DIY tire removal

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by G.Daniels, Jan 31, 2003.

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  1. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    around twice and work the tire massage bead in to the opposite side of the nipple! holding tire
    vertically pull up on that opposite side while holding tire down litely with the foot.pull pul pull
    then place the first lever in at that pull spot and fix it to a spoke with the tools's crook then
    work the bead in and around and toward that lever again! the repeat bead in and move around with the
    lever's help at the other side is trick. lube the tire's leading edge bead with wax/tef and stick
    the tool in and gently pry the bead out. put another tool in just ahead of the last tool fixing each
    to a spoke. remove the middle tool and place it under the bead and just over the rim and pry that
    small section of tire bead out.repeat.repeat until the bead no longer resists and will leave the
    tire rim with a finger under the bead.I write from experience. Never assume the bead is in, make
    sure the bead is in. the odds are that the problem is the mechanic's not the manufacturer.
     
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  2. In article <[email protected]>,
    g.daniels <[email protected]> wrote:
    >try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    >around twice and work the tire massage bead

    I hadn't heard of people putting wax on a tire bead til yesterday when I read on a
    Panaracer tire box:

    Caution
    * Do not use oil or wax when mounting a tire on a rim. Using oil or was will make the tire unstable
    and endanger the rider.

    I'm not saying it's true or anything, I was just surprised to learn that someone might oil or wax a
    tire before installation. And then here you are.

    --Paul
     
  3. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Cky_9.31495$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > g.daniels <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    > >around twice and work the tire massage bead
    >
    > I hadn't heard of people putting wax on a tire bead til yesterday when I read on a Panaracer
    > tire box:
    >
    > Caution
    > * Do not use oil or wax when mounting a tire on a rim. Using oil or was will make the tire
    > unstable and endanger the rider.
    >
    >
    > I'm not saying it's true or anything, I was just surprised to learn that someone might oil or wax
    > a tire before installation. And then here you are.
    >
    > --Paul

    The only slippery thing used with tires I've heard of is dishwashing soap.

    Mike
     
  4. In article <[email protected]>, Michael Dart <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >"Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:Cky_9.31495$A%[email protected]...
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> g.daniels <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in
    >> >all around twice and work the tire massage bead
    >>
    >> I hadn't heard of people putting wax on a tire bead til yesterday when I read on a Panaracer
    >> tire box:
    >>
    >> Caution
    >> * Do not use oil or wax when mounting a tire on a rim. Using oil or was will make the tire
    >> unstable and endanger the rider.
    >>
    >>
    >> I'm not saying it's true or anything, I was just surprised to learn that someone might oil or wax
    >> a tire before installation. And then here you are.
    >>
    >> --Paul
    >
    >The only slippery thing used with tires I've heard of is dishwashing soap.

    Yeah but I don't know anyone who soaps to get the bead on, that is generally only used to correct
    seating after the tire is on the rim (badly). I think soap would make it harder to get the bead on.

    --Paul
     
  5. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "g.daniels" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    > around twice and work the tire massage bead in to the opposite side of the nipple! holding tire
    > vertically pull up on that opposite side...............................I write from
    experience. Never
    > assume the bead is in, make sure the bead is in. the odds are that the problem is the mechanic's
    > not the manufacturer.

    If you are having that much trouble it must be an old Trek Matrix rim. The most effective mounting
    technique was a new rim. They must have all been oversized. FWIW I've never had difficulty mounting
    a tire to a Mavic rim. Bill Brannon
     
  6. Scic

    Scic Guest

    >From: "Bill"

    >FWIW I've never had difficulty mounting a tire to a Mavic rim.

    Hmm... I have no trouble with CXP10s but a great deal of effort is required to mount several brands
    of tires on the CXP21s.

    Sig Chicago
     
  7. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Cky_9.31495$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > g.daniels <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >try teflon wax on the bead before assembly then lube both leading bead and tool end. pinch in all
    > >around twice and work the tire massage bead
    >
    > I hadn't heard of people putting wax on a tire bead til yesterday when I read on a Panaracer
    > tire box:
    >
    > Caution
    > * Do not use oil or wax when mounting a tire on a rim. Using oil or was will make the tire
    > unstable and endanger the rider.
    >
    >
    > I'm not saying it's true or anything, I was just surprised to learn that someone might oil or wax
    > a tire before installation. And then here you are.

    We commonly use Pledge or similar to mount tires both when a tight fit and on badly sized rims (like
    the classic Chicago Schwinn steel rims, which are frequently large or small and a bitch to mount a
    tire on straight). Never had any problems with that and we've done it _a lot_ and for a long time.

    I remember a shipment of bicycles which arrived with shredded inner tubes. The explanation we got
    was that the tires had been mounted with a spray oil at the assembler. Seems possible.

    I once over-oiled a new three speed hub with a freshly mounted tubular and in the morning the tire
    was bulged where the oil had saturated the casing. So I know oil isn't good for tires, but wax
    always seemed innocuous.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >We commonly use Pledge or similar to mount tires both when a tight fit and on badly sized rims
    >(like the classic Chicago Schwinn steel rims, which are frequently large or small and a bitch to
    >mount a tire on straight). Never had any problems with that and we've done it _a lot_ and for a
    >long time.

    So you spray Pledge on it to help you get the bead over the wall or is your purpose to simply assist
    in seating after the tire is already on the rim?

    --Paul
     
  9. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > In article <[email protected]>, A Muzi <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >We commonly use Pledge or similar to mount tires both when a tight fit
    and
    > >on badly sized rims (like the classic Chicago Schwinn steel rims, which
    are
    > >frequently large or small and a bitch to mount a tire on straight).
    Never
    > >had any problems with that and we've done it _a lot_ and for a long time.

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hKS_9.31638$A%[email protected]...
    > So you spray Pledge on it to help you get the bead over the wall or is your purpose to simply
    > assist in seating after the tire is already on the rim?

    It helps both. Spray with the nozzle inside the rim channel while the wheel is spinning so you don't
    get wax on the brake surface.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  10. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    Let the teflon wax dry before mounting. DRY! the stuff is excellent on tent zippers and sleeping bag
    zippers. DRY! Tire mounting and removal is basic. Ah!butnthere are several different levers ELDI
    plastic-cheap and an excellent hook to pry, hook to a spoke and hold the bead open while seeking
    another purchase.

    Eldi steel-never used one but it exists. some people like steel.

    Park plastic or nylon- an excellent set to work with the eldi holding the bead open after the mech.
    again pushes the bead toward the opening lever with the unhooked Park lever end slipping into the
    bead/rim space with more ease than the Eldi. Park's are more difficult to use as a "bead kept open"
    tool where the Eldi's are excellent. Using both makes the tightdismount simpler, used by Parkself
    moves the mech toward tiddleywinks rather than tire changing.

    Zefal(ZEEEEEEEEEEEEEE' faul) has a nice Eldi style lever but more to the Park flexible material.

    BR(bicycle research) has a tire tool.Visit BR's website.

    And there are two LEVERS!! the "quick stick" haven't seen one yet. And the Eldi pro tire shop leber
    at 160mm in steel. the quick comes in plastic!

    Last but not thersa VAR HIGH PRESSURE TIRE LEVER with a unique wishbone design!
     
  11. G.Daniels

    G.Daniels Guest

    the plastic Eldi's may be demeferos or deferos or... inexpensive but durable if one doesn't lean on
    them to hard
     
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