Discovering leather saddles

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Jacques, Jun 15, 2003.

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  1. Jacques

    Jacques Guest

    I just bought a Brooks B17 leather saddle yesterday morning for my city/tour bike. I was a bike
    apprehensive, wondering about the necessary "break-in": how long ? how hard until it is complete ?
    The result was above all my expectations. In the same afternoon (and evening) I was able to ride
    back home on 190 km (my record !) with very limited pain, even though that brand new saddle was not
    even broken in. As a comparison, I have always suffered a lot after 80-100 km with all other saddles
    I have used, from the cheap plastic one to the gel filled Selle Italia I have on my road bike.

    Jacques
     
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  2. kh6zv9

    kh6zv9 Guest

    jacques <[email protected]> wrote:
    : I just bought a Brooks B17 leather saddle yesterday morning for my city/tour bike. I was a bike
    : apprehensive, wondering about the necessary "break-in": how long ? how hard until it is complete
    : ? The result was above all my expectations. In the same afternoon (and evening) I was able to
    : ride back home on 190 km (my record !) with very limited pain, even though that brand new saddle
    : was not even broken in. As a comparison, I have always suffered a lot after 80-100 km with all
    : other saddles I have used, from the cheap plastic one to the gel filled Selle Italia I have on my
    : road bike.

    : Jacques

    That was my experience also with a Brooks b-17. Rode 70 miles on it out of the box and my butt
    felt great.

    --------------------------------
    Bob Masse' [email protected]
    --------------------------------
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 12:06:26 +0200, "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The result was above all my expectations. In the same afternoon (and evening) I was able to ride
    >back home on 190 km (my record !) with very limited pain, even though that brand new saddle was not
    >even broken in.

    I am with you on this: I have never found a running-in period necessary with a B17 (the first time I
    rode the current one was century, no problem at all). I think if they fit well, they fit from day
    one and just keep getting better. If they fit poorly then it's your arse that breaks in and not the
    saddle :-D

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  4. Bob

    Bob Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 12:06:26 +0200, "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >The result was above all my expectations. In the same afternoon (and evening) I was able to ride
    > >back home on 190 km (my record !) with very limited pain, even though that brand new saddle was
    > >not even broken in.
    >
    > I am with you on this: I have never found a running-in period necessary with a B17 (the first time
    > I rode the current one was century, no problem at all). I think if they fit well, they fit from
    > day one and just keep getting better. If they fit poorly then it's your arse that breaks in and
    > not the saddle :-D
    >
    > Guy

    The only problem I had with mine was that I could not get the seat to go far enough back. I had to
    buy a seat post with setback. This is partially my bike's geometry, as I've had to do this
    periodically, depending on the seat.
     
  5. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "jacques" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:p[email protected]...
    > How about the following miles ?
    cut............

    As a Brooks leather saddle moulds to your shape over time, it will never be more uncomfortable than
    when its new! peter
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 18:39:41 GMT, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The only problem I had with mine was that I could not get the seat to go far enough back. I had to
    >buy a seat post with setback. This is partially my bike's geometry, as I've had to do this
    >periodically, depending on the seat.

    I have a long stem, but my bike was originally built with a Brooks. I've wondered about a shorter
    stem and setback seatpost as this is apparently more comfortable on long rides. But then if I want
    real comfort I have a recumbent...

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  7. On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 18:39:41 GMT, "Bob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >The only problem I had with mine was that I could not get the seat to go far enough back. I had to
    >buy a seat post with setback. This is partially my bike's geometry, as I've had to do this
    >periodically, depending on the seat.
    >

    Rivendell Bicycles recently featured a Brooks saddle in their newsletter that has a longer straight
    segment in the mounting rails which would allow you to push the seat back further without getting a
    special seatpost.

    I know this news comes too late to help you out, and that is too bad, but maybe others would like to
    know that.

    I guess Selle bought Brooks out. Rivendell doesn't necessarily see that as a bad thing. I guess time
    will tell.
     
  8. "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:

    > I am with you on this: I have never found a running-in period necessary with a B17 (the first time
    > I rode the current one was

    My experience as well. My 7-8 year old B17 is very supple with a moulded "pocket" where my tail is
    placed. Been across the country and very comfortable.

    A new B17 Champion purchased nearly a year ago is still quite hard. No pocket formed yet (I think
    the leather is thicker than with the standard). Still a very comfy ride with the only drawback being
    I slide around a bit on it.

    > century, no problem at all). I think if they fit well, they fit from day one and just keep getting
    > better. If they fit poorly then it's your arse that breaks in and not the saddle :-D

    Leather saddles break in, but the ultimate adaptive system is the human body. It can pretty much
    adapt to *anything*, *eventually*, *if it has to*!

    SMH
     
  9. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 19:47:20 GMT, Zippy the Pinhead <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >I guess Selle bought Brooks out. Rivendell doesn't necessarily see that as a bad thing. I guess
    >time will tell.

    "Selle" means "saddle" in Italian. There's Selle Italia, Selle San Marco, Selle Royal, etc., etc.,
    etc. These are all different companies.

    Pinhead indeed!

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  10. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    >
    > > I am with you on this: I have never found a running-in period necessary with a B17 (the first
    > > time I rode the current one was
    >
    > My experience as well. My 7-8 year old B17 is very supple with a moulded "pocket" where my tail is
    > placed. Been across the country and very comfortable.

    If, by "tail", you mean your coccyx ("tailbone"), I'd like to see that. You must've put in some
    pretty uncomfortable miles to achieve that.

    >
    > A new B17 Champion purchased nearly a year ago is still quite hard. No pocket formed yet (I think
    > the leather is thicker than with the standard). Still a very comfy ride with the only drawback
    > being I slide around a bit on it.
    >
    > > century, no problem at all). I think if they fit well, they fit from day one and just keep
    > > getting better. If they fit poorly then it's your arse that breaks in and not the saddle :-D
    >
    > Leather saddles break in, but the ultimate adaptive system is the human body. It can pretty much
    > adapt to *anything*, *eventually*, *if it has to*!

    That's the good part, but they eventually break down to the ass-hatchet form. Leather-covered
    plastic saddles that fit right off-the-bat and stay that way for their life are the way to go. No
    Proofide needed, either!

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  11. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 15 Jun 2003 19:47:20 GMT, Zippy the Pinhead <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >I guess Selle bought Brooks out. Rivendell doesn't necessarily see that as a bad thing. I guess
    > >time will tell.
    >
    > "Selle" means "saddle" in Italian. There's Selle Italia, Selle San Marco, Selle Royal, etc., etc.,
    > etc. These are all different companies.
    >
    > Pinhead indeed!
    >
    >

    I have reason to believe that there's not quite three separate companies here. Kinda like Brooks is
    Selle Italia. Anybody with the real scoop?

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  12. Robin Hubert wrote:

    > "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > My experience as well. My 7-8 year old B17 is very supple with a moulded "pocket" where my tail
    > > is placed. Been across the country and very comfortable.
    >
    > If, by "tail", you mean your coccyx ("tailbone"), I'd like to see that. You must've put in some
    > pretty uncomfortable miles to achieve that.

    "Tail" meaning "butt", or to be more concise for you, "ischial protuberances".

    > > Leather saddles break in, but the ultimate adaptive system is the human body. It can pretty much
    > > adapt to *anything*, *eventually*, *if it has to*!
    >
    > That's the good part, but they eventually break down to the ass-hatchet form. Leather-covered
    > plastic saddles that fit right off-the-bat and stay that way for their life are the way to go. No
    > Proofide needed, either!

    Problem is the "fit right off-the-bat" part. Leather adjusts, plastic largely doesn't.

    If the plastic fits, great. If it doesn't, you have to adjust, and that's possible given some
    time and pain.

    Leather adjusts to you better than plastic does, and if you take care of the saddle, it won't be
    very soon that it breaks down into something no longer comfortable.

    There's a reason the Brooks is a favorite amongst long distance riders.

    SMH
     
  13. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > > "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >
    > > > My experience as well. My 7-8 year old B17 is very supple with a moulded "pocket" where my
    > > > tail is placed. Been across the country and very comfortable.
    > >
    > > If, by "tail", you mean your coccyx ("tailbone"), I'd like to see that.
    You
    > > must've put in some pretty uncomfortable miles to achieve that.
    >
    > "Tail" meaning "butt", or to be more concise for you, "ischial
    protuberances".
    >
    > > > Leather saddles break in, but the ultimate adaptive system is the human body. It can pretty
    > > > much adapt to *anything*, *eventually*, *if it has to*!
    > >
    > > That's the good part, but they eventually break down to the ass-hatchet form. Leather-covered
    > > plastic saddles that fit right off-the-bat and
    stay
    > > that way for their life are the way to go. No Proofide needed, either!
    >
    > Problem is the "fit right off-the-bat" part. Leather adjusts, plastic largely doesn't.
    >
    > If the plastic fits, great. If it doesn't, you have to adjust, and that's possible given some time
    > and pain.
    >
    > Leather adjusts to you better than plastic does, and if you take care of the saddle, it won't be
    > very soon that it breaks down into something no longer comfortable.
    >
    > There's a reason the Brooks is a favorite amongst long distance riders.
    >

    Gee, you might believe I'd never used a Brooks. You'd be wrong.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  14. Robin Hubert wrote:

    > "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > > Leather adjusts to you better than plastic does, and if you take care of the saddle, it won't be
    > > very soon that it breaks down into something no longer comfortable.
    > >
    > > There's a reason the Brooks is a favorite amongst long distance riders.
    >
    > Gee, you might believe I'd never used a Brooks. You'd be wrong.

    OK. There is no perfect saddle for everyone. However it's very rare for me to come across someone
    who didn't like the Brooks. You appear to be one.

    I have used plastic saddles too. They can crack and warp, and coverings tear or hole. Something that
    rarely (ever?) happens to the Brooks.

    Have to wonder what you did, or how long it took, for your Brooks to "break down into the
    ass-hatchet form". This has yet to happen to any of mine in about 8 years for the oldest.

    SMH
     
  15. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Robin Hubert wrote:
    >
    > > "Stephen Harding" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > >
    > > > Leather adjusts to you better than plastic does, and if you take care
    of
    > > > the saddle, it won't be very soon that it breaks down into something
    no
    > > > longer comfortable.
    > > >
    > > > There's a reason the Brooks is a favorite amongst long distance
    riders.
    > >
    > > Gee, you might believe I'd never used a Brooks. You'd be wrong.
    >
    > OK. There is no perfect saddle for everyone.

    I agree, though it's not as complicated as most make it.

    > However it's very rare for me to come across someone who didn't like the Brooks. You appear to >be
    one.

    I actually liked my Brooks Pro. I just didn't like taking care of it, and I never had it long enough
    for it to wear out (having been stolen with the bike). What I really don't like too much about them
    now is that they offer very little adjustability and your fit/bike geometry needs to be spot on.

    > I have used plastic saddles too. They can crack and warp, and coverings
    tear
    > or hole. Something that rarely (ever?) happens to the Brooks.
    >
    > Have to wonder what you did, or how long it took, for your Brooks to
    "break
    > down into the ass-hatchet form". This has yet to happen to any of mine
    in
    > about 8 years for the oldest.
    >

    True, it takes quite some time, well, more accurately, "miles". How many miles on that saddle?

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  16. Robin Hubert wrote:

    >
    > > Have to wonder what you did, or how long it took, for your Brooks to "break down into the
    > > ass-hatchet form". This has yet to happen to any of mine in about 8 years for the oldest.
    >
    > True, it takes quite some time, well, more accurately, "miles". How many miles on that saddle?

    For the oldest Brooks B17 Standard, probably about 20,000 miles on it. The new (about one year old)
    B17 Champion only about 3-4000. The oldest one was a "touring saddle" so it has been rained on.
    Doesn't seem to have effected it.

    Haven't Profided any of them yet for this season, but typically give them a going over once or
    twice a year.

    SMH
     
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