Dished rollers?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Gary Jacobson, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered on
    the roller. Also by moving up the gradient towards the rails you could change the resistance without
    shifting. They were easier to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    me) as traditional rollers.

    Any of these rollers still made?

    Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY
     
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  2. Edward Dike

    Edward Dike Guest

    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    | I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered on
    | the roller. Also by moving up the gradient
    towards
    | the rails you could change the resistance without shifting. They were
    easier
    | to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    me)
    | as traditional rollers.
    |
    | Any of these rollers still made?
    |
    | Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY
    |
    |

    The dished rollers I recall were from the late '70s-early '80s. They were unique in that the rollers
    were wood. Being a tightwad at the time, I copied the idea, and built myself a set of wood rollers.
    I used a 4" hole saw to cut a bunch of 'donuts' out of 3/4' birch lumber. I cut a 3/4" bore in each
    wooded disc, and laminated them together on a 3/4" steel shaft. On a lathe, I then turned a dished
    profile. I spent more time building them than I did using them, as they weren't anywhere near
    balanced enough to spin at riding speeds. However, they did look as though they would have made a
    nice set of lamp bases.... ED3
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered on
    > the roller. Also by moving up the gradient
    towards
    > the rails you could change the resistance without shifting. They were
    easier
    > to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    me)
    > as traditional rollers.
    >
    > Any of these rollers still made?

    I'm curious. Do you mean larger in the center than at the ends like a drum for a belt-drive?

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    I have a set, the only decal says "The Big Yankee, made in USA."

    They are hourglass shaped, with non-folding gold color anodized aluminum frame. The resistance is
    higher on the smaller diameter section since the rollers have higher rpms (=> higher bearing
    resistance) and your tires deform more.

    They are beautiful and provide a great workout - more than enough resistance.

    -Bruce

    "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered on
    > the roller. Also by moving up the gradient
    towards
    > the rails you could change the resistance without shifting. They were
    easier
    > to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    me)
    > as traditional rollers.
    >
    > Any of these rollers still made?
    >
    > Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY
     
  5. These were wood drums, and the were hourglass shaped. Narrow in the middle, wide at the rails.

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered
    > > on the roller. Also by moving up the gradient
    > towards
    > > the rails you could change the resistance without shifting. They were
    > easier
    > > to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    > me)
    > > as traditional rollers.
    > >
    > > Any of these rollers still made?
    >
    >
    > I'm curious. Do you mean larger in the center than at the ends like a drum for a belt-drive?
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  6. Those are the ones I had! Love to find another set. GJ

    "Bruce" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have a set, the only decal says "The Big Yankee, made in USA."
    >
    > They are hourglass shaped, with non-folding gold color anodized aluminum frame. The resistance is
    > higher on the smaller diameter section since the rollers have higher rpms (=> higher bearing
    > resistance) and your tires deform more.
    >
    > They are beautiful and provide a great workout - more than enough resistance.
    >
    > -Bruce
    >
    > "Gary Jacobson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I used to have rollers that were dished so that you would naturally tend towards being centered
    > > on the roller. Also by moving up the gradient
    > towards
    > > the rails you could change the resistance without shifting. They were
    > easier
    > > to use, (but perhaps not as good for training for some unknown reason to
    > me)
    > > as traditional rollers.
    > >
    > > Any of these rollers still made?
    > >
    > > Gary Jacobson Rosendale, NY
    > >
    >
     
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