Does Anybody Else Display a Message?



N

nash

Guest
"Tom Keats" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> In article <[email protected]>,
> oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]> writes:
>> I have seen very few cyclists displaying a cycling advocacy message on
>> their back, bag or seat. It seems to me, that this is one of the best
>> ways to encourage cycling.

>
> There's no such thing as encouraging cycling.
> But there ~is~ /not discouraging/ it.
>
> It's kind of like gardening -- we can't force the
> plants to grow and thrive, at least not beyond a
> certain point. But we can avoid stepping on them.
>
> If someone wants to ride, they will. If they don't,
> they won't.
>
>
> cheers,
> Tom
>
> --
> Nothing is safe from me.
> Above address is just a spam midden.
> I'm really at: tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca


Yeah, but Tom if you do not plant a garden in the first place ie healthy
attitude to life, and cultivate, then the weeds will choke it out of
existence. Nurture nature.
Like Red Skeleton saying at the end of his show saying something like "If I
made just one person's day brighter I have done my job. Thank-you"
 
L

Larry Farrell

Guest
amakyonin wrote:
[snip]
>
> His assertion of being "oil free" is questionable since he is
> obviously participating in our modern world and thereby making use of
> a substantial amount of petroleum derived products like plastics (the
> keyboard he types on) and essentially all manufactured products
> indirectly. Even the Amish aren't oil free. I suggest that he drop out
> of society and resort to backwoods survivalism if he really wants to
> be oil free.
>


How can even bicycling be "oil free?" After all, there are numerous
lubricants used to make the bicycle operate that are oil or oil-based.

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
 
D

Dane Buson

Guest
Larry Farrell <[email protected]> wrote:
> amakyonin wrote:
> [snip]
>>
>> His assertion of being "oil free" is questionable since he is
>> obviously participating in our modern world and thereby making use of
>> a substantial amount of petroleum derived products like plastics (the
>> keyboard he types on) and essentially all manufactured products
>> indirectly. Even the Amish aren't oil free. I suggest that he drop out
>> of society and resort to backwoods survivalism if he really wants to
>> be oil free.

>
> How can even bicycling be "oil free?" After all, there are numerous
> lubricants used to make the bicycle operate that are oil or oil-based.


Well, I suppose you could use some organic oil (soybean, olive,
soybean/beeswax, whatever) for your chain. I'm not quite sure what to
replace grease with. I have no desire to put goose grease (for
instance) into my headset.

--
Dane Buson - [email protected]
"France is the only country where the money falls apart and you
can't tear the toilet paper." -Billy Wilder
 
D

DI

Guest
"Dane Buson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Larry Farrell <[email protected]> wrote:
>> amakyonin wrote:
>> [snip]
>>>
>>> His assertion of being "oil free" is questionable since he is
>>> obviously participating in our modern world and thereby making use of
>>> a substantial amount of petroleum derived products like plastics (the
>>> keyboard he types on) and essentially all manufactured products
>>> indirectly. Even the Amish aren't oil free. I suggest that he drop out
>>> of society and resort to backwoods survivalism if he really wants to
>>> be oil free.

>>
>> How can even bicycling be "oil free?" After all, there are numerous
>> lubricants used to make the bicycle operate that are oil or oil-based.

>
> Well, I suppose you could use some organic oil (soybean, olive,
> soybean/beeswax, whatever) for your chain. I'm not quite sure what to
> replace grease with. I have no desire to put goose grease (for
> instance) into my headset.
>
> --
> Dane Buson - [email protected]
> "France is the only country where the money falls apart and you
> can't tear the toilet paper." -Billy Wilder


I hope he doesn't ride on asphalt paved roads.
 
C

catzz66

Guest
Larry Farrell wrote:
>
> How can even bicycling be "oil free?" After all, there are numerous
> lubricants used to make the bicycle operate that are oil or oil-based.
>


That's really my point. To say you are oil free sounds a little
sanctimonious since probably hardly anyone is completely oil free. If
you were to say you were "oil reduced and happy" would not sell quite as
many tshirts, but would probably be more truthful. If you lived in a
closed community in some remote part of the earth, only rode a camel or
a donkey for transportation and seldom if ever went to "town" and bought
something manufactured, you might come closer to being oil free than
anyone wearing an "I'm oil free" tshirt.
 
N

nash

Guest
"catzz66" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Larry Farrell wrote:
>>
>> How can even bicycling be "oil free?" After all, there are numerous
>> lubricants used to make the bicycle operate that are oil or oil-based.
>>

>
> That's really my point. To say you are oil free sounds a little
> sanctimonious since probably hardly anyone is completely oil free. If you
> were to say you were "oil reduced and happy" would not sell quite as many
> tshirts, but would probably be more truthful. If you lived in a closed
> community in some remote part of the earth, only rode a camel or a donkey
> for transportation and seldom if ever went to "town" and bought something
> manufactured, you might come closer to being oil free than anyone wearing
> an "I'm oil free" tshirt.


Well then think of it this way. How many times does a car need a quart of
oil. How many times does a bike need a quart of oil. Not even in my life
time folks.

Same for anyone thinking cars are as detrimental to the environment as bikes
because they both are made of natural resources. Get a grip on reality
hosers.
Yeah, you can say that if you buy the car and never never ever drive it.
Even though it still is not true but closer to the truth.
 
N

nash

Guest
When going across Canada on our bikes we had "Pedalling Our Asses Across
Canada" t-shirts made.
They were white.
Ones I have now are bright yellow with "Allowed Use of Full Lane" in a
diamond shape sign with a bike.

Do not think they can be read that easy by speeding motorists but at least
it makes me more visible.
 
On Apr 24, 12:51 pm, catzz66 <[email protected]> wrote:
> Nobody is oil free if they are consumers of any
> products at all, including bikes.


And despite what one of the shirts suggests, cyclists are not powered
by sweat, but by carbohydrates and lipids, producing C02, methane and
other "stuff" (albeit less than a single passenger car doing the same
distance).
 
L

landotter

Guest
On Apr 25, 12:18 am, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > I have seen very few cyclists displaying a cycling advocacy message on
> > their back, bag or seat. It seems to me, that this is one of the best
> > ways to encourage cycling.

>
> There's no such thing as encouraging cycling.


I don't know if I agree with that, but certainly the OP's concept of
empty mobile slogans are pointless.

> But there ~is~ /not discouraging/ it.
>
> It's kind of like gardening -- we can't force the
> plants to grow and thrive, at least not beyond a
> certain point. But we can avoid stepping on them.


Delightfully said. Bravo!

Just be a proper cyclist and those that are inclined to be influenced,
will be.
 
O

oilfreeandhappy

Guest
On Apr 24, 11:18 pm, [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > I have seen very few cyclists displaying a cycling advocacy message on
> > their back, bag or seat. It seems to me, that this is one of the best
> > ways to encourage cycling.

>
> There's no such thing as encouraging cycling.
> But there ~is~ /not discouraging/ it.
>
> It's kind of like gardening -- we can't force the
> plants to grow and thrive, at least not beyond a
> certain point. But we can avoid stepping on them.
>
> If someone wants to ride, they will. If they don't,
> they won't.
>
> cheers,
> Tom
>
> --
> Nothing is safe from me.
> Above address is just a spam midden.
> I'm really at: tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca


Interesting perspective. But doesn't this totally defeat any type of
pursuasion - debates, logical arguments, even advertising?

I remember years ago, as a much younger man, I went to a convention in
St. Louis. There was an older fellow there, with long grey hair, who
had tree-trunks for legs, who had ridden a bicycle all the way from
Minnesota. He was very vocal about cycling advocacy. I can tell you
that he influenced at least one person. I've been riding ever since
then.
----
Jim Gagnepain
http://www.OilFreeandHappy.com
 
O

oilfreeandhappy

Guest
On Apr 24, 5:25 pm, "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> And you just happen to sell that ****. Keep it to .marketplace...- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Aren't we hostile. I said nothing about my Advocacy items in the
original post of this thread. I merely inquired about the concept of
Making a Statement while riding.
 
B

Bill Sornson

Guest
oilfreeandhappy wrote:
> On Apr 24, 5:25 pm, "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>> And you just happen to sell that ****. Keep it to .marketplace...-
>> Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -

>
> Aren't we hostile. I said nothing about my Advocacy items in the
> original post of this thread. I merely inquired about the concept of
> Making a Statement while riding.


With a handy little link to your site that just /happens/ to feature items
for sale that "Make a Statement".

It's about as transparent as it gets, greasy.

BS (really)
 
On Apr 24, 11:52 pm, oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]>
wrote:
> > The problem with messages, is that the vast majority just ignore the
> > message by assuming the messenger is a wack-o.

>
> > Joseph

>
> Why do you say this? I've gotten complimented by a number of
> drivers. Also, I stopped worrying about what others think a long time
> ago. In terms of history, if certain individuals worried about being
> an outcast:
> 1. Women wouldn't be voting today.
> 2. Blacks wouldn't be playing baseball (or other sports).
> 3. We wouldn't have an ozone layer in our atmosphere.
> 4. There would still be a Berlin Wall.
> 5. Cars wouldn't have seat belts.
> 6. The AMA would still be practicing blood-letting.
> 7. Gas efficiency in cars would be worse than the Model T - Never mind
> this one, many cars get less MPG than the old Model T.
> etc, etc.


I don't think there is any reason on a personal level to worry about
what others think of you, but in order to have the biggest impression
in order to effect change with a message, you need to appear "normal"
otherwise you are dismissed as lunatic fringe. Most of the people who
respond positively to your message are already on board at least in
thought. It's preaching to the choir in a way. Most people don't want
to be part of or associated with a lunatic fringe, so I think the best
way to get normal people to ride bikes is to show them more normal
people riding bikes. Otherwise they think cycling in only for what
they perceived of as freaks. This goes for any protest type activity
as well. Which would get more milage with "the masses" at home: a news
clip of 100 grungy kids whining about something, or 100 soccer moms
holding a petition?

Joseph
 
T

Tom Keats

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
"[email protected]" <[email protected]> writes:

> Which would get more milage with "the masses" at home: a news
> clip of 100 grungy kids whining about something, or 100 soccer moms
> holding a petition?


The Boston Pizza commercial with Louie the sasquatch pointing
and gutterally exclaiming: "Meaaat balll!"


cheers,
Tom

--
Nothing is safe from me.
Above address is just a spam midden.
I'm really at: tkeats curlicue vcn dot bc dot ca
 
N

nash

Guest
If someone expresses an interest, I'll gladly do what I can to
hold the door open for them. But I won't push them through.
<<<<<<<<<<<<

How is wearing a t-shirt pushing them through. Are you afraid to just
agree?
It's not as if we can actually get hurt by words like you assume if some
would hate cycling even more.
The rest of the world doesnot think like that. They would just laugh.
It is called free speech. Tooting your own horn. Protecting your way of
life.
Heck I would wear a "Don't Smoke" T-shirt if I thought it would help but I
don't feel guilty if it turns some into smokers because they are spiteful.
Just planting the seed so to speak. Doing my part for the environment.
Assholes on the road just make me want to bike more and take more space.
Fighting fire with fire. Fortunately, I have not had to hit anyone's mirror
or bend their license in half for a couple years.
What bugs me more than drivers though is the **** on the road, like
potholes, gravel, dirt, nails, glass, wet leaves, rocks, etc., even more
than words.
 
M

Mark Mitchell

Guest
On 2007-04-24, Sir Ridesalot <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 24, 12:42 am, oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> I have seen very few cyclists displaying a cycling advocacy message on
>> their back, bag or seat. It seems to me, that this is one of the best
>> ways to encourage cycling. I look at it this way. I have to read some
>> very stupid bumper stickers, so why not display my own message. Plus,
>> my message is more readable than a bumper sticker, since I have a
>> larger surface area.
>> ----
>> Jim Gagnepainhttp://www.OilFreeandHappy.com

>
>
> Hi there.
>
> How about:
>
> This Vehicle Runs On Bananas And Water
>
> or
>
> This Vehicle Gets 50 Kms/Banana
>
> or
>
> Eating 2 Many Bananas = Jet Propulsion
>
> Cheers from Peter
>

20 miles to the beer.

How would you rather fill up?

Mark
 
M

Mark Mitchell

Guest
On 2007-04-26, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Apr 24, 11:52 pm, oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> > The problem with messages, is that the vast majority just ignore the
>> > message by assuming the messenger is a wack-o.

>>
>> > Joseph

>>
>> Why do you say this? I've gotten complimented by a number of
>> drivers. Also, I stopped worrying about what others think a long time
>> ago. In terms of history, if certain individuals worried about being
>> an outcast:
>> 1. Women wouldn't be voting today.
>> 2. Blacks wouldn't be playing baseball (or other sports).
>> 3. We wouldn't have an ozone layer in our atmosphere.
>> 4. There would still be a Berlin Wall.
>> 5. Cars wouldn't have seat belts.
>> 6. The AMA would still be practicing blood-letting.
>> 7. Gas efficiency in cars would be worse than the Model T - Never mind
>> this one, many cars get less MPG than the old Model T.
>> etc, etc.

>
> I don't think there is any reason on a personal level to worry about
> what others think of you, but in order to have the biggest impression
> in order to effect change with a message, you need to appear "normal"
> otherwise you are dismissed as lunatic fringe. Most of the people who
> respond positively to your message are already on board at least in
> thought. It's preaching to the choir in a way. Most people don't want
> to be part of or associated with a lunatic fringe, so I think the best
> way to get normal people to ride bikes is to show them more normal
> people riding bikes. Otherwise they think cycling in only for what
> they perceived of as freaks. This goes for any protest type activity
> as well. Which would get more milage with "the masses" at home: a news
> clip of 100 grungy kids whining about something, or 100 soccer moms
> holding a petition?
>
> Joseph
>

Don't discount the value of a lunatic fringe. The sense of normality
is based on a comparison with the lunatic fringe. The further out it
is, the wider the 'normal' range.

Mark
 
B

Bill H.

Guest
On Apr 24, 3:55 pm, oilfreeandhappy <[email protected]>
wrote:

> A "cycling advocacy" message simply takes it a step further. It makes
> it very clear to passers-by, that you are riding for a reason.
> Without it, there are those who may think, "That poor fellow, he can't
> afford a car" or "Poor guy must have gotten his driver's license
> suspended". A message, such as "One Less Car" or other, lays those
> notions to rest.


Two points:

1) I think it's more than a little self-righteous to wear flags,
stickers, and whatnot that say "One Less Car." or some similar "I'm-
better-because-I-bike" message. Express yourself if you want, but
what you're really doing is claiming some superiority over someone who
can't, or chooses not to ride a bike.

2) Secondly, do you honestly care about what some stranger thinks of
how much money you have? I don't. When I get on my bike, I'm riding
for me because I enjoy it, and it's great exercise. Someone thinks
I'm poor...I truly couldn't care less.

> Jim Gagnepainhttp://www.OilFreeandHappy.com


You're not oil free. Not even close to being oil-free. If you've
purchased anything in your life, you've supported the oil companies.
I don't care if you've never purchased gasoline in your life. The
food you eat, the clothes you wear, the computer you're using...all
this was brought to you by oil-powered vehicles.
 
D

Dane Buson

Guest
Mark Mitchell <[email protected]> wrote:
>>

> Don't discount the value of a lunatic fringe. The sense of normality
> is based on a comparison with the lunatic fringe. The further out it
> is, the wider the 'normal' range.


Very true. Let me dig out the quote by Tooker Gomberg.

"We need radical activism so that the moderates
aren't ignored as a fringe element." - Tooker Gomberg

--
Dane Busoa- [email protected]
"The key is to commit crimes so confusing that police feel too stupid to
even write a crime report about them."
-Aubrey, 'Something Positive'
 
O

oilfreeandhappy

Guest
On Apr 25, 11:34 pm, "Bill Sornson" <[email protected]> wrote:
> With a handy little link to your site that just /happens/ to feature items
> for sale that "Make a Statement".
>
> It's about as transparent as it gets, greasy.
>
> BS (really)


Part of the signature, clearly separated from the message. Many
people do this.
----
Jim Gagnepain
http://www.OilFreeandHappy.com