Disk Brake slipping - my fault and need advice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Roksonixx, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. Roksonixx

    Roksonixx New Member

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    hi guys, im hoping someone can help me with a small problem i have with my disk brake,

    i have one on the front wheel, and it used to work perfectly, (by this i mean a small squeeze on the lever and it almost locked up), however it started squealing REALLY loud and i couldn't put up with any more, so i decided to use a bit of oil to clean the disk break itself,

    STUPID ME

    now i realised i probably messed the pad up, because ever since that day its always slipped, i'm looking some advice on how to clean my pad up, because the oil has obviously contaminated it, making it more slippery and refusing to break properly

    i've resorted to just using the back break, because the front is almost useless when travelling at any speed, do i need new pads?

    thanks all
     
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  2. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Clean the disk with brake cleaner. Throw out the pads and get new ones.
     
  3. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Is it mechanical or hydraulic?
     
  4. Roksonixx

    Roksonixx New Member

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    it's pads pulled together by a steel wire, so im guessing this is mechanical
     
  5. tafi

    tafi Member

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    The annoyingly ambiguous term "mechanical" could be applied to either hydraulic or cable operated systems, but i digress....

    In any case it doesn't matter what the actuation system is, the solution is the same: Clean pads and clean rotor. I have occasionally removed oil contamination with the careful use of a blowtorch on the back of the pad but your pads are probably beyond resurrection.

    As mentioned above "brake claner" (propan-2-ol, 2-propanol, or isopropyl-alcohol) with a clean rag is a good remedy for the rotor.

    Ironically minor contamination is probably the cause of the squealing in the first place.
     
  6. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    This link has plenty of tutorial videos for bike repair and maintenance. You can check out pad replacement. In the future you can check it out before you make a decision that could backfire.
    http://bicycletutor.com/
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. While you are addressing what to do about the the contaminated brake pads, to get you back on the trail/road safely, swap the rear pads for the front, and vice-versa ...

    Do your best to clean the pads which you contaminated ...

    Consider buying two sets of pads -- one set to eventually replace the contaminated pads & one set for your tool box.
     
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