DIY burger meat - drift from another thread

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Melba's Jammin', Jan 30, 2005.

  1. In article <[email protected]>, Don Gray
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > In article Don Gray wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I do have a 'foody query' though, as an aside. I have to say here and
    > > > now I am not one for visiting 'burger bars'. It's not the sort of
    > > > meal that turns me on - maybe they're better quality in the US. Over
    > > > here good quality meat costs an arm and a leg, but my wife loves
    > > > them. So I bought 1¾lb prime beef, which cost me 15euros, about £10
    > > > or about 20$ US (that's guessing). Anyhow, I'll grind it up myself. I
    > > > have a 'burger book' but just wondered if anyone had any favourite
    > > > ideas. I will also be doing plain ones.

    > >
    > > > Thanks
    > > >
    > > > Don

    > >
    > > Whatever floats your boat, Don, but for grinding my own meat for a
    > > burger, I'd be buying a cut of meat that was less tender and more
    > > flavorful. Cheaper, too. :) I like my burgers relatively plain
    > > -- maybe with some finely chopped onion mixed into the meat with
    > > some s&p.
    > >
    > > Grilled and accompanied by ketchup and mustard and maybe a pickle.

    >
    > Thanks for the advice M J - it's taken on board. I did consider a
    > cheaper cut, for I'm used to making do and adapting what I've got to
    > produce diffeent dishes eg casseroles - but I just thought 'treat'
    > and it just stuck in the old brain cells ;-)
    > Don


    I love treats -- to me, a treat would be having that swell slab of prime
    meat prepared in such a way as to properly enhance and show off its
    treatly attributes, and grinding it for a burger wouldn't do it for me.
    Not trying to be contentious, sir, just continuing a friendly
    conversation.
    --
    -Barb, <www.jamlady.eboard.com> Winter Carnival ice sculpture pics
    added 1-30-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
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  2. Don Gray

    Don Gray Guest

    In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article Don Gray wrote:
    >
    > > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > > Whatever floats your boat, Don, but for grinding my own meat for a
    > > > burger, I'd be buying a cut of meat that was less tender and more
    > > > flavorful. Cheaper, too. :) I like my burgers relatively plain --
    > > > maybe with some finely chopped onion mixed into the meat with some
    > > > s&p.
    > > > Grilled and accompanied by ketchup and mustard and maybe a pickle.

    > >
    > > Thanks for the advice M J - it's taken on board. I did consider a
    > > cheaper cut, for I'm used to making do and adapting what I've got to
    > > produce diffeent dishes eg casseroles - but I just thought 'treat' and
    > > it just stuck in the old brain cells ;-) Don

    >
    > I love treats -- to me, a treat would be having that swell slab of prime
    > meat prepared in such a way as to properly enhance and show off its
    > treatly attributes, and grinding it for a burger wouldn't do it for me.
    > Not trying to be contentious, sir, just continuing a friendly
    > conversation.


    Sorry for delay ia answering. We took off for a couple of days. I couldn't
    agree more with the your view about the 'prime meat'. I'll mention 2 points
    which may clarify the situation.

    1. My dear wife had already bought burger-sized bread rolls which have been
    in the freezer, wasting space for longer than I care to remember. I wanted
    shut of them as I do most of our cooking and freezing.

    2. I have never, ever eaten a burger, as either child or adult, but advice I
    seemed to recall on TV advised 'prime meat. So much for cooks!

    3. I just love to try cooking something different to ring in the changes and
    she specified an interest in trying home-made burgers.

    Simplistic I know, but that's me. Thanks again.

    Don


    --
    Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Don Gray
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > In article Don Gray wrote:

    (snippage)
    > > I love treats -- to me, a treat would be having that swell slab of
    > > prime meat prepared in such a way as to properly enhance and show
    > > off its treatly attributes, and grinding it for a burger wouldn't
    > > do it for me.

    (snip)
    >
    > 1. My dear wife had already bought burger-sized bread rolls
    > 2. I have never, ever eaten a burger, as either child or adult,
    > 3. I just love to try cooking something different
    >
    > Simplistic I know, but that's me. Thanks again.
    > Don


    Nothng bad about being simplistic -- keeps things uncomplicated. :)
    so, how were they?
    --
    -Barb
    <www.jamlady.eboard.com>; Tater Tot Hotdish and Jam Class pics added 2-2-05
    "I got the motive, which is money; and the body, which is dead!" - Rod
    Steiger as Sheriff Gillespie, "In the Heat of the Night," 1967.
     
  4. Don Gray

    Don Gray Guest

    In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article, Don Gray wrote:
    >
    > > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article Don Gray wrote:

    > (snippage)
    > > > I love treats -- to me, a treat would be having that swell slab of
    > > > prime meat prepared in such a way as to properly enhance and show
    > > > off its treatly attributes, and grinding it for a burger wouldn't
    > > > do it for me.

    > (snip)
    > >
    > > 1. My dear wife had already bought burger-sized bread rolls
    > > 2. I have never, ever eaten a burger, as either child or adult,
    > > 3. I just love to try cooking something different
    > >
    > > Simplistic I know, but that's me. Thanks again.
    > > Don

    >
    > Nothng bad about being simplistic -- keeps things uncomplicated. :)
    > so, how were they?


    I just hate to say this, in a mainly American group, but they were just like
    a common or garden, thick, beef sandwich, much over-rated, and to be honest -
    not worth the effort, but SWMBO thought they were great - so who am I to
    complain?? She also defiled them by using tomato sauce as a dressing. It may
    be contentious, but over here we tend to use brown sauces with meat. I don't
    mind but there's no accounting for taste, is there ;-)

    Just to stir it up I'd say - for a snack, "Give me a pork pie any day of the
    week". Does any butcher over there make and sell pork pies - or are they not
    part of the 'daily grind?' I know that lamb's not popular, but maybe pork has
    got its own place. I like to keep an open mind on foods but I think that
    we're all dogged by the way we were brought up. I, for example, love fish &
    chips and the very smell, when passing a Fish & Chip shop sets me
    'drooling'. Am I simply one of Pavlov's dogs?

    Don

    --
    Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus
     
  5. On Fri 04 Feb 2005 11:59:05a, Don Gray wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >> In article, Don Gray wrote:
    >>
    >> > In message Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > In article Don Gray wrote: (snippage)
    >> > > I love treats -- to me, a treat would be having that swell slab of
    >> > > prime meat prepared in such a way as to properly enhance and show
    >> > > off its treatly attributes, and grinding it for a burger wouldn't
    >> > > do it for me.

    >> (snip)
    >> >
    >> > 1. My dear wife had already bought burger-sized bread rolls
    >> > 2. I have never, ever eaten a burger, as either child or adult, 3. I
    >> > just love to try cooking something different
    >> >
    >> > Simplistic I know, but that's me. Thanks again.
    >> > Don

    >>
    >> Nothng bad about being simplistic -- keeps things uncomplicated. :)
    >> so, how were they?

    >
    > I just hate to say this, in a mainly American group, but they were just
    > like a common or garden, thick, beef sandwich, much over-rated, and to
    > be honest - not worth the effort, but SWMBO thought they were great - so
    > who am I to complain?? She also defiled them by using tomato sauce as a
    > dressing. It may be contentious, but over here we tend to use brown
    > sauces with meat. I don't mind but there's no accounting for taste, is
    > there ;-)


    I would expect a non-USian to think hamburgers are overrated, but they are
    ubiquitous here, and really good burgers can't be beat. Having said that,
    and having gone down this road before, a really great burger needs to be
    made from a less tender cut of beef with higher fat content. For best
    flavor and juiciness, there should be 20-27% fat (a ratio that is commonly
    available in our markets). IMHO, they are also best cooked over an open
    flame, be it gas or charcoal. What you fixed for your wife is a burger I
    would not care to eat.

    > Just to stir it up I'd say - for a snack, "Give me a pork pie any day of
    > the week". Does any butcher over there make and sell pork pies - or are
    > they not part of the 'daily grind?' I know that lamb's not popular, but
    > maybe pork has got its own place. I like to keep an open mind on foods
    > but I think that we're all dogged by the way we were brought up. I, for
    > example, love fish & chips and the very smell, when passing a Fish &
    > Chip shop sets me 'drooling'. Am I simply one of Pavlov's dogs?


    Pork pies are virtually none existent in our US shops. I've had them and I
    love them, but I can't say that for the general populace who, for the most
    part have neither heard of them nor eaten them. I also love lamb, and some
    of its favored forms in the US are roasted leg, braised shanks, or grilled
    chops. As you suggest, however, it's not nearly as popular as beef and
    pork. Pork is very popular here, as barbeque, roasted cuts, grilled chops,
    and sausage. Fish and Chip shops exist in their own form here in the US,
    and have their own devotees, but they are no competition for our burger
    joints. Fish tacos have a certain popularity in the southerwestern US.

    I would agree it is a cultural thing. Neither your nor our popular foods
    would find that level of popularity in, say, India or China.

    Cheers!
    Wayne
     
  6. Don Gray

    Don Gray Guest

    In message Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > Don Gray wrote
    >
    > > I just hate to say this, in a mainly American group, but they were just
    > > like a common or garden, thick, beef sandwich, much over-rated, and to be
    > > honest - not worth the effort I don't mind but there's no accounting for
    > > taste, is there ;-)

    >
    > I would expect a non-USian to think hamburgers are overrated, but they are
    > ubiquitous here, and really good burgers can't be beat. Having said that,
    > and having gone down this road before, a really great burger needs to be
    > made from a less tender cut of beef with higher fat content. For best
    > flavor and juiciness, there should be 20-27% fat (a ratio that is commonly
    > available in our markets). IMHO, they are also best cooked over an open
    > flame, be it gas or charcoal. What you fixed for your wife is a burger I
    > would not care to eat.
    >

    Correct! and neither did I ;-) That's why I originally asked here for help. I
    love beef in most of its forms - but more importantly I love to experiment
    with and extend my cooking experience. Its a hobby with me since I retired.
    MJ helpfully suggested cheaper cuts of meat for flavour. I've now taken that
    onboard. I do make and enjoy many meals using minced meat, particularly
    casseroles and pies eg. cottage. An essential feature of many is the gravy or
    sauce. I use my own stocks. With the burger concept I was sort of stuck. I'll
    get the hang of it with practice. I'll just work on it.
    >
    > > Just to stir it up I'd say - for a snack, "Give me a pork pie any day of
    > > the week". Does any butcher over there make and sell pork pies - or are
    > > they not part of the 'daily grind?' I know that lamb's not popular, but
    > > maybe pork has got its own place. I like to keep an open mind on foods
    > > but I think that we're all dogged by the way we were brought up.

    >
    > Pork pies are virtually none existent in our US shops. I've had them and I
    > love them, but I can't say that for the general populace who, for the most
    > part have neither heard of them nor eaten them. I also love lamb, and some
    > of its favored forms in the US are roasted leg, braised shanks, or grilled
    > chops. As you suggest, however, it's not nearly as popular as beef and
    > pork. Pork is very popular here, as barbeque, roasted cuts, grilled chops,
    > and sausage.
    >
    > I would agree it is a cultural thing. Neither your nor our popular foods
    > would find that level of popularity in, say, India or China.
    >

    I think that you would get a shock if you visited our burger joints - but
    they are popular with the undescerning youth. They also tend to use neferious
    practices to keep wages unrealistically low. One underhand one was to clock
    the young workers off at certain times of the day, when trade is slack. They
    stay on the premises till trade picks up. Sheer exploitation. Indian, Thai
    and Chinese take-aways are gradually taking over. Thanks for the advice.

    Cheers, Don

    --
    Draco Dormiens Nunquam Titillandus
     
  7. blake murphy

    blake murphy Guest

    On Fri, 04 Feb 2005 18:59:05 GMT, Don Gray <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I just hate to say this, in a mainly American group, but they were just like
    >a common or garden, thick, beef sandwich, much over-rated, and to be honest -
    >not worth the effort, but SWMBO thought they were great - so who am I to
    >complain?? She also defiled them by using tomato sauce as a dressing. It may
    >be contentious, but over here we tend to use brown sauces with meat. I don't
    >mind but there's no accounting for taste, is there ;-)
    >
    >Don


    if by 'tomato sauce' you mean what americans call ketchup, this is
    entirely proper. i like ketchup, coarse-grained mustard, and a slice
    of raw onion. make sure to toast the buns.

    your pal,
    blake
     
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