Do worn out wrists need suspension forks?

Discussion in 'Touring and recreational cycling' started by Chris Rust, Jul 30, 2003.

  1. Chris Rust

    Chris Rust New Member

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    Hello, My 50-something wrists complain after an hour's cycling, partly due to an accident a few years ago when I went over the bars and landed hands first and partly due to general ageing.

    I'd appreciate any comments on whether suspension forks would be a good trade-off, I'm also concerned about keeping down the rolling resistance (having just invested in some decent tyres and a track pump I'm amazed at the reduction in effort but at the cost of increased vibration).

    Any other ideas about protecting wrists would be good. I have foam grips and padded palms in my gloves and I'm thinking about butterfly bars as they have some inherent spring.

    Best wishes from Sheffield, UK
    Chris Rust
     
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  2. MidBunchLurker

    MidBunchLurker New Member

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    I guess it depends on whether the pain is caused by general road buzz, or by the shock of bigger bumps:-

    - if it's general road buzz then a lightweight carbon handlebar usually has a bit more flex, and therefore is a bit more comfy. Also the longer the bar the more flex it should have, so something like Answer's Protaper Carbon might work well.
    - if it's the shock of bigger bumps then shocks might help, but you'd have to set them to a very sensitive setting to react to general road bumps, which would rob you of a LOT of generally efficiency.

    You might want to look at your position on the bike too. A more upright position should take some pressure off your wrists. You could do this by getting a higher rise stem.
     
  3. springdale

    springdale New Member

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    Hello Chris, I'm in the same age bracket and had the same problem this spring. It is my opinion that we are at the leading edge of a huge wave of baby-boomers that will experience the same problems. The solution for me was a homebuilt recumbent. It was an instant success. There are a host of body-parts that instantly find relief. It's just a thought, as long as you don't go off-road.
    While the experience was wonderful and rewarding I must admit that if I had put the same number of hours into a part-time job or other profitable enterprise I could've purchased a real nice production model. Just my $.02 USDollars
    Recline & glide & only stress the parts intended..
    Bob, in the center of the USA.
     
  4. prestonjb

    prestonjb New Member

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    If you stay with traditional geometry consider replacing the fork with carbon before or with replacing the handle bars.

    I also opted to go with Spinnergy Xareo and now Topolino carbon spoked wheels as they also reduce the transfer of vibrations...

    JBP
     
  5. Chris Rust

    Chris Rust New Member

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    Thanks for the comments and advice folks, I've just been for 7 days touring in West of Scotland and my wrists were not too bad (ached on the last day), the main innovation at the last minute was to add a pair of extra-long, curved bar-end extensions which gave me a choice of three hand positions and I think that was a great help. I'll look into more flexible bars as suggested.

    I suspect my problem is a combination of weight bearing plus vibration, although hitting potholes at speed can't help. Maybe having full luggage, including panniers on the front wheel, had a damping effect and the tarmac in the outer hebrides is generally excellent (Govt subsidies + light traffic).

    I have thought about a recumbant and may get one one day, however only one day of my trip involved a long stretch with fast traffic (Isle of Skye) but that was enough to frighten me off - you have to be able to position yourself in the path of the approaching camper van and be very clearly seen, even in the rain, if you want them to slow down. A recumbant doesn't give you the same presence.

    best wishes from Sheffield
    Chris
     
  6. SteveC

    SteveC New Member

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    It does, actually, especially if it is a trike. It may seem otherwise, but if you ride one for a while, you can observe driver behaviour.

    There is nothing physically stopping them from seeing you - after all, they don't have trouble spotting a 2mm-thick white line in the middle or edge of the road. It's something else in addition that triggers their awareness. That 'something else' lies in a trike's unusual form factor/silhouette, lights, clothing colour, flag, etc

    If you still have problems plaguing you I recommend you try one, for example from ICE

    SteveC
    PS You're in Sheffield! Nice. I was there in July. My disabled daughter is there and is just looking into trying a electric assist bike - the Giant LaFree Twist. That too is supposed to be comfortable, and best of its kind
     
  7. Jaguar27

    Jaguar27 New Member

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    Chris,
    Bear with me, I only started riding again very recently but do regular 30 mile rides along a Beach Trail ( From Balboa to Seal Beach in Southern California) and I tell you what, you really find all the tender points on a ride like that, no biggy for the experienced and "hardened" amongst us but I'm working on it ;-)
    I made the mistake of buying an inexpensive Bike because I thought I'd only ride once or twice a month but I love it, I haven't riden since I was a Kid in England where I grew up...

    The first, well, second "problem" were my Hands, my Palms would ache and my Fingers would eventually turn numb, I found padded Cycling Gloves made a huge difference, and I see you mentioned you already have those, they help don't they?
    Also, changing positions of the Hands regularly also helps as you said, I have straight handle bars still so this is difficult...
    My Bike does have front shocks and also has a pretty upright riding position, maybe the shocks don't help much because I have cheap ones obviously on my Diamondback Wildwood (yeah baby), a nice Bike for $199 (on sale) but I guess one learns by one's mistakes....I just ordered a 2004 Giant Yukon and will be talking to the Bike Shop Owner ( a very experienced ex-pro Cyclist) and will see what we, actually, he, can come up with as far as a more comfortable Handle Bar etc is concerned....
    This is my first post/visit to this Board, so as I get fitter & more knowledgeable I hope to beable to add a little feedback as I make some (expensive and painfull) mistakes along the way...

    Cheers then,
    Peter
    PS. Push 'em down, they're sure to come up again....;-)
     
  8. jtfleming

    jtfleming New Member

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    [​IMG]

    My touring bike came stock with this vibration isolator in the front forks. I am really quite amazed at the effectiveness of the thing.

    Specialized Zertz Fork
     
  9. geoffp

    geoffp New Member

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    I am curious - what was your bike brand & model that came with this fork? If it is not a commonly known type, do you have a web link to it?

    Cheers
    Geoff


    :)
     
  10. jtfleming

    jtfleming New Member

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    Just click on the tag...specialized zertz fork...at the bottom of your last post, and it will take you there :)
     
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