disk brakes..



hd reynolds

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Nov 15, 2005
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If by road bikes you mean the ones with skinny 700c tires... no because the frames on these will not accomodate discs... 1) there's no disc brake caliper mounting on the frames and fork and 2) disc specific hubs won't fit at the back.
 

dstfort

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Jul 16, 2007
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hd reynolds said:
If by road bikes you mean the ones with skinny 700c tires... no because the frames on these will not accomodate discs... 1) there's no disc brake caliper mounting on the frames and fork and 2) disc specific hubs won't fit at the back.
ok thx alot
 

alfeng

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Jul 23, 2005
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dstfort said:
i was wondering do any of you guys use disk brakes on your bikes?
You can get a LeMond POPRAD (cyclocross) bike (amongst others) if you want to run disc brakes with 700c wheels.
 

Rich8P

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Jul 21, 2006
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I'd love discs on my roadie and you can retro-mount disks using special mounting straps. The problem is that the fork bends too much on one side.


Take a look at Canyon on the internet. Do a search for project 6.8. They are experimenting with twin disks.
 

Powerful Pete

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May 29, 2004
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Rich8P said:
I'd love discs on my roadie and you can retro-mount disks using special mounting straps. The problem is that the fork bends too much on one side.


Take a look at Canyon on the internet. Do a search for project 6.8. They are experimenting with twin disks.
Are they really necessary? :confused: I do not see the point, I get plenty of stopping power from my good 'ole Campagnolos.
 

Rich8P

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dstfort said:
i was wondering do any of you guys use disk brakes on your bikes?
Assuming that you are talking about hydraulic disks, these are applicable to both road and MTB in my opinion. I've tried to list in order of importance.

1. If you wheel becomes "not round" during the ride then the chances are that you can get back. This can happen on the road if you hit a bump etc.

2. If it rains or gets dirty you can still stop without using a whole brake pad

3. When you brake at high speed, the disc is perfectly true so you don't get judder

4. Hydraulics are easier to 'dose' than cables but this is not limited to disks

5. You can take the wheel in and out without having to open the caliper so you can change it easier and faster

6. Disk brakes are self-adjusting so they always feel the same and you never need to tighten the cable
 

hd reynolds

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Rich8P said:
Assuming that you are talking about hydraulic disks, these are applicable to both road and MTB in my opinion. I've tried to list in order of importance.

1. If you wheel becomes "not round" during the ride then the chances are that you can get back. This can happen on the road if you hit a bump etc.

2. If it rains or gets dirty you can still stop without using a whole brake pad

3. When you brake at high speed, the disc is perfectly true so you don't get judder

4. Hydraulics are easier to 'dose' than cables but this is not limited to disks

5. You can take the wheel in and out without having to open the caliper so you can change it easier and faster

6. Disk brakes are self-adjusting so they always feel the same and you never need to tighten the cable
Hydraulic or mechanical disc are both not applicable for road bike use. See earlier post.

Also point no. 5 isnt true as they take as long as or longer to mount as calipered wheels. You still need to center the disc on the pads and with little tolerance in there it is very easy to hit one of the pads which really take time. Opening the caliper is juts a flick away so it is faster. If you've tried both you'll really know how it is.
 

Strumpetto

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Jul 13, 2007
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The XC hardtail I'm getting comes with juicy carbons. However, discs seem to be more of a luxury than a necessity.
 

hd reynolds

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Strumpetto said:
The XC hardtail I'm getting comes with juicy carbons. However, discs seem to be more of a luxury than a necessity.
Juicy carbons are a luxury. Even Deore now comes with hydraulics.. they're also cheaper. Tektro Gemini hydraulics are a lot cheaper.
 

sideshow_bob

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hd reynolds said:
Hydraulic or mechanical disc are both not applicable for road bike use. See earlier post.

They are only not applicable in as much as manufacturers today aren't producing components that support installation. Tomorrow that might be different. Some Cyclocross frames/forks are already supporting them, and rightly so as they are far superior off road to rim brakes.

Other valid reasons (that they are useful as opposed to rim brakes, and following on from the earlier poster) include:

a) Separating the braking surface from the rim. Meaning no rim wear
b) Ditto and compounded if applied to people swapping out carbon specific pads when they use carbon rimmed wheels
c) You can theoretically build a lighter and stronger rim when you dispose of the machined sidewall

AFAIK they are banned on road bikes participating in UCI events (which is all club racing in Australia and Europe) not to mention any pro events. This in and of itself (and I could be wrong about the rule) will probably kill any development.

--brett
 

hd reynolds

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sideshow_bob said:
They are only not applicable in as much as manufacturers today aren't producing components that support installation. Tomorrow that might be different. Some Cyclocross frames/forks are already supporting them, and rightly so as they are far superior off road to rim brakes.
--brett
Am not talking of what is possible tomorrow. Right now they are not applicable unless you custom build your frame and fork.
 

Insaneclimber

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Aug 21, 2006
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DISC BRAKES ARE HEAVY

and they do not give you more stopping power, disc brakes give good modulation something that is not needed on a road bike. Oh and if you realy want them on a road bike then just use a mtb frame and hubs, a 700c rim will fit easy. the front fork wont be very aero though, but then who cares.
 

sideshow_bob

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Insaneclimber said:
DISC BRAKES ARE HEAVY
You get some of that back in a disc specific rim which can be lighter. We already have bikes that are struggling to meet the UCI 6.8kg limit and that are being artificially weighted (a powertap or srm as an example). As materials evolve (and assuming the 6.8kg limit remains in place) there is every possibility that disc equipped bikes could be at or around that limit.

Disc brakes absolutely give better stopping power in certain situations. Wet / muddy etc etc.

--brett
 

Insaneclimber

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sideshow_bob said:
You get some of that back in a disc specific rim which can be lighter. We already have bikes that are struggling to meet the UCI 6.8kg limit and that are being artificially weighted (a powertap or srm as an example). As materials evolve (and assuming the 6.8kg limit remains in place) there is every possibility that disc equipped bikes could be at or around that limit.

Disc brakes absolutely give better stopping power in certain situations. Wet / muddy etc etc.

--brett
No disc brakes do not give better stopping power, think about it a rim brake has the ability to lockup and skid the wheel, so how then do disc brakes improve tyre traction, they dont do they, disc brakes are more powerful but the governing factor here is tyre traction. and last time i tried my "you beauty" v brakes in wet muddy conditions they locked the wheel too? Disc brakes give better modulation ( for dummies that means better feel)
 

Rich8P

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Jul 21, 2006
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Insaneclimber said:
DISC BRAKES ARE HEAVY
Are you sure?

I've MTB Magura disks according to internet: weight 747g per pair including levers and cables...

...and a pair of Ultegra at 335g for the brakes and 490g for the levers (couldn't find the weight of the cable). Perhaps the comparison isn't fair because the Ultregra include a gear control.

I just looked this up on the internet so perhaps the numbers need checking.

Canyon have a prototype 6.8kg bike with twin front disks.

I'd have thought that disks are heavier, hence all the MTB racers have V-brakes in the dry but would be interested in the evidence.
 

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