Does anyone have a traning regime template which I could have?

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Gimala, Jul 24, 2013.

  1. Gimala

    Gimala New Member

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    Does anyone have a training regime template that I could have, something like a excel folder or a attachment? Thanks. :)
     
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  2. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Day 1: Ride your bike
    Day 2: Ride your bike
    Day 3: Ride your bike
    Day 4: Ride your bike
    Day 5: Ride your bike
    Day 6: Ride your bike
    Day 7: Ride your bike

    Make some days easier, make some longer, make some faster, take some off when life gets in the way or you're extra tired but try to ride at least 5 days per week

    Repeat for many months to many years

    Seriously, what's your starting point, what are your cycling goals, how do you measure what you've done and or what you're out on the bike doing (e.g. HR, RPE, Power, Speed, Distance, Hours in the saddle, etc.).

    There isn't really a one size fits all needs training plan but when in doubt ride as often as you can, extend both distance and speed as fitness improves and make some days easier and some days harder.

    -Dave
     
  3. bmoberg337

    bmoberg337 Member

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    [SIZE= 10pt]I'm assuming you are asking for a regimen that you can implement into your own training. As mentioned, there is no one size fits all training program and any regimen you follow has to be personalized. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE= 10pt] In the most general sense, to improve fitness you need to apply an increasing amount of stress on the body while allowing for adequate recover to make the adaptations you desire. Ideally you would establish some baseline for the amount of stress your body can accept in a given day, week, month, etc. and slightly increase that stress from week to week while also incorporating an adequate amount of recovery to let your body heal. A lot of literature on endurance training suggests that you should not increase your volume or intensity by more than 5-10% a week. This means maybe only adding an extra 1/2 hr of riding time per week, or an extra 5-10 miles to your longest ride of the week.[/SIZE]
    [SIZE= 10pt] [/SIZE]
    [SIZE= 10pt]If you’re new to the sport then you will likely see a lot of gains just from riding your bike and applying simple principles like the ones already mentioned. If you have been cycling for a few years and have noticed a plateau in your performance then you may need to implement more specific training strategies into you daily regimen. [/SIZE]

    [SIZE= 10pt]Ideally the best training plan is one in which you consistently increase your training stress while still allowing for adequate recovery. Simply put, you find the perfect balance between work and recovery. It takes time, and trial and error to figure this out. And as your fitness changes so will your training plans. Sounds simple right? [/SIZE]
     
  4. Gimala

    Gimala New Member

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  5. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    [ATTACHMENT=457]1fitness.xlsx (32k. xlsx file)[/ATTACHMENT] i have this template to keep track of your body weight, BMI, body fat, its in metric system though,
     
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  6. Bicycleman

    Bicycleman Well-Known Member

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