Doctors Concerned About Teens on Atkins

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tcomeau, Feb 18, 2004.

  1. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    Doctors Concerned About Teens on Atkins

    source: http://www.kctv5.com/Global/story.asp?S=1651929 quote----------------
    Dr. Sarah Hampl is a pediatrician who specializes in treating overweight kids.

    "I wouldn't say it's ever safe," she says.

    She says Atkins may seem like a quick fix, but longer term, it's a nutritional time bomb.

    "At this point we don't have enough data to make us feel comfortable that its a safe diet even on a
    short term basis for teenagers," Hampl says.

    Hampl points to the tragic death of a Missouri 16-year-old. Rachel Huskey died while on the Atkins
    diet. An autopsy revealed low levels of electrolytes, one cause of the heart arrhythmia that killed
    her, and there are other risks tied to Atkins dieting.

    "They also can develop vitamin and mineral deficiencies that need to be supplemented. They can get
    very dehydrated. It can cause kidney stones. There's a lot of hidden risks that you don't really
    hear about," she says. ------------------ end quote

    Who is Dr Sarah Hampl?

    She is on the nutrition committee of the The American Academy of Pediatrics.

    source: http://www.aapkansas.org/KS%20-%20Ped%2005-03.pdf quote -------------- Nutrition Committee
    Lynn Casey, MD would like to welcome the following members that have volunteered to participate the
    Nutrition committee. • Jose Cocjin, MD • Sarah Hampl, MD, FAAP • Greta McFarland,
    MD, FAAP Lore Nelson, MD, is still looking for additional committee members. Pleased contact her or
    the KAAP office. Contact: Lore Nelson, MD, FAAP Phone: (913) 649-3335 Email: [email protected] KAAP
    Office: 913-894-5649 --------------------------end quote

    Who is the American Academy of Pediatrics and who sponsors their work?

    source: http://www.aap.org/donate/fcfhonorroll.htm
    -------------------
    Corporate Honor Roll

    PRESIDENTS CIRCLE $25,000 and Above Aventis Pharmaceuticals GlaxoSmithKline MedImmune Merck Vaccine
    Division McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals Pediatrics Insurance Consultants, Inc. Pfizer
    Consumer Healthcare

    BENEFACTOR $15,000 to $24,999 Abbott Laboratories AstraZeneca LP Aventis Pasteur Eli Lilly and
    Company Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc. Johnson & Johnson McDonald's Corporation National Dairy Council
    Procter & Gamble Baby Care Santen Incorporated

    PATRON $10,000 to $14,999 Gerber Products Company

    SUPPORTER $5,000 to $7,499 American Chemistry Council Ascent Pediatrics Avent America, Inc. Mead
    Johnson Nutritionals The Physician's Computer Company

    CONTRIBUTOR $3,000 to $4,999 INO Therapeutics, Inc. Kellogg’s Nestlé USA, Inc. PEDIATRIX
    Medical Group, Inc. Slim-Fast Foods Company Welch Allyn, Inc.

    Corporate Membership The American Academy of Pediatrics invites you to become a corporate member of
    the Friends of Children Fund, which supports AAP research and education programs for physicians,
    children, and families. Since its inception in 1989, the Fund has enabled the Academy to respond to
    emerging issues in children’s health through sponsorship of programs including quality
    improvement efforts, international pediatric initiatives and medical student outreach.

    BUILD A RELATIONSHIP: BECOME A CORPORATE MEMBER

    Involvement in the Friends of Children Fund offers you the opportunity to build a relationship with
    the Academy. Corporate members have access to leaders in pediatrics and can play a role in
    developing and refining programs that support the Academy’s mission to ensure the health and
    well-being of children.

    BENEFIT FROM INVOLVEMENT

    Member activities enable you to network with Academy representatives and other corporate leaders.
    Donors are able to build partnerships with others who share their goals and interests in order to
    advance child health. With an annual contribution, your company becomes a Corporate Member of the
    Friends of Children Fund. Membership benefits include:

    Invitations to donor receptions and corporate member programs hosted by AAP leadership Subscription
    to AAP News, the monthly Academy newspaper Acknowledgement through the Honor Roll of Giving printed
    in AAP News, the Friends of Children Fund Annual Report, and on donor boards displayed at national
    meetings. The Friends of Children Fund Corporate Membership is coordinated by the Office of
    Development. Staff are available to assist you in fostering productive relationships between the
    Academy and its corporate partners. Development staff provide you with guidance to identify trends
    in the profession of pediatrics as well as activities to address child health issues that will be of
    interest of your corporation.

    For more information, contact:

    Division of Corporate & Foundation Relations Office of Development American Academy of Pediatrics

    The Academy is classified as a 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to the Fund are charitable and
    tax deductible as allowed law.
    --------------

    The headline said "Doctor*s* Concerned About Teens on Atkins". Note the plural form of doctors. The
    story quotes *one* doctor. And a pretty sorry one at that.

    Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb consumers.
    Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American Academy of
    Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor girl who died while
    supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the only things a "doctor" can
    use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on. Shame on her.

    TC
     
    Tags:


  2. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    tcomeau <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:

    > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American Academy
    > of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor girl who died
    > while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the only things a
    > "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on. Shame on her.

    "Falsified" and "malicious"?

    A news article from the time:

    ``Atkins Diet Linked to Teen's Death in Missouri''

    - http://outreach.missouri.edu/hesfn/flash/health/nh021105.htm

    Also falsified and malicious?
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
     
  3. I see no conflict of interest here as far as Dr. Sarah Hampl is concerned.

    i

    In article <[email protected]>, tcomeau wrote:
    > Doctors Concerned About Teens on Atkins
    >
    > source: http://www.kctv5.com/Global/story.asp?S=1651929 quote----------------
    > Dr. Sarah Hampl is a pediatrician who specializes in treating overweight kids.
    >
    > "I wouldn't say it's ever safe," she says.
    >
    > She says Atkins may seem like a quick fix, but longer term, it's a nutritional time bomb.
    >
    > "At this point we don't have enough data to make us feel comfortable that its a safe diet even on
    > a short term basis for teenagers," Hampl says.
    >
    > Hampl points to the tragic death of a Missouri 16-year-old. Rachel Huskey died while on the Atkins
    > diet. An autopsy revealed low levels of electrolytes, one cause of the heart arrhythmia that
    > killed her, and there are other risks tied to Atkins dieting.
    >
    > "They also can develop vitamin and mineral deficiencies that need to be supplemented. They can get
    > very dehydrated. It can cause kidney stones. There's a lot of hidden risks that you don't really
    > hear about," she says.
    >
    > Who is Dr Sarah Hampl?
    >
    > She is on the nutrition committee of the The American Academy of Pediatrics.
    >
    > source: http://www.aapkansas.org/KS%20-%20Ped%2005-03.pdf quote -------------- Nutrition Committee
    > Lynn Casey, MD would like to welcome the following members that have volunteered to participate
    > the Nutrition committee. • Jose Cocjin, MD • Sarah Hampl, MD, FAAP • Greta
    > McFarland, MD, FAAP Lore Nelson, MD, is still looking for additional committee members. Pleased
    > contact her or the KAAP office. Contact: Lore Nelson, MD, FAAP Phone: (913) 649-3335 Email:
    > [email protected] KAAP Office: 913-894-5649
    >
    > Who is the American Academy of Pediatrics and who sponsors their work?
    >
    > source: http://www.aap.org/donate/fcfhonorroll.htm Corporate Honor Roll
    >
    > PRESIDENTS CIRCLE $25,000 and Above Aventis Pharmaceuticals GlaxoSmithKline MedImmune Merck
    > Vaccine Division McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals Pediatrics Insurance Consultants,
    > Inc. Pfizer Consumer Healthcare
    >
    > BENEFACTOR $15,000 to $24,999 Abbott Laboratories AstraZeneca LP Aventis Pasteur Eli Lilly and
    > Company Fujisawa Healthcare, Inc. Johnson & Johnson McDonald's Corporation National Dairy Council
    > Procter & Gamble Baby Care Santen Incorporated
    >
    > PATRON $10,000 to $14,999 Gerber Products Company
    >
    > SUPPORTER $5,000 to $7,499 American Chemistry Council Ascent Pediatrics Avent America, Inc. Mead
    > Johnson Nutritionals The Physician's Computer Company
    >
    > CONTRIBUTOR $3,000 to $4,999 INO Therapeutics, Inc. Kellogg’s Nestlé USA, Inc. PEDIATRIX
    > Medical Group, Inc. Slim-Fast Foods Company Welch Allyn, Inc.
    >
    > Corporate Membership The American Academy of Pediatrics invites you to become a corporate member
    > of the Friends of Children Fund, which supports AAP research and education programs for
    > physicians, children, and families. Since its inception in 1989, the Fund has enabled the Academy
    > to respond to emerging issues in children’s health through sponsorship of programs including
    > quality improvement efforts, international pediatric initiatives and medical student outreach.
    >
    > BUILD A RELATIONSHIP: BECOME A CORPORATE MEMBER
    >
    > Involvement in the Friends of Children Fund offers you the opportunity to build a relationship
    > with the Academy. Corporate members have access to leaders in pediatrics and can play a role in
    > developing and refining programs that support the Academy’s mission to ensure the health and
    > well-being of children.
    >
    > BENEFIT FROM INVOLVEMENT
    >
    > Member activities enable you to network with Academy representatives and other corporate leaders.
    > Donors are able to build partnerships with others who share their goals and interests in order to
    > advance child health. With an annual contribution, your company becomes a Corporate Member of the
    > Friends of Children Fund. Membership benefits include:
    >
    > Invitations to donor receptions and corporate member programs hosted by AAP leadership
    > Subscription to AAP News, the monthly Academy newspaper Acknowledgement through the Honor Roll of
    > Giving printed in AAP News, the Friends of Children Fund Annual Report, and on donor boards
    > displayed at national meetings. The Friends of Children Fund Corporate Membership is coordinated
    > by the Office of Development. Staff are available to assist you in fostering productive
    > relationships between the Academy and its corporate partners. Development staff provide you with
    > guidance to identify trends in the profession of pediatrics as well as activities to address child
    > health issues that will be of interest of your corporation.
    >
    > For more information, contact:
    >
    > Division of Corporate & Foundation Relations Office of Development American Academy of Pediatrics
    >
    > The Academy is classified as a 501(c)(3) organization. Contributions to the Fund are charitable
    > and tax deductible as allowed law.
    >
    > The headline said "Doctor*s* Concerned About Teens on Atkins". Note the plural form of doctors.
    > The story quotes *one* doctor. And a pretty sorry one at that.
    >
    > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American Academy
    > of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor girl who died
    > while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the only things a
    > "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on. Shame on her.
    >
    > TC
     
  4. "tcomeau" <[email protected]> wrote
    > The headline said "Doctor*s* Concerned About Teens on Atkins". Note the plural form of doctors.
    > The story quotes *one* doctor. And a pretty sorry one at that.
    >
    > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American Academy
    > of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor girl who died
    > while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the only things a
    > "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on. Shame on her.
    >
    > TC

    Missouri is on the map. Unfortunately, this time because of a teen's death associated with the
    Atkins Diet.

    An October 31st Reuters News story describes the case of an apparently healthy 16-year-old girl
    who collapsed suddenly and died after spending one to two weeks on the high-protein, low-
    carbohydrate diet.

    Dr. Paul Robinson, an assistant professor of child health at the University of Missouri, Columbia
    who specializes in adolescent health, reported that electrolyte imbalances due to the diet, and
    the resulting heart damage, were likely responsible for the teen's death.
     
  5. Mark D.

    Mark D. Guest

    "Tim Tyler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected].
    >
    > A news article from the time:
    >
    > ``Atkins Diet Linked to Teen's Death in Missouri''
    >
    > - http://outreach.missouri.edu/hesfn/flash/health/nh021105.htm
    >
    > Also falsified and malicious?

    This isn't my argument, of course; but having just read this article I would have to say, yes:
    it's got hysterical falsification in it *and* malicious, manipulative misinformation too. What's
    more, Tim, I don't think you'd accept such a thin and slanted article if it were written on
    another topic...

    November 5, 2002 Atkins Diet Linked to Teen's Death in Missouri Melinda Hemmelgarn, M.S., R.D.

    Missouri is on the map. Unfortunately, this time because of a teen's death associated with the
    Atkins Diet.

    An October 31st Reuters News story describes the case of an apparently healthy 16-year-old girl
    who collapsed suddenly and died after spending one to two weeks on the high-protein, low-
    carbohydrate diet.

    Dr. Paul Robinson, an assistant professor of child health at the University of Missouri, Columbia
    who specializes in adolescent health, reported that electrolyte imbalances due to the diet, and
    the resulting heart damage, were likely responsible for the teen's death.

    The teen had no known illnesses or prior medical conditions. Yet, when she arrived at the University
    of Missouri's Health Sciences Center in Columbia, she presented with low potassium and calcium
    levels, which are likely consequences of the high protein, low-carbohydrate diet. Low serum
    electrolytes disrupt the normal electrical function of the heart.

    Proponents of the Atkins diet say that other weight-loss measures including eating disorders like
    bulimia or the use of diuretics were far more likely to have contributed to the low electrolyte
    levels found in the teen's blood.

    But Robinson explains that interviews with the teen's parents did not suggest that she had a history
    of bulimia or diuretic use.

    Robinson states that most kids with eating disorders, even if they're able to hide the bulimia, are
    constantly talking about being fat or needing to lose weight and exercise. From what he understood
    of the interview with the girl's family, none of those problems were evident.

    Colette Heimowitz, director of education and research at Atkins Health and Medical Information
    Services, told Reuters Health that the Atkins approach has been used by millions of Americans for
    30 years, and there have been no documented cases of serious reactions or fatalities. Heimowitz
    doesn't believe that the actual dietary practices that the teen followed for days or weeks could
    possibly account for what the physicians are attributing it to. Instead, Heimowitz believes that
    the irregular chemical levels detected during the autopsy could be associated with drugs
    emergency medical personnel and doctors administered to resuscitate the teen, or with other weight-
    loss efforts.

    Robinson disagrees. "I don't think there is any way the resuscitative drugs would have affected
    (the teen's electrolytic balance)," he said, noting that when the teen came in, she had low
    potassium levels.

    Very high-protein/low-carbohydrate diets result in a condition called ketosis. In ketosis, the body
    has used up its preferred fuel reserves--glycogen derived from carbohydrates--and instead burns fat.
    Wahida Karmally, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, told Reuters Health that
    these diets can cause muscle breakdown, weakness, nausea and dehydration. They limit the intake of
    entire categories of food that provide certain nutrients, such as potassium. These effects can
    happen right away," she said.

    "It is a worrying set of circumstances when kids die suddenly," Robinson said. Robinson urges
    clinicians to keep their eyes open. "If kids come in with sudden death and they're on this kind of
    diet, we really have to start paying more attention to it."

    SOURCE: Southern Medical Journal 2002;95:1047-1049; Reuters News Service, October, 2002, as cited in
    the American Dietetic Association's on-line daily news update.

    E.
     
  6. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    Tim Tyler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > tcomeau <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    >
    > > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American
    > > Academy of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor
    > > girl who died while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the
    > > only things a "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on.
    > > Shame on her.
    >
    > "Falsified" and "malicious"?
    >
    > A news article from the time:
    >
    > ``Atkins Diet Linked to Teen's Death in Missouri''
    >
    > - http://outreach.missouri.edu/hesfn/flash/health/nh021105.htm
    >
    > Also falsified and malicious?

    The teenager in question had been trying all types of weight loss methods for an unknown period of
    time before she tried low-carb. She died about two weeks after going low-carb. How does that prove
    that low-carb diets can cause this? It doesn't. All this proves is that some "doctors" are prepared
    to use such sad and tragic situations to imply false causation in malicious attacks against low-carb
    diets. Yopu could have checked into this yourself and seen the obvious biases in the reporting of
    this incident.

    TC
     
  7. Tcomeau

    Tcomeau Guest

    "George W. Cherry" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]_s04>...
    > "tcomeau" <[email protected]> wrote
    > > The headline said "Doctor*s* Concerned About Teens on Atkins". Note the plural form of doctors.
    > > The story quotes *one* doctor. And a pretty sorry one at that.
    > >
    > > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American
    > > Academy of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor
    > > girl who died while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the
    > > only things a "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on.
    > > Shame on her.
    > >
    > > TC
    >
    > Missouri is on the map. Unfortunately, this time because of a teen's death associated with the
    > Atkins Diet.
    >
    > An October 31st Reuters News story describes the case of an apparently healthy 16-year-old girl
    > who collapsed suddenly and died after spending one to two weeks on the high-protein, low-
    > carbohydrate diet.
    >
    > Dr. Paul Robinson, an assistant professor of child health at the University of Missouri, Columbia
    > who specializes in adolescent health, reported that electrolyte imbalances due to the diet,
    > and the resulting heart damage, were likely responsible for the teen's death.

    Old news and old nonsense.

    TC
     
  8. Tim Tyler

    Tim Tyler Guest

    tcomeau <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:
    > Tim Tyler <[email protected]> wrote in message news:
    > > tcomeau <[email protected]> wrote or quoted:

    > > > Yet another attack on atkins from a "doctor" that is "concerned" about the health of carb
    > > > consumers. Wonder how much she gets paid to be on the Nutrition committee of the American
    > > > Academy of Pediatrics? And she quotes the falsified and malicious nonsense about that poor
    > > > girl who died while supposedly on the atkins diet. If falsehoods and such nonsense are the
    > > > only things a "doctor" can use to argue against atkins diet, they don't have much to go on.
    > > > Shame on her.
    > >
    > > "Falsified" and "malicious"?
    > >
    > > A news article from the time:
    > >
    > > ``Atkins Diet Linked to Teen's Death in Missouri''
    > >
    > > - http://outreach.missouri.edu/hesfn/flash/health/nh021105.htm
    > >
    > > Also falsified and malicious?
    >
    > The teenager in question had been trying all types of weight loss methods for an unknown period of
    > time before she tried low-carb. She died about two weeks after going low-carb. How does that prove
    > that low-carb diets can cause this? It doesn't.

    Nor does that news article make any such claim. All it says is that there's a link.

    There was: the girl went onto the Atkins diet and then died.

    They even found a doctor (of some sort) prepared to claim that a causal link between the two was
    "likely responsible":

    ``Dr. Paul Robinson, an assistant professor of child health at the University of Missouri, Columbia
    who specializes in adolescent health, reported that electrolyte imbalances due to the diet, and the
    resulting heart damage, were likely responsible for the teen's death.''

    Of course this isn't exactly very conclusive - but then nobody claimed that it was.
    --
    __________
    |im |yler http://timtyler.org/ [email protected] Remove lock to reply.
     
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