do chain breakers work on both 3/32 and 1/8 or are there different sized chain breakers?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Milton Baker, Dec 23, 2010.

  1. Milton Baker

    Milton Baker New Member

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    i need a chain breaker but im not sure what size my chain is. i was wondering if a chain breaker needs to be the specific chain size or if one can be used on both 3/32 and 1/8.
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    I've used my Park chain breaker on every chain I've ever come across with zero issues, so I'd say that you are good to go - if you are using a quality tool. The department store breaker I started with only succeeded in breaking itself.
     
  3. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Most if not all chain breakers will work for any sized chain.
     
  4. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. An older chain tool (e.g., CYCLO) designed for 5-and-6-speed chains will probably be "okay" to push a pin (aka "rivet") out, but I believe that the casting is not robust enough if you want to use the tool to set the rivet back in place.

    I use a LIFU chain tool ... it is capable of setting the ORIGINAL pin back in place on a 9-speed Shimano chain (vs. the one-time-use installation pins) without distorting the plates -- I presume that it will work on a 10-speed Shimano & 11-speed Campagnolo chain, but it has not been tested on either.

    I do not use any of the "quick links" which came with some some chains (e.g., SRAM) even though I probably should for the chains that come with them.

    Because the LIFU chain tool can be used with a 5-speed chain, I am sure it will work with a 1/8" chain, too.
     
  5. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    Depends. 'Modern' chaintools are 9s/10s specific so are more narrow and a 1/8 inch chain may not fit into it. The current park Tool and Pedros tool will do both. BTW, pushing a pin partially out and then back in on shimano or sram 9s or 10s chains is a BAD IDEA and can and do result in a broken chain there. Use the supplied 'one use' pins or use a quick link that are cheap, not noisy and do not come disconnected.
     
  6. davereo

    davereo Well-Known Member

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    Depends. 'Modern' chaintools are 9s/10s specific so are more narrow and a 1/8 inch chain may not fit into it. The current park Tool and Pedros tool will do both. BTW, pushing a pin partially out and then back in on shimano or sram 9s or 10s chains is a BAD IDEA and can and do result in a broken chain there. Use the supplied 'one use' pins or use a quick link that are cheap, not noisy and do not come disconnected.



    Good advice. +1
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FWIW. I was simply noting what could be done with a contemporary chain breaker vs. a Park, Pedro, Campagnolo, or Shimano chain tool. A key to what I said is that the LIFU can push the pin back in back in "without distorting the plates" -- I do not know if the same is true with the other tools; and, if not, then it would be probably be impossible to successfully reset an existing chain pin/("rivet") ... I did not mean to suggest that resetting a pin was necessarily a GOOD IDEA ... No question about it, resetting a pin takes more time than using an OEM solution to join a chain. Both the novice and/or someone who has had trouble performing the simple task of adjusting a front derailleur should probably stick to the OEM solutions for joining a chain ... Whether-or-not any other person thinks that there is any benefit in being able to reset an existing pin in a chain is not for me to decide, but it was something I first decided to try shortly AFTER installing a then-new-for-me, 9-speed Shimano chain with the Shimano installation pin way-back-when (c2001, in my case) to see if it could be done the old fashioned way -- since I don't have a 10-speed Shimano or 11-speed Campagnolo chain, I don't know if resetting a chain rivet can be successfully accomplished, or not, but I don't see why not if one has the skill & dexterity ... I choose to reset the existing pin BECAUSE I CAN.
     
  8. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Once upon a time, long long ago (in a galaxy far far away.....NOT) actually up until the early 1990's if memory serves me right, there were no one use pins or quick links so the only way to reconnect the chain was to push the partially removed pin back in. Now that there are quick links, I tend to use them because I am lazy and they make it so much easier to remove the chain when the time comes to replace it, providing you can find the quick link (they all sorta look alike). I have used Shimano's special pins on the first 9-speed drive train that I ever had but it is a hassle trying to keep track of them and having to run to the store if you can't find the other four that came in the package of five that you bought last year. So now I have a small but sufficient supply of SRAM Power Connectors and KMC Missing Links. Note: the above post refers only to 3/32-inch chains. I have not used a 1/8-inch chain in over 40 years, but you shouldn't need a chain tool for the 1/8-inch chain. I believe that they have a master link for breaking them.
     
  9. cyberlegend1994

    cyberlegend1994 Moderator

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    I've had to step in and clean up a few posts. Please keep things civil.
     
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