Does anyone have a picture or rear B&M Dynamo mounted on Dynamohalter fixture or anything else?



D

ddog

Guest
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/dynamohalter.jpg

Above link is Peter Whites site B&M rear generator mount fixture, but
looks similar to fixture holders I've seen elsewhere. I especially
want to see how installed on rear of bike (RS B&M Generator for Left
Rear postition). I would like to get one of these 6v 3W German jewels,
but have to mount in back because I have old Weinmann centerpull
brakes, and can't use conventional bracket for sidepull or cantileaver
caliper mounts.

Although I've seen fixture on a couple of sites, I've yet been able to
see one mounted on a bike. Or any rear fixtures for B&M generators
mounting on rear that would work with centerpull brakes would work
fine as well.


Thanks!!
 
?

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=FCnther?= Schwarz

Guest
ddog wrote:

<http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/dynamohalter.jpg>

> Above link is Peter Whites site B&M rear generator mount fixture, but
> looks similar to fixture holders I've seen elsewhere. I especially
> want to see how installed on rear of bike (RS B&M Generator for Left
> Rear postition).


While I do not have experience with this specific item I want to note
that most of these brackets are shaped for oval fork blades. They will
in general not fit nicely to round seat stays. As an alternative
plastic brackets from Cateye might be used for this purpose:
<http://www.xn--gnther-schwarz-gsb.de/Pictures/ice10.jpg>

Günther
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 20, 4:23 pm, Günther Schwarz <[email protected]> wrote:
> ddog wrote:
>
> <http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/dynamohalter.jpg>
>
> > Above link is Peter Whites site B&M rear generator mount fixture, but
> > looks similar to fixture holders I've seen elsewhere. I especially
> > want to see how installed on rear of bike (RS B&M Generator for Left
> > Rear postition).

>
> While I do not have experience with this specific item I want to note
> that most of these brackets are shaped for oval fork blades. They will
> in general not fit nicely to round seat stays. As an alternative
> plastic brackets from Cateye might be used for this purpose:
> <http://www.xn--gnther-schwarz-gsb.de/Pictures/ice10.jpg>
>
> Günther


Günther,

Thanks! That looks like a very nice setup. I was wondering about the
generator being on the oily chain side, and then noticed plastic pipe
around the chain beside the wheel. Very nice. I think more
investigation is required on my part. Evidently this is more common in
Europe where bikes are mainstay transportation. I really like the
concept, but the horizontal tire/hub pressure is also a concern. Maybe
lurching around UK sites will offer the information I need since they
are the only Europeon sites I can understand.

Thank you for the detailed rear generator mount photo on an ultimate
bike (recumbent-?). I understand the wheel pressure adjustment is very
sensitive, and the rear wheel really seems like the ultimate position
due to straight tracking and less travel than front wheels. Maybe
someone in US will do one as well some day. I'll relook at it again
later. Google in US has a block on some products world wide, and I
think this is one of them. It makes progress slower no doubt.

This photo will be worth gold in helping me though. I appreciate the
information.


Regards,
Phil Bailey
 
On Feb 20, 4:23 pm, Günther Schwarz <[email protected]> wrote:
> ddog wrote:
>
> <http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/images/products/Lights/dynamohalter.jpg>
>
> > Above link is Peter Whites site B&M rear generator mount fixture, but
> > looks similar to fixture holders I've seen elsewhere. I especially
> > want to see how installed on rear of bike (RS B&M Generator for Left
> > Rear postition).

>
> While I do not have experience with this specific item I want to note
> that most of these brackets are shaped for oval fork blades. They will
> in general not fit nicely to round seat stays. As an alternative
> plastic brackets from Cateye might be used for this purpose:
> <http://www.xn--gnther-schwarz-gsb.de/Pictures/ice10.jpg>
>
> Günther


Regarding that setup: IIRC, the Lightspin generator shown pivots into
contact with the tire by tipping inward, not swinging as a door
swings. That is, the axis of rotation for engaging the generator is
perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the generator's drive wheel.

Many other generators swing in like a door swings, the pivot axis
being parallel to the main rotation axis. Those types are better NOT
mounted as in Gunther's example, with the pivot ahead of the
generator.

The reason is, both freedom from slipping and generator drag are
greatly influenced by contact pressure of the drive wheel. If a "door
swing" generator were mounted as shown, the generator's resistance
would make it dig harder into the tire, causing more drag and more
tire wear. This is why many generators come in "left" or "right"
models. It's easier to adjust the strength of tire contact to just
prevent slipping, without causing additional drag.

With the Lightspin shown (or any other one that pivots as it does)
it's not a problem.

- Frank Krygowski
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 20, 11:38 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> Regarding that setup: IIRC, the Lightspin generator shown pivots into
> contact with the tire by tipping inward, not swinging as a door
> swings. That is, the axis of rotation for engaging the generator is
> perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the generator's drive wheel.
>
> Many other generators swing in like a door swings, the pivot axis
> being parallel to the main rotation axis. Those types are better NOT
> mounted as in Gunther's example, with the pivot ahead of the
> generator.
>
> The reason is, both freedom from slipping and generator drag are
> greatly influenced by contact pressure of the drive wheel. If a "door
> swing" generator were mounted as shown, the generator's resistance
> would make it dig harder into the tire, causing more drag and more
> tire wear. This is why many generators come in "left" or "right"
> models. It's easier to adjust the strength of tire contact to just
> prevent slipping, without causing additional drag.
>
> With the Lightspin shown (or any other one that pivots as it does)
> it's not a problem.
>
> - Frank Krygowski- Hide quoted text -


Frank,

Thanks for the information. Those seem more efficient and unobtainable
in US, ha-ha. Yellow Jersey had some and is sold out now. They would
cost more than double from UK with currency rate, shipping, and
insurance. They look like the most efficient available. I need to
spend some time and investigate those for sure. Anything else seems to
be a compromise at this point. The worse thing about the dynamo from
my persective was the hub pressure, from sampling a 'normal' French
dynamo, which 'felt' like 18 pounds force. Maybe it would be ok on 26"
tires, but not on mine. Otherwise, the French Dynamo was very well
crafted.

Battery vendors may be keeping them out of US since they are so
efficient, or some other money motivation elsewhere. Those would
definitely be worth screwing with babblefish and ordering direct.


Thanks Again,
Phil Bailey
 
D

ddog

Guest
I stand corrected, Yellow Jersey has them for $210 complete set
whatever that includes from the link below.
Their sold out link is the 2nd link when put Lightspin in Google, so
don't know which is right or wrong.
But its the only thing I've seen and sounds reasonable if that really
does include everything and will affix to rear wheel.

http://www.yellowjersey.org/standlite.html
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
ddog wrote:
> I stand corrected, Yellow Jersey has them for $210 complete set
> whatever that includes from the link below.
> Their sold out link is the 2nd link when put Lightspin in Google, so
> don't know which is right or wrong.
> But its the only thing I've seen and sounds reasonable if that really
> does include everything and will affix to rear wheel.
>
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/standlite.html



Whilst the LightSpin is an excellent product, it has limitations.
Read the manuals carefully to determine which types of lamp work with it.
There is some fancy electronics to regulate the output, and that limits what
can be run from it.

My cursory reading suggested that conventional bulbs are fine, but LED lamps
and LED standlights are not suited.



- Nigel

--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
?

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=FCnther?= Schwarz

Guest
Phil Bailey (ddog) wrote:

> On Feb 20, 4:23 pm, Günther Schwarz <[email protected]> wrote:
>> ddog wrote:


>> <http://www.xn--gnther-schwarz-gsb.de/Pictures/ice10.jpg>


> Thank you for the detailed rear generator mount photo on an ultimate
> bike (recumbent-?). I understand the wheel pressure adjustment is very
> sensitive, and the rear wheel really seems like the ultimate position
> due to straight tracking and less travel than front wheels.


IMO if possible the front fork will offer the better position. A shorter
wire to the light and no trouble with the dynamo coming into the way of
panniers or heels. As I mentioned already most brackets are made for
fork legs, not for tiny seat stays.
On this specific bike - a recumbent trike - front mounting is not
possible. Also a trailing position as suggested by Frank in his posting
is out of question because the rear triangle between seatstays and
chainstays is extremely small. Even a standard bottle dynamo which is
much less bulky than the Lightspin won't fit.

Günther
 
?

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=FCnther?= Schwarz

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> On Feb 20, 4:23 pm, Günther Schwarz <[email protected]> wrote:


>> <http://www.xn--gnther-schwarz-gsb.de/Pictures/ice10.jpg>


> Regarding that setup: IIRC, the Lightspin generator shown pivots into
> contact with the tire by tipping inward, not swinging as a door
> swings. That is, the axis of rotation for engaging the generator is
> perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the generator's drive wheel.


Yes, it works exactly like that.

> Many other generators swing in like a door swings, the pivot axis
> being parallel to the main rotation axis. Those types are better NOT
> mounted as in Gunther's example, with the pivot ahead of the
> generator.
>
> The reason is, both freedom from slipping and generator drag are
> greatly influenced by contact pressure of the drive wheel. If a "door
> swing" generator were mounted as shown, the generator's resistance
> would make it dig harder into the tire, causing more drag and more
> tire wear.


Such a trailing arrangement in front of a fork leg or seatstay may
actually also offer a small advantage in case a bolt comes loose.

> This is why many generators come in "left" or "right" models.


I don't know of any that is not offered in two chiral versions: Left for
mounting in front of the left fork leg and right for the right one.
Also the Lightspin and the Nordlicht as the two most prominent examples
of the vertically tilting variant come in both versions. The one
pictured in my posting is a left model.

> With the Lightspin shown (or any other one that pivots as it does)
> it's not a problem.


Actually I would prefer to mount it differently as it interferes with
panniers. But the rear triangle is too small to allow for a trailing
position and if mounted below the left chainstay it would be exposed to
a lot of grid and moisture.

Günther
 
?

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=FCnther?= Schwarz

Guest
Nigel Cliffe wrote:

> Whilst the LightSpin is an excellent product, it has limitations.
> Read the manuals carefully to determine which types of lamp work with
> it. There is some fancy electronics to regulate the output, and that
> limits what can be run from it.


AFAIK it is just a voltage regulation. Unlike virtually all other bike
dynamos it is not a 'Klauenpolgenerator' (my tech dictionary does not
know the proper English word for this) and needs regulation just like
the alternator in a motor vehicle.

> My cursory reading suggested that conventional bulbs are fine, but LED
> lamps and LED standlights are not suited.


IME it works with a Inoled. I can see no reason why it should not work
with a DLumotec. It might even power two of them wired in parallel. It
won't work with the series arrangement of two bike lights.
The manual suggests to cut off a voltage limiting diode in the light as
this interferes with the built in voltage regulation. It also notes
that the electronics in the Schmidt E6 works just fine together with
the Lightspin. I did not test this, though.
I see the limitations of this dynamo more in the fact that it is quite a
bit more bulky than other bottle dynamos. On the bike I posted a
picture from it hinders me from mounting a pannier. On a more
conventional bike where the typical mounting position in the rear will
be in between seatstays and stainstays it is likely to interfere with
the cyclists' foot. Therefore the better position will be in the front
in general.
Finally it uses two bolts for mounting instead of one like most other
models. While this makes adjustment easier it won't fit well on most
brackets including the ones soldered to the frame or fork. So it will
be best to use it's specific bracket in most cases.

Günther
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
Günther Schwarz wrote:
> Nigel Cliffe wrote:
>
>> Whilst the LightSpin is an excellent product, it has limitations.
>> Read the manuals carefully to determine which types of lamp work with
>> it. There is some fancy electronics to regulate the output, and that
>> limits what can be run from it.

>
> AFAIK it is just a voltage regulation. Unlike virtually all other bike
> dynamos it is not a 'Klauenpolgenerator' (my tech dictionary does not
> know the proper English word for this) and needs regulation just like
> the alternator in a motor vehicle.
>
>> My cursory reading suggested that conventional bulbs are fine, but
>> LED lamps and LED standlights are not suited.

>
> IME it works with a Inoled. I can see no reason why it should not work
> with a DLumotec. It might even power two of them wired in parallel. It
> won't work with the series arrangement of two bike lights.
> The manual suggests to cut off a voltage limiting diode in the light
> as this interferes with the built in voltage regulation. It also notes
> that the electronics in the Schmidt E6 works just fine together with
> the Lightspin. I did not test this, though.
> I see the limitations of this dynamo more in the fact that it is
> quite a bit more bulky than other bottle dynamos. On the bike I
> posted a picture from it hinders me from mounting a pannier. On a more
> conventional bike where the typical mounting position in the rear will
> be in between seatstays and stainstays it is likely to interfere with
> the cyclists' foot. Therefore the better position will be in the front
> in general.
> Finally it uses two bolts for mounting instead of one like most other
> models. While this makes adjustment easier it won't fit well on most
> brackets including the ones soldered to the frame or fork. So it will
> be best to use it's specific bracket in most cases.



If experience shows it works, then good.

When researching dynamos last year, I decided that a front hub dynamo was
the better solution for my requirements on a touring cycle, so that is the
solution I took.


My old "OK to lock at railway stations" bike uses a B&M bottle dynamo,
which is fine for 6km journeys in the dark.



- Nigel

--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 21, 3:41 pm, "Nigel Cliffe" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Günther Schwarz wrote:
> > Nigel Cliffe wrote:

>
> >> Whilst the LightSpin is an excellent product, it has limitations.
> >> Read the manuals carefully to determine which types of lamp work with
> >> it. There is some fancy electronics to regulate the output, and that
> >> limits what can be run from it.

>
> > AFAIK it is just a voltage regulation. Unlike virtually all other bike
> > dynamos it is not a 'Klauenpolgenerator' (my tech dictionary does not
> > know the proper English word for this) and needs regulation just like
> > the alternator in a motor vehicle.

>
> >> My cursory reading suggested that conventional bulbs are fine, but
> >> LED lamps and LED standlights are not suited.

>
> > IME it works with a Inoled. I can see no reason why it should not work
> > with a DLumotec. It might even power two of them wired in parallel. It
> > won't work with the series arrangement of two bike lights.
> > The manual suggests to cut off a voltage limiting diode in the light
> > as this interferes with the built in voltage regulation. It also notes
> > that the electronics in the Schmidt E6 works just fine together with
> > the Lightspin. I did not test this, though.
> > I see the limitations of this dynamo more in the fact that it is
> > quite a bit more bulky than other bottle dynamos. On the bike I
> > posted a picture from it hinders me from mounting a pannier. On a more
> > conventional bike where the typical mounting position in the rear will
> > be in between seatstays and stainstays it is likely to interfere with
> > the cyclists' foot. Therefore the better position will be in the front
> > in general.
> > Finally it uses two bolts for mounting instead of one like most other
> > models. While this makes adjustment easier it won't fit well on most
> > brackets including the ones soldered to the frame or fork. So it will
> > be best to use it's specific bracket in most cases.

>
> If experience shows it works, then good.
>
> When researching dynamos last year, I decided that a front hub dynamo was
> the better solution for my requirements on a touring cycle, so that is the
> solution I took.
>
> My old "OK to lock at railway stations" bike uses a B&M bottle dynamo,
> which is fine for 6km journeys in the dark.
>
> - Nigel
>
> --
> Nigel Cliffe,
> Webmaster athttp://www.2mm.org.uk/- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Great information guys!

On my 1971 Raleigh Supercourse, I may have more room in my 27" tire
rear frame than your bikes 700 tire frames. Theoretically, I still
like the rear but you are the experts so here is a fuzzy focused
picture of my front end, another fuzzy angled view, a picture of the
front rack I'll be installing sometime in the near future, and I'll
have black planetX plastic fenders as well.

http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070217-frontEnd.jpg

http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070221-Angleview.jpg

http://www.lickbike.com/lickimages/3578.gif

If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations. The
problem with installing a B&M generator is I don't have a caliper or
sidepull front fork caliper mount and the rear AL cnc piece is for
oval fork legs and mine are more round. Would there be anyway to
install the Lightspin (or Nordic if it is equivalent) on this bike
config? I would like to be able to mount (light) bags (to distribute
weight) on each side of all 4 wheels which may not be possible. I'd
just like to see how I could do it at all first. I found a Veloplus
site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
16% for the generator alone. Then I'd have to figure out models and
brackets. I don't really need capacitor deluxe models since I'll have
digital battery lights that are on it always for stopping transitions,
and hear Lightspin are up at 6km/h which others are almost 15km/h.

http://www.veloplus.ch/shop/artikel_detail.asp?grp=5133

And I was thinking about the $15 Lumotec for headlight too.

http://www.tiny.cc/Loumotec


I appreciate your help,
Phil Bailey
 
?

=?ISO-8859-1?Q?G=FCnther?= Schwarz

Guest
Phil Bailey (ddog) wrote:

> On Feb 21, 3:41 pm, "Nigel Cliffe" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Günther Schwarz wrote:
>> > Nigel Cliffe wrote:


>> When researching dynamos last year, I decided that a front hub dynamo
>> was the better solution for my requirements on a touring cycle, so
>> that is the solution I took.


> On my 1971 Raleigh Supercourse, I may have more room in my 27" tire
> rear frame than your bikes 700 tire frames. Theoretically, I still
> like the rear but you are the experts so here is a fuzzy focused
> picture of my front end, another fuzzy angled view, a picture of the
> front rack I'll be installing sometime in the near future, and I'll
> have black planetX plastic fenders as well.
>
> http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070217-frontEnd.jpg
>
> http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070221-Angleview.jpg
>
> http://www.lickbike.com/lickimages/3578.gif
>
> If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
> the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
> validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations.


The front end will be fine, at least without the rack. For the rear end
you will have to try.

> I found a Veloplus
> site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
> 16% for the generator alone.


Veloplus has a good reputation. But they are Swiss, not German ;-)
Frankly, you could avoid shopping for bottle dynamos and mounting
hardware in Europe by fitting a dynohub wheel. Peter White sells one
from 115$ on and he will most certainly have 27" rims also. Even the
cheaper ones like the Shimano NX-30 are more reliable than any bottle
dynamo. Simply because they don't slip in bad weather.

Günther
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 21, 5:16 pm, Günther Schwarz <[email protected]> wrote:
> Even the
> cheaper ones like the Shimano NX-30 are more reliable than any bottle
> dynamo. Simply because they don't slip in bad weather.
>
> Günther- Hide quoted text -


Swiss? Whoops, saw those naked women on bikes in the Netherlands and
got confused.

Except the hub dynamos are on all the time, and I ride mostly in the
day.
Plus with my IRD freewheel, I was going to get Phil Wood hubs at a
third price of Phil Wood cassette hubs
when I do get wheels, later. I'm 240 lbs so need a stout wheel and hub
assembly like Sheldon recommends
so my current wheels will be as good as any Chinese made production
wheels now, and most likely better with new bearings/lube.

Nothing's easy, but I don't like restricted and heavy batteries nor
hub dynamos on all the time.
New battery technology is coming out soon and that may be the answer.
GW Bush may be holding the battery technology up until he's out of
office though, but it was supposed to be Spring 2007 for
1 minute to 5 minute recharge batteries, and then the Litespeed would
be the ultimate, even in rain.

But the Lightspeed looks like the best I've seen so far from reports,
if valid information.
Europe shipping rate is not too bad really, when you consider the junk
we get from China that breaks more times than not.
The UK tax man is the bad one that jacks anything up almost $200 on
top of double US currency rate for shipping/insurance.
I'm glad to see manufacturing still in Europe. There is absolutely
nothing manufactured in US except Wendy's hamburgers.

US is in a delimma. Most can only understand English, and although UK
has some very fine shops, they are not only cost prohibitive, but some
will not ship to US and Canada due to insurance rates - ??? Guess I
need to get the Babblefish translater out more. The only problem with
that is to know what language I'm translating from :)


Thanks Günther,
Phil Bailey
 
A

Andreas Oehler

Guest
21 Feb 2007 13:43:48 -0800, ddog:

>If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
>the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
>validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations. The
>problem with installing a B&M generator is I don't have a caliper or
>sidepull front fork caliper mount and the rear AL cnc piece is for
>oval fork legs and mine are more round. Would there be anyway to
>install the Lightspin (or Nordic if it is equivalent) on this bike
>config? I would like to be able to mount (light) bags (to distribute
>weight) on each side of all 4 wheels which may not be possible. I'd
>just like to see how I could do it at all first. I found a Veloplus
>site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
>16% for the generator alone. Then I'd have to figure out models and
>brackets.


The Lightspin dynamo is out of production for some time now. The company
went bankrupt:
http://www.moneyhouse.ch/u/lightspin_ag_in_liquidation_CH-170.3.028.221-7.htm

Andreas
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 21, 6:39 pm, Andreas Oehler <[email protected]> wrote:
> 21 Feb 2007 13:43:48 -0800, ddog:
>
> >If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
> >the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
> >validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations. The
> >problem with installing a B&M generator is I don't have a caliper or
> >sidepull front fork caliper mount and the rear AL cnc piece is for
> >oval fork legs and mine are more round. Would there be anyway to
> >install the Lightspin (or Nordic if it is equivalent) on this bike
> >config? I would like to be able to mount (light) bags (to distribute
> >weight) on each side of all 4 wheels which may not be possible. I'd
> >just like to see how I could do it at all first. I found a Veloplus
> >site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
> >16% for the generator alone. Then I'd have to figure out models and
> >brackets.

>
> The Lightspin dynamo is out of production for some time now. The company
> went bankrupt:http://www.moneyhouse.ch/u/lightspin_ag_in_liquidation_CH-170.3.028.2...
>
> Andreas


Hmmmm, guess I just need one. 30 year old discontinued parts are still
selling on Ebay in US.
Too bad though.

Thanks!
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
> On Feb 20, 11:38 pm, [email protected] wrote:
>> Regarding that setup: IIRC, the Lightspin generator shown pivots into
>> contact with the tire by tipping inward, not swinging as a door
>> swings. That is, the axis of rotation for engaging the generator is
>> perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the generator's drive wheel.
>>
>> Many other generators swing in like a door swings, the pivot axis
>> being parallel to the main rotation axis. Those types are better NOT
>> mounted as in Gunther's example, with the pivot ahead of the
>> generator.
>>
>> The reason is, both freedom from slipping and generator drag are
>> greatly influenced by contact pressure of the drive wheel. If a "door
>> swing" generator were mounted as shown, the generator's resistance
>> would make it dig harder into the tire, causing more drag and more
>> tire wear. This is why many generators come in "left" or "right"
>> models. It's easier to adjust the strength of tire contact to just
>> prevent slipping, without causing additional drag.
>>
>> With the Lightspin shown (or any other one that pivots as it does)
>> it's not a problem.


ddog wrote:
> Thanks for the information. Those seem more efficient and unobtainable
> in US, ha-ha. Yellow Jersey had some and is sold out now. They would
> cost more than double from UK with currency rate, shipping, and
> insurance. They look like the most efficient available. I need to
> spend some time and investigate those for sure. Anything else seems to
> be a compromise at this point. The worse thing about the dynamo from
> my persective was the hub pressure, from sampling a 'normal' French
> dynamo, which 'felt' like 18 pounds force. Maybe it would be ok on 26"
> tires, but not on mine. Otherwise, the French Dynamo was very well
> crafted.
>
> Battery vendors may be keeping them out of US since they are so
> efficient, or some other money motivation elsewhere. Those would
> definitely be worth screwing with babblefish and ordering direct.


The company folded (for the second time) in June 2006

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
Günther Schwarz wrote:
> Phil Bailey (ddog) wrote:
>
>> On Feb 21, 3:41 pm, "Nigel Cliffe" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> Günther Schwarz wrote:
>>>> Nigel Cliffe wrote:

>
>>> When researching dynamos last year, I decided that a front hub
>>> dynamo was the better solution for my requirements on a touring
>>> cycle, so that is the solution I took.

>
>> On my 1971 Raleigh Supercourse, I may have more room in my 27" tire
>> rear frame than your bikes 700 tire frames. Theoretically, I still
>> like the rear but you are the experts so here is a fuzzy focused
>> picture of my front end, another fuzzy angled view, a picture of the
>> front rack I'll be installing sometime in the near future, and I'll
>> have black planetX plastic fenders as well.
>>
>> http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070217-frontEnd.jpg
>>
>> http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070221-Angleview.jpg
>>
>> http://www.lickbike.com/lickimages/3578.gif
>>
>> If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
>> the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
>> validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations.

>
> The front end will be fine, at least without the rack. For the rear
> end you will have to try.



Almost any frame clamp for dynamos has a locking screw. The screw isn't
there for current earth, its to stop the clamp rotating round the tube. For
oval forks the screw mainly stops the bracket sliding down the fork. If
you value your frame, you don't run screws into the paint and the metal
below. If you don't care too much about the rust or damage, its fine.
So, my "station" bike has a clunky clamp around the front fork for a B&M
bottle dynamo.
I'd never do such a thing to a "good" bike.


With the rack you are proposing, it might be possible to put a couple of
bits of rectangular metal bar between rails, and then drill it to take the
dynamo. It might also need some stand-off parts to position the dynamo the
appropriate distance from the wheel.

However... (below...)




>> I found a Veloplus
>> site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
>> 16% for the generator alone.

>
> Veloplus has a good reputation. But they are Swiss, not German ;-)
> Frankly, you could avoid shopping for bottle dynamos and mounting
> hardware in Europe by fitting a dynohub wheel. Peter White sells one
> from 115$ on and he will most certainly have 27" rims also. Even the
> cheaper ones like the Shimano NX-30 are more reliable than any bottle
> dynamo. Simply because they don't slip in bad weather.



I would agree with this.


Peter White has the better 3N70 hub for $90. I'm using one on my (well
cared for) touring bike as the best compromise product. Significantly
cheaper than the Schmidt hub, and almost as good.

Having used it for a year, I can report the following:
Drag when off - unable to detect anything compared to a normal wheel when
riding the bike. Changing between makes of tyre (even the same section) has
a far greater effect.
Drag when on, powering 3W lamp - very slight increase in pedal effort, I can
feel it, but it is very very tiny. Perhaps 0.5kph at most ? There is a
slight buzz at higher speeds (above 40kph), and I've not found what is
causing that. Its about as fast as I'd want to ride when needing lights to
see !
If I need to take the wheel out, the electric plug slides off the hub, then
the normal quick release takes out the wheel. If I want to run the old
wheel, then it drops back in place.
I've not felt the need to put the old wheel (nothing wrong with it, has a
decent tyre on it) back in this bike, even in the summer when I know I will
not need lights; I think that says the hub isn't noticeable in real use.

Installation was easy; a few cable ties around the fork to keep the two
wires tidy, up to a lamp mounted on the fork crown bolt. Lamp has an on-off
switch which I can easily reach from the handlebars.



90 Euros for the Lightspin is, I guess, around $120 these days ? I'd go
with the hub dynamo.




- Nigel


--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
A

A Muzi

Guest
ddog wrote:
> I stand corrected, Yellow Jersey has them for $210 complete set
> whatever that includes from the link below.
> Their sold out link is the 2nd link when put Lightspin in Google, so
> don't know which is right or wrong.
> But its the only thing I've seen and sounds reasonable if that really
> does include everything and will affix to rear wheel.
>
> http://www.yellowjersey.org/standlite.html


Sorry, I missed one of the references when we purged those.
Hit F5 to refresh

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
D

ddog

Guest
On Feb 21, 6:44 pm, "Nigel Cliffe" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Günther Schwarz wrote:
> > Phil Bailey (ddog) wrote:

>
> >> On Feb 21, 3:41 pm, "Nigel Cliffe" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>> Günther Schwarz wrote:
> >>>> Nigel Cliffe wrote:

>
> >>> When researching dynamos last year, I decided that a front hub
> >>> dynamo was the better solution for my requirements on a touring
> >>> cycle, so that is the solution I took.

>
> >> On my 1971 Raleigh Supercourse, I may have more room in my 27" tire
> >> rear frame than your bikes 700 tire frames. Theoretically, I still
> >> like the rear but you are the experts so here is a fuzzy focused
> >> picture of my front end, another fuzzy angled view, a picture of the
> >> front rack I'll be installing sometime in the near future, and I'll
> >> have black planetX plastic fenders as well.

>
> >>http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070217-frontEnd.jpg

>
> >>http://www.dooberywhatsit.com//files/RSC-070221-Angleview.jpg

>
> >>http://www.lickbike.com/lickimages/3578.gif

>
> >> If I can figure out how to install Lightspin on my front forks, then
> >> the rear would not be too difficult to figure out, at least to
> >> validate if it would obstruct pedalling range or bag locations.

>
> > The front end will be fine, at least without the rack. For the rear
> > end you will have to try.

>
> Almost any frame clamp for dynamos has a locking screw. The screw isn't
> there for current earth, its to stop the clamp rotating round the tube. For
> oval forks the screw mainly stops the bracket sliding down the fork. If
> you value your frame, you don't run screws into the paint and the metal
> below. If you don't care too much about the rust or damage, its fine.
> So, my "station" bike has a clunky clamp around the front fork for a B&M
> bottle dynamo.
> I'd never do such a thing to a "good" bike.
>
> With the rack you are proposing, it might be possible to put a couple of
> bits of rectangular metal bar between rails, and then drill it to take the
> dynamo. It might also need some stand-off parts to position the dynamo the
> appropriate distance from the wheel.
>
> However... (below...)
>
> >> I found a Veloplus
> >> site in Germany I may figure out enough to order one at 90 euros plus
> >> 16% for the generator alone.

>
> > Veloplus has a good reputation. But they are Swiss, not German ;-)
> > Frankly, you could avoid shopping for bottle dynamos and mounting
> > hardware in Europe by fitting a dynohub wheel. Peter White sells one
> > from 115$ on and he will most certainly have 27" rims also. Even the
> > cheaper ones like the Shimano NX-30 are more reliable than any bottle
> > dynamo. Simply because they don't slip in bad weather.

>
> I would agree with this.
>
> Peter White has the better 3N70 hub for $90. I'm using one on my (well
> cared for) touring bike as the best compromise product. Significantly
> cheaper than the Schmidt hub, and almost as good.
>
> Having used it for a year, I can report the following:
> Drag when off - unable to detect anything compared to a normal wheel when
> riding the bike. Changing between makes of tyre (even the same section) has
> a far greater effect.
> Drag when on, powering 3W lamp - very slight increase in pedal effort, I can
> feel it, but it is very very tiny. Perhaps 0.5kph at most ? There is a
> slight buzz at higher speeds (above 40kph), and I've not found what is
> causing that. Its about as fast as I'd want to ride when needing lights to
> see !
> If I need to take the wheel out, the electric plug slides off the hub, then
> the normal quick release takes out the wheel. If I want to run the old
> wheel, then it drops back in place.
> I've not felt the need to put the old wheel (nothing wrong with it, has a
> decent tyre on it) back in this bike, even in the summer when I know I will
> not need lights; I think that says the hub isn't noticeable in real use.
>
> Installation was easy; a few cable ties around the fork to keep the two
> wires tidy, up to a lamp mounted on the fork crown bolt. Lamp has an on-off
> switch which I can easily reach from the handlebars.
>
> 90 Euros for the Lightspin is, I guess, around $120 these days ? I'd go
> with the hub dynamo.
>
> - Nigel
>
> --
> Nigel Cliffe,
> Webmaster athttp://www.2mm.org.uk/- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


But the wheels won't be CR18 rims and DT db spokes. I've heard Shimano
Mavic wheels have a designed max cap around 180 lbs rider. That may be
good for Japan and Europe, but I've got 60 more lbs. Every time I
investigate production wheels on web, I get disappointing results from
lightweight riders cracking up wheels and frames, whether its spam or
not. But I believe people here so will keep an open mind. I guess
locking bike up with a Lightspin may be a problem as well.

Just got an email back from Peter Whites wife, I think, and she says
Peter says LightSpins are unreliable. So I need to take my time and
broaden out my search. Its been very educational though. I thought the
French generator and bulb for $38.50 was too good to be true :-o

And actually it was 109 Euros x 116% ~ $139 to $164 if 1 Euro =
1.2 to 1.3 USD.

Best thing to do is not to ride at night!


Thanks Nigel,
Phil Bailey