Disk brakes

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Technician, May 13, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Technician

    Technician Guest

    ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.

    For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering what
    options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search has not
    returned anything that makes any money yet). the front will be easy. upgrade the wheel to disk
    compatible (or at least the hub), and upgrade the fork. the back, i was wondering if there was an
    option other than those ugly floating linkage things, or if there was something that could clamp on
    to the rear triangle somehow.

    Main intent is a more smooth braking power, more tolerance to a slightly tweaked wheel, and ease of
    wheel removal. the terrain i ride ranged from XC to some DH (though not as technical as when i had
    the FS bike of course).

    Currently i have not decided on what brand brakes i want as it may be quite a while down the road so
    i want to leave my options open. And similarly, i plan to use a hydraulic system, though future
    money constraints may dictate the rate of upgrade (may go mechanical first, then upgrade to
    hydraulics later).

    I understand there is the option of only having a disk on the front, though if possible, i would
    like one on back as well.

    So, i guess the question again is, will i be able to find a clean looking adaptor for the rear, or
    will i have to settle with just a front disk?

    There are some mounting tab things, but i assume they are for a bike rack as they do not look strong
    enough for disk brakes, and the spacing is wrong. at least, that's compared to the shimano
    compatible caliper mounts on the goose, that BTW has been sold, shipped, and i assume delivered
    (haven't heard anything from the buyer).
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
    Tags:


  2. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Technician wrote:
    > ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.
    >
    > For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering what
    > options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search has
    > not returned anything that makes any money yet).

    He's dreaming again.

    Penny
     
  3. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > (like i said, future, job search has not returned anything that makes any money yet).

    Where are you, and what kind of jobs are you looking for? What is your background and/or field of
    expertise? (That's a little nicer than the presumptuous and grammatically questionable "What did you
    major in?", as if that were the only factor in a job search...)

    I'm going back to grad school for the next 2 years to avoid looking for jobs where they don't exist
    :) Illinois is getting hit pretty hard. We've had huge layoffs in the last few years (Motorola, for
    example). The state budget has been gutted, so this Big 10 college town (Champaign-Urbana, home of
    the University of Illinois Frightening Illini) is having a rough time.

    (sorry for the WOT...but I'll bet Travis isn't the only one here with job concerns)

    -Barry
     
  4. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Technician wrote:
    > > ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.
    > >
    > > For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering
    > > what options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search
    > > has not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    >
    >
    > He's dreaming again.
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >

    Perhaps, hence the words "future reference". has it become poor netiquette to ask a question for
    research now?
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  5. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    "Penny S." <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Technician wrote:
    > > ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.
    > >
    > > For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering
    > > what options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search
    > > has not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    >
    >
    > He's dreaming again.
    >
    > Penny

    I'm dreaming....dreaming of someone driving over to his house and smacking him upside the head!
    Come-on, somebody has to live within driving distance (tap...tap...tap)....heck I'll pay for the gas
    and even a couple meals if the drive is long.....PLEASE!!!!

    " Johnny was bad, even as a child everybody could tell Everyone said if you don't get straight
    You'll surely go to hell

    But Johnny didn't care He was an outlaw by the time that he was Ten years old He didn't wanna do
    what he was told Just a prankster, juvenile gangster

    His teachers didn't understand They kicked him out of school At a tender early age Just because he
    didn't want to learn things (Had other interests) He liked to burn things

    The lady down the block She had a radio that Johnny wanted oh so bad So he took it the first chance
    he had Then he shot her in the leg And this is what she said Only a lad You really can't blame him
    Only a lad Society made him Only a lad He's our responsibility Only a lad He really couldn't help
    it Only a lad He didn't want to do it Only a lad He's underprivileged and abused Perhaps a little
    bit confused

    His parents gave up they couldn't influence his attitude Nobody could help The little man had
    no gratitude

    And when he stole the care Nobody dreamed that he would Try to take it so far He didn't mean to hit
    the poor man Who had to go and die It made the judge cry

    Only a lad He really couldn't help it Only a lad He didn't want to do it Only a lad He's
    underprivileged and abused Perhaps a little bit confused

    It's not his fault that he can't believe It's not his fault that he can't behave Society made him go
    astray Perhaps if we're nice he'll go away Perhaps he'll go away He'll go away

    Hey there Johnny you really don't fool me You get away with murder And you think it's funny You
    don't give a damn if we live or if we die Hey there Johnny boy I hope you fry! "

    --
    Slacker
     
  6. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > (like i said, future, job search has not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    >
    > Where are you, and what kind of jobs are you looking for? What is your background and/or field of
    > expertise? (That's a little nicer than the presumptuous and grammatically questionable "What did
    > you major in?", as if that were the only factor in a job search...)
    >

    I'm in Farmington, Maine. I guess my background could be classified as electrical/mechanical (scored
    top on electrical and mechanical on ASVAB) with very good strengths in computers. In these fields, i
    am quite easily taught, so i am only marginally limited by current knowledge.

    Mechanically i can usually look at some sort of machine, and with a bit of time, and tools to open
    'er up for examination, i can have it pretty much figured out in a few hours. I have rebuilt a
    2-cycle motorcycle using the manual only for specific settings or torque.

    Electrically, i am the same way. i have re-wired my room several times to place an outlet where
    needed, or to change an outlet over to a grounded one. I can also do well in the electronics end of
    it. i have built several audio amplifiers, though i have yet to understand them fully, i can read a
    schematic and generate a circuit from it with little difficulty (providing that i have reference
    materials for any semiconductors).

    With computers, i may not know all there is to know, but i have a fairly broad area of knowledge. i
    have a very good understanding of the scripting format, thus i can usually read and understand most
    any script language enough to learn from it. Hardware is simple to me, it is nothing to swap out a
    component whenever needed, and software is much the same. there are so many similarities that most
    programs can be learned by simply working with it for a while.

    For the longest time, i had no idea what i wanted to do for a living. for a while i though i enjoyed
    computers enough that i would like to be employed using them. I have since decided (while building
    up the GT actually) that i much prefer mechanical work. i enjoy getting down and dirty with tools
    and working with my hands. I just have to find the job that best fits this joy.

    A position has opened up at the local VIP (discount auto parts, aka crappy parts at a low price) for
    a full-time tire changer. not sure exactly what it entails, but i figure it is worth a shot.

    a fairly recent (within the past 3 years) interest of mine is turbine jet engines. i would love to
    work in this field, but the only positions available are at airports, and there is so much at risk,
    that it kind of takes away from the job. now, assuming i got the needed training and the FAA
    certification, it would be nice to be a jet engine mechanic for just a few small jet aircraft. but i
    fear i don't have a good enough credit to apply for another student loan (mainly because i have to
    keep deferring my last student loan).

    > I'm going back to grad school for the next 2 years to avoid looking for jobs where they don't
    > exist :) Illinois is getting hit pretty hard. We've had huge layoffs in the last few years
    > (Motorola, for example). The state budget has been gutted, so this Big 10 college town
    > (Champaign-Urbana, home of the University of Illinois Frightening Illini) is having a rough time.
    >

    Yeah, i think the unemployment rate is nationally large. i may have to go back to school as well.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  7. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Technician wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >> "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>> (like i said, future, job search has not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    >>
    >> Where are you, and what kind of jobs are you looking for? What is your background and/or field of
    >> expertise? (That's a little nicer than the presumptuous and grammatically questionable "What did
    >> you major in?", as if that were the only factor in a job search...)
    >>
    >
    > I'm in Farmington, Maine. I guess my background could be classified as electrical/mechanical
    > (scored top on electrical and mechanical on ASVAB) with very good strengths in computers. In these
    > fields, i am quite easily taught, so i am only marginally limited by current knowledge.

    just curious, do you have any real world experience in this stuff? Not trying to poke, but be
    serious here. One thought is that if jobs are scarce, volunteering your skills builds real world
    experience and looks good on a resume`

    Penny
     
  8. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Technician wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >> "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]...
    > >>
    > >>> (like i said, future, job search has not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    > >>
    > >> Where are you, and what kind of jobs are you looking for? What is your background and/or field
    > >> of expertise? (That's a little nicer than the presumptuous and grammatically questionable "What
    > >> did you major in?", as if that were the only factor in a job search...)
    > >>
    > >
    > > I'm in Farmington, Maine. I guess my background could be classified as electrical/mechanical
    > > (scored top on electrical and mechanical on ASVAB) with very good strengths in computers. In
    > > these fields, i am quite easily taught, so i am only marginally limited by current knowledge.
    >
    > just curious, do you have any real world experience in this stuff? Not trying to poke, but be
    > serious here. One thought is that if jobs are scarce, volunteering your skills builds real world
    > experience and looks good on a resume`
    >
    > Penny
    >
    >
    >

    Unfortunately it is all self taught, and not really anybody to back it up, except the town "crazy
    guy" whom i did a little computer work for, but he isn't exactly somebody you want to use as a
    reference.

    I have thought of volunteering, but there is not even really any place to volunteer anymore. i tried
    to see about the public library using me to do PC repair on their systems, or at the very least, be
    a tech desk guy for the users, but they already have a guy to do all that. as far as mechanical, i'm
    at a loss how i can volunteer there. and electrical, i belive i need a licence to do any of that
    outside of my own home (and i think you technically need one for even that). As far as i can figure,
    the only real way i will get any experience is to get a job in one of those fields, hence applying
    at VIP for the tire changer job.

    Like i said though, i may have to go back to school in order to get a little piece of paper that
    says i can do what i know i can (anybody know of a college that has a jet engine mechanic major?
    preferably fairly near maine as i would either have to drive, or come up with some money to fly).
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  9. Pete

    Pete Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote

    > I have thought of volunteering, but there is not even really any place to volunteer anymore. i
    > tried to see about the public library using me to do PC repair on their systems, or at the very
    > least, be a tech desk guy for the users, but they already have a guy to do all that. as far as
    > mechanical, i'm at a loss how i can volunteer there. and electrical, i belive i need a licence to
    > do any of that outside of my own home (and i think you technically need one for even that). As far
    > as i can figure, the only real way i will get any experience is to get a job in one of those
    > fields, hence applying at VIP for the tire changer job.

    Volunteer jobs: Build and host a website for the local playhouse group. Be a stagehand for them as
    well. (Lighting, sound, etc) Build a database for the elementary school reading program. Ask around
    at the local mom and pop PC shop and see if they need any 'free' help. Start a PC recycling deal for
    underprivileged families. Get throwaways, fix them up, and give them out. Start a bike recycling
    deal of the same sort of families.

    This is not new information, Trav. We've been over this before.

    >
    > Like i said though, i may have to go back to school in order to get a little piece of paper that
    > says i can do what i know i can (anybody know of a college that has a jet engine mechanic major?
    > preferably fairly near maine as i would either have to drive, or come up with some money to fly).
    > --

    well, gee...a 2 minute google turned up the Embry-Riddle Brunswick Center, at NAS Brunswick. Or,
    join the Maine ANG.

    You're not trying, son.

    Pete
     
  10. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Slacker wrote:

    >
    > " Johnny was bad, even as a child everybody could tell Everyone said if you don't get straight
    > You'll surely go to hell
    >
    > But Johnny didn't care He was an outlaw by the time that he was Ten years old He didn't wanna do
    > what he was told Just a prankster, juvenile gangster
    >
    > His teachers didn't understand They kicked him out of school At a tender early age Just because he
    > didn't want to learn things (Had other interests) He liked to burn things
    >
    > The lady down the block She had a radio that Johnny wanted oh so bad So he took it the first
    > chance he had Then he shot her in the leg And this is what she said Only a lad You really can't
    > blame him Only a lad Society made him Only a lad He's our responsibility Only a lad He really
    > couldn't help it Only a lad He didn't want to do it Only a lad He's underprivileged and abused
    > Perhaps a little bit confused
    >
    > His parents gave up they couldn't influence his attitude Nobody could help The little man had no
    > gratitude
    >
    > And when he stole the care Nobody dreamed that he would Try to take it so far He didn't mean to
    > hit the poor man Who had to go and die It made the judge cry
    >
    > Only a lad He really couldn't help it Only a lad He didn't want to do it Only a lad He's
    > underprivileged and abused Perhaps a little bit confused
    >
    > It's not his fault that he can't believe It's not his fault that he can't behave Society made him
    > go astray Perhaps if we're nice he'll go away Perhaps he'll go away He'll go away
    >
    > Hey there Johnny you really don't fool me You get away with murder And you think it's funny You
    > don't give a damn if we live or if we die Hey there Johnny boy I hope you fry! "
    >
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
    >
    >

    Hey, Slack, you're a SoCal boy- did you get to see the "Goodbye Goodbye" mini tour? I was sad to see
    one of the very best concert bands go, but I enjoyed sending them off.

    Miles
     
  11. Slacker

    Slacker Guest

    > Hey, Slack, you're a SoCal boy- did you get to see the "Goodbye Goodbye" mini tour? I was sad to
    > see one of the very best concert bands go, but I enjoyed sending them off.
    >
    > Miles

    Actually, as much as I like them, I never did see them live. I do think Elfman is a musical genius.

    --
    Slacker
     
  12. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.
    >
    > For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering what
    > options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search has
    > not returned anything that makes any money yet).

    <snipped rest>

    Travis my man, I think you're approaching this wrong...

    While there is nothing inherently "wrong" with your new GT frame, it's not the kind of thing you
    should think about throwing a lot of money at. Just as the group helped you to understand your Goose
    had no right to a Thompson post, hydraulic brakes on that bike are little over the top. You'd
    honestly be better served saving your money and moving into the wonderful world of

    time you get the $2K or so together (it sounds like it'd be over a year) you'll know if you plan to
    stay committed to cycling or not...who knows, in a year you could have a lady friend and a little
    Travis on the way, and the new-bike-fund will be quickly reallocated. I don't want to sound
    insulting in the least, but just as $1500 rims, a 5-point harness, and a loud muffler won't make a
    Neon a race car, hydraulic discs are probably overkill for your GT. Keep the bike forever - or
    better yet, keep it 'til your better off, and you meet a kid that reminds you of yourself, and
    return AMB's favor - but undrestand there are still limitations.

    ...and regarding disc brake research...if it's going to be a few years before you make the purchase,
    what brake systems do you think will be available then? Nothing will probably be the same (who saw
    Avid's Juicy7 setup coming 18 months ago) and all your info-gathering will be moot.

    I don't want to knock you down or come off harsh - your enthusiasm is awesome...biking needs more
    folks like you - but there are limitations. A disc brake would probably twist that GTs stay up like
    a Twizzler :)

    Penny says you're dreaming...know there is nothing wrong with that. But keep your feet on the
    ground. And ride that GT 'til your legs fall off.

    Chris
     
  13. Add front discs bu upgrading fork/wheel

    Forget about putting a disc on the rear the of that bike... Just get some Cane Creek Direct
    Curve-II's or Magura's
     
  14. Technician

    Technician Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > > I have thought of volunteering, but there is not even really any place to volunteer anymore. i
    > > tried to see about the public library using me to do PC repair on their systems, or at the very
    > > least, be a tech desk guy for the users, but they already have a guy to do all that. as far as
    > > mechanical, i'm at a loss how i can volunteer there. and electrical, i belive i need a licence
    > > to do any of that outside of my own home (and i think you technically need one for even that).
    > > As far as i can figure, the only real way i will get any experience is to get a job in one of
    > > those fields, hence applying at VIP for the tire changer job.
    >
    > Volunteer jobs: Build and host a website for the local playhouse group. Be a stagehand for them as
    > well. (Lighting, sound, etc)

    The only playhouse we have is university owned and operated. if your not part of their university
    (staff or student), they don't want you (except for the audience at public plays).

    > Build a database for the elementary school reading program.

    I have been told they already have one, though a check on their site fails to find one. perhaps
    parents are given a "special" url to get to
    it.http://www.mallett.msad9.k12.me.us/ (try the search, he he. i _hate_ frontpage with a passion).

    > Ask around at the local mom and pop PC shop and see if they need any 'free' help.

    All the mom 'n pop computer stores have gone out of business. all that is left if Staples and
    Office-Max 40 miles away.

    > Start a PC recycling deal for underprivileged families. Get throwaways, fix them up, and give them
    > out. Start a bike recycling deal of the same sort of families.
    >

    i have thought of this, but have been held back by two things.
    1.) like any other program for underprivileged families in this area (and many others i assume),
    people will cheat the system.
    2.) i am very unorganized. in fact, my teachers kept threatening to submit me as an example for
    Websters Dictionary. i am a total synonym for organization.

    > This is not new information, Trav. We've been over this before.
    >
    > >
    > > Like i said though, i may have to go back to school in order to get a little piece of paper
    > > that says i can do what i know i can (anybody know of a college that has a jet engine mechanic
    > > major? preferably fairly near maine as i would either have to drive, or come up with some money
    > > to fly).
    > > --
    >
    > well, gee...a 2 minute google turned up the Embry-Riddle Brunswick Center, at NAS Brunswick. Or,
    > join the Maine ANG.
    >

    I did actually search, and may have come up with Embry-Riddle, though their main site, as far as i
    could find, does not list the brunswick center so i may have skipped over it. re-searching using
    "Embry-Riddle Brunswick Center" for keywords did return information about the brunswick center. i
    filled out the form for information request, so i will see what they offer. the engine maintenance
    course picture shows a reciprocating engine, though they may still teach about turbine engines.

    Thanks for pointing it out.
    --
    ~Travis

    travis57 at megalink dot net http://www.megalink.net/~farmers/
     
  15. Miles Todd

    Miles Todd Guest

    Slacker wrote:
    >>Hey, Slack, you're a SoCal boy- did you get to see the "Goodbye Goodbye" mini tour? I was sad to
    >>see one of the very best concert bands go, but I enjoyed sending them off.
    >>
    >>Miles
    >
    >
    >
    > Actually, as much as I like them, I never did see them live. I do think Elfman is a
    > musical genius.
    >
    > --
    > Slacker
    >
    >

    Dooood... I hate to rub it in, but a half-dozen or so of the very best shows I have evr seen were
    Boingo shows. if they evre do a reunion. GO.

    Miles
     
  16. Penny S.

    Penny S. Guest

    Technician wrote:
    >
    > The only playhouse we have is university owned and operated. if your not part of their university
    > (staff or student), they don't want you (except for the audience at public plays).

    did you ask?
    >
    >> Build a database for the elementary school reading program.
    >
    > I have been told they already have one, though a check on their site fails to find one. perhaps
    > parents are given a "special" url to get to
    > it.http://www.mallett.msad9.k12.me.us/ (try the search, he he. i _hate_ frontpage with a passion).
    >

    show me a public shcool that won't take volunteers.... please. ( unless you

    >> Ask around at the local mom and pop PC shop and see if they need any 'free' help.
    > >> Start a PC recycling deal for underprivileged families. Get
    >> throwaways, fix them up, and give them out. Start a bike recycling deal of the same sort of
    >> families.
    >>
    >
    > i have thought of this, but have been held back by two things.
    > 1.) like any other program for underprivileged families in this area (and many others i assume),
    > people will cheat the system.

    do you know for sure? For all the cheaters there are deserving folks who've gotten bad breaks too.
    Try a battered womens's shelter if you need convicing of this.

    > 2.) i am very unorganized. in fact, my teachers kept threatening to submit me as an example for
    > Websters Dictionary. i am a total synonym for organization.
    >

    So? So was Einstien. You are so full of excuses and lack of imagination that it's really pathetic.

    Do or do not, there is not try.

    Penny
     
  17. Kathleen

    Kathleen Guest

    Penny S. wrote:
    > Technician wrote:
    >
    >>ok, so the subject was a little vague, i couldn't think of a quick summery so it'll have to do.
    >>
    >>For future reference (ok, so i'm really obsessive about researching things), i was wondering what
    >>options were available for upgrading the GT to disk brakes (like i said, future, job search has
    >>not returned anything that makes any money yet).
    >
    >
    >
    > He's dreaming again.

    When my dog dreams, he makes running motions and whines and drools.

    Apparently Travis does the same thing, only with his paws on the keyboard.

    Kathleen "All your tennis balls are belong to us!"
     
  18. B. Sanders

    B. Sanders Guest

    "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > "Technician" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > (like i said, future, job search has not returned anything that makes any money yet).

    > > Where are you, and what kind of jobs are you looking for? What is your background and/or field
    > > of expertise?
    >
    > I'm in Farmington, Maine. I guess my background could be classified as electrical/mechanical
    > (scored top on electrical and mechanical on ASVAB) with very good strengths in computers. In these
    > fields, i am quite easily taught, so i am only marginally limited by current knowledge.
    >
    > Mechanically i can usually look at some sort of machine, and with a bit of time, and tools to open
    > 'er up for examination, i can have it pretty much figured out in a few hours. I have rebuilt a
    > 2-cycle motorcycle using the manual only for specific settings or torque.
    >
    > Electrically, i am the same way. i have re-wired my room several times to place an outlet where
    > needed, or to change an outlet over to a grounded one. I can also do well in the electronics end
    > of it. i have built several audio amplifiers, though i have yet to understand them fully, i can
    > read a schematic and generate a circuit from it with little difficulty (providing that i have
    > reference materials for any semiconductors).
    >
    > With computers, i may not know all there is to know, but i have a fairly broad area of knowledge.
    > i have a very good understanding of the scripting format, thus i can usually read and understand
    > most any script language enough to learn from it. Hardware is simple to me, it is nothing to swap
    > out a component whenever needed, and software is much the same. there are so many similarities
    > that most programs can be learned by simply working with it for a while.
    >
    > For the longest time, i had no idea what i wanted to do for a living. for a while i though i
    > enjoyed computers enough that i would like to be employed using them. I have since decided (while
    > building up the GT actually) that i much prefer mechanical work. i enjoy getting down and dirty
    > with tools and working with my hands. I just have to find the job that best fits this joy.

    Travis, you are an engineer without a degree to prove it. It's time for you to become enterprising.

    A story: The kind and generous fellow who taught me electronics theory and Boolean logic (when I was
    12) was very much like you in terms of background. As a young man, he started a business repairing
    electronic equipment. This turned into a career at Cessna Aircraft teaching avionics. That
    experience vaulted him into becoming the director of an artificial intelligence lab at Boeing. He
    never received a college degree. During his entire career he always did side jobs, such as voice
    work for the local radio station.

    Moral of the story: Broadly technical guys like you are golden. People always need something to be
    repaired: House repair, car repair, auto repair, bike repair, PC repair, appliance repair, teaching
    folks how to use Windows, MS Office, and much, much more. Heck, you could make a living out of just
    fixing screwed-up Windows PC's alone. How about setting up wireless networking (Wi-Fi) for the rich
    folks in the gated communities? Charge 'em plenty - they'll love wireless networking, and you'll get
    return business. (BTW: It's incredibly easy to setup, too.) This is a way for you to "leverage" your
    broad understanding of things technical. (I hate the word "leverage"; but it's appropriate.)

    Have some basic business cards printed up. Put the word out with flyers at the grocery store, or
    anywhere else people congregate (church?) What I think you'll find is that once you have a small
    base of satisfied customers, word of mouth will do the advertising for you. In a Walmart world,
    personal service is a rare find, and much needed. The elderly are especially needing of someone
    they can trust to help them. If you attend church, you may find that to be a good place to
    spread the word.

    When times are tough, and jobs are scarce or non-existent, being enterprising and versatile is the
    only way to stay afloat. Don't wait for existing companies to hire you - they're about to go under
    themselves.

    > A position has opened up at the local VIP (discount auto parts, aka crappy parts at a low price)
    > for a full-time tire changer. not sure exactly what it entails, but i figure it is worth a shot.

    It's hard work. My Dad was "the tire man" for a Mercedes dealership when he was in his late 20's. He
    loved the job. I'll bet it pays poorly, though.

    > a fairly recent (within the past 3 years) interest of mine is turbine jet engines. i would love to
    > work in this field, but the only positions available are at airports, and there is so much at
    > risk, that it kind of takes away from the job. now, assuming i got the needed training and the FAA
    > certification, it would be nice to be a jet engine mechanic for just a few small jet aircraft. but
    > i fear i don't have a good enough credit to apply for another student loan (mainly because i have
    > to keep deferring my last student loan).

    A good friend of mine did exactly this. He went to Spartan Engineering and got his AP certfication.
    He rented a space at a local airport, and had his own aircraft repair business for a while. It's
    good work; and pays well; but in a down economy, it's not clear how much work there is to do.
    Business jets are the first to go when the money gets tight.

    Be bold and be enterprising. You'll find helping people to be very rewarding. They'll *pay* you for
    those broad mechanical and technical aptitudes of yours.

    -Barry
     
  19. Spider

    Spider Guest

    Technician wrote:
    > <manic rambling>

    Shouldn't you be worrying about a job, instead of Disk brakes?? It's no wonder your
    unemployed........

    -Spider
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...