Ditchling Beacon

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Andy B, Apr 19, 2003.

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  1. Andy B

    Andy B Guest

    The london to brighton cycle ride takes in Ditchling Beacon. I've never done this ride before but
    years ago i was down at Ditchling Beacon watching a classic race. All i remember is that it's a
    right steep hill. Can someone give me an insight to tackling it? I'm now trying to get in as much
    hill practice as I can beforehand.

    Andy
     
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  2. John B

    John B Guest

    Andy B wrote:

    > The london to brighton cycle ride takes in Ditchling Beacon. I've never done this ride before but
    > years ago i was down at Ditchling Beacon watching a classic race. All i remember is that it's a
    > right steep hill. Can someone give me an insight to tackling it? I'm now trying to get in as much
    > hill practice as I can beforehand.

    Don't be overawed by its undeserved reputation and just ride up within yourself. If that means
    walking do so. The biggest problem will be other riders either walking up or weaving all over the
    road, which may force you to stop and/or walk anyway.

    I wouldn't bother with specific "hill practice" for Ditchling, but some slow bike manoevering skills
    and rapid unclipping (if you use clips or spds) will certainly come in handy.

    Enjoy the ride.

    John B
     
  3. Andy B

    Andy B Guest

    John B <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Andy B wrote:
    >
    > > The london to brighton cycle ride takes in Ditchling Beacon. I've never done this ride before
    > > but years ago i was down at Ditchling Beacon watching a classic race. All i remember is that
    > > it's a right steep hill. Can someone give me an insight to tackling it? I'm now trying to get in
    > > as much hill practice as I can beforehand.
    >
    > Don't be overawed by its undeserved reputation and just ride up within yourself. If that means
    > walking do so. The biggest problem will be other riders either walking up or weaving all over the
    > road, which may force you to stop and/or walk anyway.
    >
    > I wouldn't bother with specific "hill practice" for Ditchling, but some slow bike manoevering
    > skills and rapid unclipping (if you use clips or spds) will certainly come in handy.
    >
    > Enjoy the ride.
    >
    > John B

    Thanks John. I'm looking forward to it now.
     
  4. Martin

    Martin Guest

    .
    > >
    > > I wouldn't bother with specific "hill practice" for Ditchling, but some slow bike manoevering
    > > skills and rapid unclipping (if you use clips or spds) will certainly come in handy.
    > >
    > > Enjoy the ride.
    > >

    The worst bit is until you are out of the wooded bit at the first LH bend, after that you can
    pace yourself.If you can stay in the saddle there will be dozens of other riders cheering you on
    at the top.I've even seen riders pushing an ice cream bike full of ice tea with their bikes on
    the top of it up with the rider pedalling for all his worth! When you reach the top the
    atmosphere is electric,hundreds of bikes riders and an ice cream van and a fantastic descent into
    Brighton Enjoy!!!
     
  5. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    "Andy B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > John B <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Andy B wrote:
    > >
    > > > The london to brighton cycle ride takes in Ditchling Beacon. I've never done this ride before
    > > > but years ago i was down at Ditchling Beacon watching a classic race. All i remember is that
    > > > it's a right steep hill. Can someone give me an insight to tackling it? I'm now trying to get
    > > > in as much hill practice as I can beforehand.

    Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the chance to
    'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the steeper bits. And
    even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even then, it's only that for a
    short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If you want a *real* hill, try Titsey
    Hill in the North Downs.

    --
    Akin

    aknak at aksoto dot idps dot co dot uk
     
  6. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the chance
    > to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the steeper bits.
    > And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even then, it's only that
    > for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If you want a *real* hill,
    > try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    >
    I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come down so I'll extend my route a
    few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).

    I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs hill which I found difficult to
    walk up, let alone ride .
     
  7. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the
    > > chance to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the
    > > steeper bits. And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even then,
    > > it's only that for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If you want
    > > a *real* hill, try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    > >
    > I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come down
    so
    > I'll extend my route a few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).
    >
    > I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs hill which I found difficult to
    > walk up, let alone ride .

    Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was only able
    to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I mention Titsey
    ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.

    If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you because
    no overtaking is allowed.

    Out of curiosity, where do you come down the Downs?

    --
    Akin

    aknak at aksoto dot idps dot co dot uk
     
  8. Mark Parsons

    Mark Parsons Guest

    > Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was only
    > able to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I mention
    > Titsey ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.
    >
    > If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you because
    > no overtaking is allowed.
    >

    in a moment of madness i did reach 57mph going down Titsey hill... totally irresponsible i know and
    wouldnt do it now as the road surface is just terrible. but an absolute bugger to get up, i always
    skirt around it via pilgrims way and come up the longer but less steep route on the right (if going
    up Titsey hill) hand side.

    mark
     
  9. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the
    > > > chance to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the
    > > > steeper bits. And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even
    > > > then, it's only that for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If
    > > > you want a *real* hill, try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    > > >
    > > I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come
    down
    > so
    > > I'll extend my route a few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).
    > >
    > > I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs hill which I found difficult
    > > to walk up, let alone ride .
    >
    > Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was only
    > able to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I mention
    > Titsey ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.
    >
    > If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you because
    > no overtaking is allowed.
    >
    > Out of curiosity, where do you come down the Downs?
    >
    >

    Recently I have been coming down Sundridge Hill (few cars, but slow), not because its good to come
    down but because it suits the rest of my cicuit, I go back home up a very easy route (with virtually
    no cars) in the east past Shoreham called Chelsfield lane.
     
  10. Sky Fly

    Sky Fly Guest

    "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the
    > > > > chance to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the
    > > > > steeper bits. And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even
    > > > > then, it's only that for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If
    > > > > you want a *real* hill, try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    > > > >
    > > > I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come
    > down
    > > so
    > > > I'll extend my route a few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).
    > > >
    > > > I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs
    hill
    > > > which I found difficult to walk up, let alone ride .
    > >
    > > Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was only
    > > able to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I
    > > mention Titsey ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.
    > >
    > > If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you
    > > because no overtaking is allowed.
    > >
    > > Out of curiosity, where do you come down the Downs?
    > >
    > >
    >
    > Recently I have been coming down Sundridge Hill (few cars, but slow), not because its good to come
    > down but because it suits the rest of my cicuit, I go back home up a very easy route (with
    > virtually no cars) in the east past Shoreham called Chelsfield lane.

    When you say it's 'slow', what do you mean? I thought that all the lanes east of Westerham Hill
    (Hogtrough, Brasted, Sundridge Hills) were all 'single arrow' hills and therefore guaranteed a fast
    downhill run... or do you mean it's too twisty and narrow to go fast?

    Akin
     
  11. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >
    > > > "Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > > >
    > > > > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > >
    > > > > > Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the
    > > > > > chance to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the
    > > > > > steeper bits. And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even
    > > > > > then, it's only that for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite.
    > > > > > If you want a *real* hill, try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    > > > > >
    > > > > I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come
    > > down
    > > > so
    > > > > I'll extend my route a few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).
    > > > >
    > > > > I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs
    > hill
    > > > > which I found difficult to walk up, let alone ride .
    > > >
    > > > Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was
    > > > only able to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I
    > > > mention Titsey ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.
    > > >
    > > > If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you
    > > > because no overtaking is allowed.
    > > >
    > > > Out of curiosity, where do you come down the Downs?
    > > >
    > > >
    > >
    > > Recently I have been coming down Sundridge Hill (few cars, but slow), not because its good to
    > > come down but because it suits the rest of my cicuit, I go back home up a very easy route (with
    > > virtually no cars) in the east past Shoreham called Chelsfield lane.
    >
    > When you say it's 'slow', what do you mean? I thought that all the lanes east of Westerham Hill
    > (Hogtrough, Brasted, Sundridge Hills) were all 'single arrow' hills and therefore guaranteed a
    > fast downhill run... or do you mean it's too twisty and narrow to go fast?
    >
    Yep, too narrow, too twisty, too steep, I couldn't stop if anything was coming from the opposite
    directions, so its full on the brakes.

    > Akin
     
  12. Cr

    Cr Guest

    Also you've got to give way at the Pilgrims Way junctions. Don't forget Chalkpit Hill but I reckon
    the mother of all hills is York's Hill (up from Bough Beech Reservoir, west of Sevenoaks)

    Frank wrote:

    > "Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>"Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>"Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>
    >>>>"Frank" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>>
    >>>>>"Sky Fly" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Also, DB isn't a straight long steep slope - it's a series of 'steps', so you will get the
    >>>>>>chance to 'rest' in between the more strenuous bursts of efforts you use in getting up the
    >>>>>>steeper bits. And even then, at its steepest, I don't think it's more than 18% - and even
    >>>>>>then, it's only that for a short section. So yes - it's really much bark but little bite. If
    >>>>>>you want a *real* hill, try Titsey Hill in the North Downs.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>I've not tried Titsey Hill . (Its just West of where I normally come
    >>>>>
    >>>down
    >>>
    >>>>so
    >>>>
    >>>>>I'll extend my route a few km's, to give it a look the easy way ).
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I can remember finding a road near there call (I think?) Succombs
    >>>>>
    >>hill
    >>
    >>>>>which I found difficult to walk up, let alone ride .
    >>>>>
    >>>>Ah. Succombs Hill - at 25%, that's the steepest hill I know of near the London area. I was only
    >>>>able to make it up the hill on my bike after two unsuccessful attempts. The only reason I
    >>>>mention Titsey ahead of Succombs is because Titsey is longer.
    >>>>
    >>>>If you do try Titsey Hill, the major irritant is that cars tend to drive very close to you
    >>>>because no overtaking is allowed.
    >>>>
    >>>>Out of curiosity, where do you come down the Downs?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>Recently I have been coming down Sundridge Hill (few cars, but slow), not because its good to
    >>>come down but because it suits the rest of my cicuit, I go back home up a very easy route (with
    >>>virtually no cars) in the east past Shoreham called Chelsfield lane.
    >>>
    >>When you say it's 'slow', what do you mean? I thought that all the lanes east of Westerham Hill
    >>(Hogtrough, Brasted, Sundridge Hills) were all 'single arrow' hills and therefore guaranteed a
    >>fast downhill run... or do you mean it's too twisty and narrow to go fast?
    >>
    >>
    > Yep, too narrow, too twisty, too steep, I couldn't stop if anything was coming from the opposite
    > directions, so its full on the brakes.
    >
    >
    >
    >>Akin
    >>
    >>
    >>
     
  13. Congokid

    Congokid Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy B
    <[email protected]> writes
    >The london to brighton cycle ride takes in Ditchling Beacon. I've never done this ride before but
    >years ago i was down at Ditchling Beacon watching a classic race. All i remember is that it's a
    >right steep hill. Can someone give me an insight to tackling it? I'm now trying to get in as much
    >hill practice as I can beforehand.

    I managed it on my first attempt at the London-Brighton ride in 1988 without any previous practice.
    I was standing on the pedals in lowest gear for most of the way, and was puce by the time I reached
    the top. That was a particularly hot day.

    I tried again a few years later but only got about a third of the way before my path was blocked
    by cyclists walking up and I had to dismount. Doubt very much if I could do it now, even with a
    clear path.

    --
    congokid Eating out in London? Read my tips... http://congokid.com
     
  14. On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 18:25:24 +0100, contributor Cr had scribed:
    > I reckon the mother of all hills is York's Hill (up from Bough Beech Reservoir, west of Sevenoaks)
    >

    Nah, Rosedale Chimney Bank in the North York Moors. Beware of the sheep on the descent! Even Milk
    Race/Kellogg's Tour riders have been known to walk this one.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  15. Gary Knighton wrote:

    > Nah, Rosedale Chimney Bank in the North York Moors. Beware of the sheep on the descent! Even Milk
    > Race/Kellogg's Tour riders have been known to walk this one.

    Silly FOREIGNERS, that is. "Pah!", they exclaimed, inna-Continental-stylee. "There are no mountains
    in England!". The locals, meanwhile, had fitted sensible gears for that stage, weaved through the
    mass of collapsing Europeans and pedestrians and scarpered.

    How we larfed.

    The bitsteepfulness of The Devil's Staircase in mid-Wales is terrific, and harsh words have beeen
    said of Hard Knott and Wrynose passes in the Lakes and the climb up from the beach at Robin
    Hood's Bay.

    Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  16. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Dave Larrington <[email protected]> wrote:

    : The bitsteepfulness of The Devil's Staircase in mid-Wales is terrific, and harsh words have beeen
    : said of Hard Knott and Wrynose passes in the Lakes and the climb up from the beach at Robin
    : Hood's Bay.

    Only ever walked the last one (while staying in the nearby YH). It's hard to walk up in even MTB
    cycling shoes :)

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  17. On Tue, 27 May 2003 15:21:48 +0100, contributor Dave Larrington had scribed:
    > Silly FOREIGNERS, that is. "Pah!", they exclaimed, inna-Continental-stylee. "There are no
    > mountains in England!". The locals, meanwhile, had fitted sensible gears for that stage, weaved
    > through the mass of collapsing Europeans and pedestrians and scarpered.
    >
    > How we larfed.
    >
    > The bitsteepfulness of The Devil's Staircase in mid-Wales is terrific, and harsh words have beeen
    > said of Hard Knott and Wrynose passes in the Lakes and the climb up from the beach at Robin
    > Hood's Bay.
    >

    Funny enough there were a few walkers up Garrowby Hill (a tame 1 in 6, which some of us locals rode
    up earlier after meeting up at Thixendale, a few 1 in ever so lows around there) during a Milk Race
    stage over a decade ago.

    Gary

    --

    The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.

    For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
     
  18. Bert Smith

    Bert Smith Guest

    Yorks Hill, whilst steep, is not the steepest or longest in the hills West of Sevenoaks This is
    (according to the road sign) a maximum of 16%. I think that the steepest is Downe Road
    (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=544315&Y=160085&A=Y&Z=3), near Biggin Hill, which
    is 25%, though only for a short way. White Hill Lane
    (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=546970&Y=151500&A=Y&Z=3) near Caterham must be
    similar, and is longer. For steep and long, Chalk Lane
    (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=538240&Y=154680&A=Y&Z=3), North from Oxted, which
    is 20% (steeper than Yorks Hill), or Toys Hill
    (http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=546970&Y=151500&A=Y&Z=3), which is probably
    slightly less.

    However, none of these hills rise more than 200m from the plain, so they are not too painful, but
    all harder than Ditchling Beacon, in my opinion.

    I avoid going up Titsey Hill - there is far too much traffic, and so many other hills.

    "Gary Knighton" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 18:25:24 +0100, contributor Cr had scribed:
    > > I reckon the mother of all hills is York's Hill (up from Bough Beech Reservoir, west of
    > > Sevenoaks)
    > >
    >
    > Nah, Rosedale Chimney Bank in the North York Moors. Beware of the sheep on the descent! Even Milk
    > Race/Kellogg's Tour riders have been known to walk this one.
    >
    > Gary
    >
    > --
    >
    > The email address is for newsgroups purposes only and therefore unlikely to be read.
    >
    > For contact via email use my real name with an underscore separator at the domain of CompuServe.
    >
    >

    Gary Knighton <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 20 Apr 2003 18:25:24 +0100, contributor Cr had scribed:
    > > I reckon the mother of all hills is York's Hill (up from Bough Beech Reservoir, west of
    > > Sevenoaks)
    > >
    >
    > Nah, Rosedale Chimney Bank in the North York Moors. Beware of the sheep on the descent! Even Milk
    > Race/Kellogg's Tour riders have been known to walk this one.
    >
    > Gary
     
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