Do you listen to music while you ride?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by HatTrickhero11, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. wolfpack21643

    wolfpack21643 New Member

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    Just like if your standing down wind of a conversation you can hear it from a much longer distance then if your on the up wind side.

    I actually recall reading written comments made by people who lived around the area in which the battle of Gettysburg took place in July of 1863 while I was in college. On July 3rd the day of Picketts charge which had one of the largest cannon battles of the war many people who lived downwind as far away as 100 miles away claimed to hear the sound of the cannons. There was even a news paper acrticle published on July 4th which stated that some of the local residents had fled the area fearing that the war was about to roll into their town. The article apperaed in a paper that was published in a town that was 75 miles downwind of Gettysburg. They heard the cannon so loud that they thought they where beign fired just a mile away or so! But in other written accounts subjects only a few miles upwind of the town of Gettysburg stated they heard no cannon fire at all.

    Why do you think hunters and trackers try their best to stay downwind of their pray. Why do they do this? So the pray can not smell or hear them. Im no physics teacher but i know that wind does push sound waves around. There is also a study out there that I read while in the police acadmey that stated your patrol car siren can not be heard by vehicles that are as little as 60 feet in front of you once you hit 75 mph. And by the way drivers reeact when Im running lights and siren some where I belive it. Most of the time they dont know Im back there until I am right on there rear bumper, you know why that is? huh? becaues all my siren noise is beign pushed behind my car by the wind my patrol car is making. Once I slow down to their speed the wind dies down and the sound can again push foward so they can hear it and pull over.
     


  2. HatTrickhero11

    HatTrickhero11 New Member

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    That is a pretty interesting story. Do you know where you read that? I want to read that.


    How does someone even go about putting a seat belt on a bike? I personally wouldn't do it because if you get hit, I dont want to be attached to the bike the during that event
     
  3. wolfpack21643

    wolfpack21643 New Member

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    It was an article I read in a magaizne called "The Civil War Times". The times is written mostley by Phd types and highly rated historians in the Civil War field. The article was in the Times to explain about the effects of acoustical bounce and such. The writer actually cited several diffrent battles where the same thing occured. I belive he had a Phd in acoustics. I remeber the article was a big hit and he wrote several more talking about diffrent battles and how sounds played a big part in who heard what and how it effected the Generals descisions based on what they were hearing. I would guess the articles came out in the mid to late 90's if that helps any.
     
  4. Dan Wright

    Dan Wright New Member

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    I wholeheartedly agree... Restrictions lead to regulations... We'd all end up required to license and insure our bikes (maybe insurance isn't actually a bad thing considering the price of some road bikes I've been looking at! But I don't want to be told to get insurance). Hopefully the government keeps seeing us as engaging in a recreational activity and leaves us alone.
     
  5. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Really? Where's the proof? You have no idea whether sound is being "pushed" or whether it's only being overwhelmed by the addition of sound from the wind.. You're going to have to do a lot better than "what hunters know."
     
  6. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Where's the proof?

    Common sense. Something you lack. I take it you've never hunted in your life?

    http://svconline.com/mag/avinstall_weather/

    Wind gradients

    Some meteorological phenomena that affect sound propagation are wind gradients. Unlike temperature gradients that affect sound propagation equally all around the source, wind gradients have different effects upwind and downwind. Under normal atmospheric conditions, the wind velocity increases with height above the ground. The effect on sound transmission can be seen in Figure 10. Here, the different effects upwind and downwind of the source are seen with a shadow zone being formed upwind and a sound concentration downwind. Wind effects usually have a greater influence on sound propagation than temperature, but ironically, it is the temperature gradient that fundamentally causes the wind in the first place. For example, wind gradients can cause increases of up to 5 dB over the anticipated normal propagation, but they can cause excess attenuation losses of up to 20 dB. Temperature gradients, however, may typically cause gains or losses of the order of 5 dB. In practical terms, there is little that an installer or operator can do to combat these effects, apart from minimizing the distance the sound has to travel between the loudspeakers and audience. On the other hand, a basic knowledge of the underlying concepts can at least help to understand what is happening when the sound suddenly disappears as the show is about to start.


    Simply put; wind affects sound/hearing. Period.
     
  7. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Sound travels at slower speeds in cooler air (the air density makes no difference), so the speed of sound decreases as you increase altitude up to the cooler air. As with light travelling at different speeds through air and glass, you will then get refraction effects. This means that on a still day outside, sound is refracted upwards so that there is a "refraction shadow" effect leading to a lower sound volume for observers at a distance from the source.

    When there is a wind blowing there is also a wind shear leading to the layers of air higher up to travel faster than the lower layers. For an observer downwind of the source, this shear causes the refraction shadow to be deflected towards the ground. Thereby increasing the volume for the downwind observer.

    http://www.newscientist.com/blog/lastword/2008/07/surround-sound.html

    Mr Hickling is correct, although a simpler explanation is that the effect of wind and temerature gradients essentially diffract or bend sound waves downwards in the case of a downwind receiver and bend upwards in the case of an upwind receiver. (hence quieter upwind and louder downwind).

    This is also the reason distant noise sources appear louder after a cold stable night, where there is a strong ground based temperature inversion.



    Wind DOES carry sound, with negligible Doppler effect. If ALL the air molecules (medium) are moving, no acceleration (raised pitch)is perceived in most cases.
     
  8. Ray1966

    Ray1966 Member

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    I listen to music sometimes when I ride but I don't use headphones. I found this cool little handlebar mount MP3 player and speakers on eBay. It weighs about the same as the larger Cell phones. It's quick disconnect lets you take it off and put on another bike fast. It holds like 8 hours of music, plugs into your computer to transfer music to. The sound quality is pretty good, clear and easy to use while riding.

    If you have ever been by, or seen a motorcycle rider going down the road listing to a radio, it sounds allot like that. Just do a search on eBay for bicycle radio/MP3 player. It was around 65 dollars I think about 3 months ago. I don't listen to it much in town, but when I get out on the back roads it's great.
     
  9. Cristar

    Cristar New Member

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    Definitely I will listen to music when I'm riding, that makes me feel more comfortable. And I think it's legal but you should be careful when listen to music, look around to avoid accident.
     
  10. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Typical handlebar setup...rock on!

    [​IMG]
     
  11. wolfpack21643

    wolfpack21643 New Member

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    Thanks Campybob i really didn't have the gumption to look all that sound stuff up I just know from common sense that sound moves with the wind. Ridding my bike is more important to me then arguing on the internet with someone over sound so now i get to ride more today and spend less time defending myself. lol
     
  12. coolcamaro12

    coolcamaro12 New Member

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    well said :O
     
  13. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I got a hellova workout in this afternoon. Faster than my abused legs had any right to do.

    You did remind me though...I'm going to WVa. for deer season this year and it's about time get a couple rifles out of the safe and zero the optics.
     
  14. RideOfHisLife

    RideOfHisLife New Member

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    I only listen to my heartbeat, the tyres on the road and my breathing. That way i can judge the rate of my pedals better without music
     
  15. greenleaf

    greenleaf New Member

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    Ok, I don't know if you can get a used one but a while ago they made such a product. I have two of them. It was called the IHome, it came with a remote and you could plug your Ipod in to it. What was nice about it the speaker and iPod sat in the water bottle holder and the remote was removable. Laws or no laws or how people feel it's my ride. The man asked a question, let the dude ride.
     
  16. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    I have found that "rave" music has a positive effect on me not getting tired when on the bike... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  17. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    er...that's the XTC. bro!
     
  18. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

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    Nope, I didnt fell in love with the bar tape or anything... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

    I suggest the soundtrack from the "Wipeout" game series. An epileptic speed thing with flying race things. The music is fast too... /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif

    [​IMG]
     
  19. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    Electric bar tape + electric paint job + rave tunes = seizure city!
     
  20. markboyer1980

    markboyer1980 New Member

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    I listen to music all the time during my commute. Not so much during group rides though.
    I did see something interesting recently though that I thought I'd share... Anyone hear about this yet?

    [​IMG]
     
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