Do one-legged drills...

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Gilders, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. Gilders

    Gilders New Member

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    Opinions please, people!
     
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  2. wardie2000

    wardie2000 New Member

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    speak to ric stern on this one
     
  3. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    i thoroughly recommend one legged drills... but only if you want to improve your one-legged cycling ability (or only have one leg).

    ric

    Edit: point 3 is the best answer, or at least the one that made me smile the most!
     
  4. ed073

    ed073 New Member

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    lol.....:)
     
  5. fondriest

    fondriest New Member

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    I was thinking about this the other day. I may start doing some one legged drills as i feel i may be favouring my right leg when riding normaly. This is due the fact i broke my left ankle last year and started riding to aid my rehabilitation. I actually started riding before i could walk (without the aid of crutches) but i am now thinking i may be subconciously favouring my right leg and putting in more effort with that leg.

    Think some left legged training could even things out a little :confused:
     
  6. palewin

    palewin New Member

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    I'm no expert, but my CTS coach puts them on the schedule occasionally, and I figure he knows what he's doing. Based on other replies, this looks like a subject where different coaches have different opinions (weight lifting for cyclists is another one where equally respected coaches come up with opposite answers!).
     
  7. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    I'm reading Fred Matheny's training book now, and he also recommends them. I just tried one-legged pedaling on the trainer, and I can hold a decent cadence for no more than 10-15 seconds. Should be easy to improve with just a few minutes a week, although I have no idea if it will actually translate to smoother pedaling on the road.

    If nothing else, drills like these break the boredom on winter trainer sessions!
     
  8. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    it's an old wives tale...

    we know from data, using instrumeneted force pedals (and iEMG) that better cyclists (elite) push down more and pull up less (i.e., less "smooth") compared to other cyclists who aren't elite (e.g., good state level) -- they push down less and pull up more - producing a "smoother" stroke. In the less good cyclists the forces produced pulling up, produced small forward propulsive movements.

    it may be a way to get through boredom on the trainer, that's likely to be it's only worthwhile benefit.

    ric
     
  9. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    When trying to hold cadence up a hill without downshifting, I often use my hamstrings to pull back through the 6 o'clock position. Seems to add some power, allowing me to stay seated, and also takes some pressure off the tired quads.

    Are you implying that elite cyclists don't really use their hamstrings to produce power in this way, or just that one-legged pedaling doesn't train this strength?
     
  10. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    I don't think he's implying anything. I think it's exactly what he said - elite pro cyclists apply less force through the upstroke than good quality amateurs (in a steady state at a reasonably high power).
     
  11. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    basically, as roadie_scum said i wasn't implying anything than presenting data on how two groups of cyclists pedal. however, what i perhaps should have added and alluded to in my earlier post is that one legged pedalling isn't optimal trainng (note, it's better than *no* training, but isn't as good as two legged training*). Additionally, trying to pull up isn't warranted, you're diverting your concentration away from optimal training, which is to increase your power output. In other words don't worry about how you do or don't pedal it's a waste of time -- just train to produce more power.

    ric
     
  12. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    As you have stated many times, the pressure that is required on the
    pedals when cycling at speed is less than you might expect it to be. Like
    using Powercranks, one legged pedalling trains a rider to unweight that rising
    pedal, this adds almost free pressure to the working pedal and this can have
    a significant effect on overall pedal power output.
     
  13. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    And your evidence is...?
     
  14. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    Actually a double advantage, the gravity effect and Newton's law which
    states " for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction".
     
  15. bikeguy2

    bikeguy2 New Member

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    Ric, name of study and date please that says elite pull up less than amateur cyclists? _
     
  16. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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  17. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    And how exactly would that random meandering fall within the definition of evidence?
     
  18. Fixey

    Fixey New Member

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    Possible alternatives: try weights (not to improve your cycling but to restore balance) or a trackbike, tend to be less forgiving of a weak leg imo hence balance will restore itself.
     
  19. n crowley

    n crowley New Member

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    Using a bike on a trainer with chain removed from chainwheel and feet
    resting and balancing on the pedals set in the 9---3 o'c position, if you
    suddenly lift your 9 o'c foot clear of pedal, you can clearly see that without
    using any pulling up effort on rising pedal or conscious downward pressure
    on falling pedal, a downward pressure is applied to the 3 o'c crank as
    pedal moves towards the 5 o'c position. With correct unweighting of
    idling pedal, this "free" power can be availed of from the 1 to 5 o'clock
    position. Over an hour's pedalling, this occurs 10,000 times.
     
  20. Roadie_scum

    Roadie_scum New Member

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    You are clearly a complete idiot.
     
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