the 185mm caliper? I weigh around 125 pounds. Yes there are some pretty long descents with the trailer (100m-150), and stopping with the V-brakes has been a pain...

    Dan
     
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