Do You Replace Tires If There Is A Small Hole In It



jwroubaix

Member
Jun 6, 2007
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I noticed a small chunk out of my rear tire. Do you guys replace the tire if you seem something like that? I've rode the last few days without a problem.
 
Nigel Doyle said:
No. I replace when I can see the canvas or there's a large split.
I agree. Also replace if damage causes the casing to deform when inflated to riding pressure.
 
If I see the inner tube I replace it. The gash can get worse and cause blowouts. I only use a boot as a temporary stopgap to get me home.
 
If you can send me a picture of the hole, I'll gladly assess it's danger. However, I only fill in a hole if it is deep and effecting the Inner Tube. Also, be sure to watch out if any larger holes are appearing on the tires. Usually I wait till I feel the effects. For example, deflation, bumpiness, etc.
 
If it's just a chunk out of the tread surface I don't bother. If it's through, I'll put a patch on from the inside to prevent grit from working its way in and wear a hole in the tube.
If it's big enough to gape and deform the tire I'll boot it to get home, then either ditch the tire or do a more thorough repair. Some Liqui-Sole and a piece of cloth has worked fine for me.
 
Pretty much, the main issue is not the performance in itself because it's just a small chunk, the main question is precisely the fact that it's more prone to flats because it might affect the inner tube. Either cases, you can try to correct it yourself instead of buying a new tire.
 
Most the time I just get a fix and flat and make sure that I repair my tire in that matter but if the hole is a little too extreme that I try to make sure that I replaced the tire completely because I don't want my car to go flat while I'm on a journey.
 
That is the decision we need to make, if it's something we can repair and continue to ride with safety or if it needs to be replaced. Nothing like having the basic knowledge on repairs though and proper tools, they can save us a lot of time and money.
 
What's the measurement of the chunk, is my question? This might be a better safe than sorry situation. Though it may not be necessary to replace it perhaps you should anyway?
 
A dollar bill will not work as good as a Park Tire Boot. Without seeing the damage it's difficult to sit here and make a recommendation, so in light of that I would try to boot the tire, after you boot it inflate it and see if it bulges in that area, if not then use some Gorilla Super Glue and fill in the crack from the outside while the tire is inflated, this make take several applications and drying in between each application to get the glue to fill in properly. Once that's done test ride the tire if you feel a bump as you ride you'll have to discard the tire or use it for emergencies only, if you don't feel a bump then after every ride you may have to refill the crack with glue again this will help prevent debris from finding an easy path through the tire and through the boot patch. Also if the bump is gone and the tire is an expensive tire you can also get a Panaracer FlatAway tire liner and install it to stop anything that tries to make it's way through the patch. And just to be safe I would use this tire only on the rear in case of a blow out.
 
I think you should replace it man. Your safety is more important than saving a few bucks. Replacing old/worn out parts or tires with new and high quality ones is a good investment. They are pretty cheap nowadays too. You shouldn't risk your safety with a damaged tire.
 
I would leave it for 1-2 days to see if there is any significant changes on your bike's performance. If you notice the tire became deflated, the bike rode funny, or anything like that, then I would change the tire as the inner tube is probably punctured as well. I would not recommend those patches as they are not long lasting and can get you in trouble should it come undone when you are on a long bike ride. I know that changing the tire yourself can be time consuming (or costly if you decide to go to a repairman or if you need to buy the tools beforehand) but I think in the long run, changing the entire tire is a better option.
 
lordrenly said:
I would not recommend those patches as they are not long lasting and can get you in trouble should it come undone when you are on a long bike ride.

Funny thing about that, I've had a small cut in the sidewall of a GP4000S(hit) II tire after 2000km of use and used one of these Park Tool tire boots.

I had another 2000km with it since and even washed it the other day after picking up some glass on the road.

The patch is still in place and the tire works just fine...

I might just got lucky though... But they worked pretty well for me.

The cut is about 7mm long and it's placed on the sidewall of the tire about 1-2mm away from the kevlar bead.
 
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Reactions: Gelsemium
Pretty much Volnix, no need to send something away just because it has some problem, as you just proved it could be long lasting fixed and we save money.
 
Gelsemium said:
Pretty much Volnix, no need to send something away just because it has some problem, as you just proved it could be long lasting fixed and we save money.

What if it "explodes" on a dodgy turn on a dodgy descent? :D Bet that wont be too much of "value". :D
Anyway, changing them for a pair of Vittoria trainers... A whole different kind of "sham". :D (60 TPI, 145 PSI!!!!!!!!!! :D )
 
lol, anything can happen really when we are on top of the bike, but I always try to save my money unless the risk is really obvious. :)
 
You have to mend that hole. You may never know when it will have a complete burst. It then depends with the condition of the whole tire, is it new. If it is old, then I see no reason of you continuing to use it. But if that is the first hole then consider mending it because mending is cheaper than buying a new one.
 

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