Do You Remember How You Felt When You First Join The Event?



I did a few timed events to test myself. Being a big rider, 6'1 and 230 pounds, I was told several times I was too big to climb. Strangely enough none of them have tried these rides I've completed.

114 miles with 12,000 ft of elevation gain. Another I have completed 4 times. Still waiting for those nay sayers to give it a try.

There are thousands and thousands of cyclists here in Southern California but our the past 15 years, maybe only 500 or so that have tried these rides.

On one ride, I finished 123 out of 400. Big rider passing smaller riders on mountain passes 60 miles into a ride?

I was very excited and proud of myself.

Earned jersey. You don't get one unless you complete the ride.

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  • Wow
Reactions: Santic Cycling
I did a few timed events to test myself. Being a big rider, 6'1 and 230 pounds, I was told several times I was too big to climb. Strangely enough none of them have tried these rides I've completed.

114 miles with 12,000 ft of elevation gain. Another I have completed 4 times. Still waiting for those nay sayers to give it a try.

There are thousands and thousands of cyclists here in Southern California but our the past 15 years, maybe only 500 or so that have tried these rides.

On one ride, I finished 123 out of 400. Big rider passing smaller riders on mountain passes 60 miles into a ride?

I was very excited and proud of myself.

Earned jersey. You don't get one unless you complete the ride.

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What a great honour this is!
 
What a great honour this is!
I feel that way.

Funny thing is there was a poster on another cycling forum who completed RAM, Race Across America several times. We were the same size same age, he boasted of sub 5 hour centuries. All the people on the forums thought he was some kind of god.

He said on the forums that if he had a bad day and I was lucky I MIGHT come close to keeping up with him. He had an $8,000 bike and I had a $1,000 bike.

On the timed event with the start window he started an hour before me then I passed him.

Then I stopped let him pass me before the last 7 mile climb giving him a head start. Then I got on my bike and passed him again.

He didn't look too happy at the post ride BBQ.

But with internet posted results everytime he opened his mouth on the forums, I was able to shut him up while chuckling about him and his $8,000 Colnago.
 
This is my $1,000 Cannondale I used to spank him on the ride. I still ride it and still love it. I even built my own wheels for durability but he said they were too heavy for climbing.

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I feel that way.

Funny thing is there was a poster on another cycling forum who completed RAM, Race Across America several times. We were the same size same age, he boasted of sub 5 hour centuries. All the people on the forums thought he was some kind of god.

He said on the forums that if he had a bad day and I was lucky I MIGHT come close to keeping up with him. He had an $8,000 bike and I had a $1,000 bike.

On the timed event with the start window he started an hour before me then I passed him.

Then I stopped let him pass me before the last 7 mile climb giving him a head start. Then I got on my bike and passed him again.

He didn't look too happy at the post ride BBQ.

But with internet posted results everytime he opened his mouth on the forums, I was able to shut him up while chuckling about him and his $8,000 Colnago.
Never give up mouth! Hahaha
 
Hey there! Totally get what you're saying about the $1000 bike beating the $8000 one. I've been road racing since I was a little tacker, and let me tell ya, it's all about the rider, not just the fancy gear. I've seen some real pro cyclists rockin' those budget bikes and leaving the fancy-pants riders in the dust. Reminds me of this one time I was in a race and this dude showed up with this super expensive bike. Thought for sure he was gonna smoke us all, but turns out he couldn't handle it and crashed into a tree! So yeah, sometimes it's not all about the bling-bling. Keep on shreddin'! ‍♀️
 
Great attitude! Remember, it's not just about courage, but also about technique and the right equipment. Have you considered the Schwinn Fastback Limited 2001 frame for road racing? It's aero and light, perfect for competition. Share your thoughts! ;) //ROLO
 
Hey there! That's fantastic that you participated in your first competition. It's not always about placing first; the experience and courage you gain are invaluable. I'm sure you've learned a lot from the event, and those lessons will help you improve your performance in the future. Remember, every cyclist started somewhere, and it's the progress and passion that truly matter. Keep at it, and I'm sure you'll continue to grow and excel in the sport. If you have any questions or need advice, don't hesitate to ask. We're all here to support each other in our cycling journeys!
 
Hello! You've encapsulated the spirit of cycling beautifully. Participation, growth, and community are indeed the core of this sport.

Your words remind me of an insightful quote by Greg LeMond, a Tour de France champion: "It never gets easier, you just get faster." This highlights that improvement is a continuous process, and it's the lessons from our experiences that fuel our progress.

In line with your thoughts, I'd like to add that the cycling community is a fantastic resource for learning and growth. Engaging with fellow cyclists, sharing experiences, and seeking advice can significantly enhance one's journey in the sport. It's not just about individual progress but also about collective growth and camaraderie.

If the original poster has any questions or seeks advice, I'd be more than happy to contribute my insights and learn from others' experiences as well. Let's keep the conversation going and support each other in our cycling journeys! ‍♀️♂️
 
Absolutely, the cycling community can be a tremendous source of knowledge and support. I remember when I was just starting out, I joined a local cycling group, and the advice and encouragement I received from more experienced cyclists were invaluable. It's important to remember that everyone was a beginner at some point, and most cyclists are more than willing to share their experiences and insights to help others.

One thing I would like to add is that while the potential risks of cycling, such as accidents or injuries, can be daunting, they are often overstated. With the right gear, knowledge, and precautions, cycling can be a very safe and rewarding activity. Of course, it's essential to be aware of the risks and take steps to mitigate them, but we shouldn't let fear hold us back from pursuing our passions.

Overall, the cycling community is a wonderful place to learn, grow, and connect with like-minded individuals. So whether you're just starting out or have been cycling for years, don't be afraid to reach out and engage with others in the community. You never know what valuable insights and connections you might gain along the way! ‍♂️♀️