Does anyone know anything about these makes?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Purple, Jul 17, 2004.

  1. Purple

    Purple Guest

    Hiya

    Does anyone know anything about Viking Targa or Beowulf bikes? They always
    seem to sell very well on eBay. Has anyone ever tried them?

    TIA

    Fran
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 20:04:01 GMT, "Purple"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hiya
    >
    >Does anyone know anything about Viking Targa or Beowulf bikes? They always
    >seem to sell very well on eBay. Has anyone ever tried them?
    >
    >TIA
    >
    >Fran
    >


    I've got a Pagan Arrow which is basically the same sort of bike and
    was also supplied via Parkers of Bolton like many of those other
    brands you listed.

    You basically get a bike based around a frame made in taiwan with
    components made in either China or Taiwan.The brand is just something
    that sounds acceptable to the european market especially germany.

    Almost all the top bike brands have their frames made in Taiwan at
    least for their budget bottom end models. The taiwanese made frames
    seem to be made very well where as chinese made frames are more hit
    and miss.

    They are a small step up from the sterling house/universal type models
    that feature chinese made frames. The actual components are pretty
    much the same as most of the time its chinese made shimano stuff.

    Have a look at the feedback of some of the companies selling the bikes
    to see what customers think of them. Looking at the Parkers of Bolton
    site you will see most people are very happy with the bikes.

    I bought my Pagan Arrow as it was a cheap and crude steel bike with 36
    spoke wheels for £60. It takes my weight but to be honest when I'm a
    bit lighter I have a Kona Lanai to take its place. That has an
    aluminium frame and is generally nicer all round and about 50%
    lighter. I'm looking forward to riding that hopefully in a month or
    two.

    Many people here would say you would be better off getting a better
    brand even if that meant going secondhand. Really though its down to
    individual models.

    Parkers of Bolton are basically box shifters and the bike you receive
    will need fine tuning and setting up. They can be a little slow to
    sort out problems but are basically a good company. They charge £18
    for delivery now and so bare this in mind when bidding.
     
  3. Purple

    Purple Guest

    "Martin Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat, 17 Jul 2004 20:04:01 GMT, "Purple"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Hiya
    > >
    > >Does anyone know anything about Viking Targa or Beowulf bikes? They

    always
    > >seem to sell very well on eBay. Has anyone ever tried them?
    > >
    > >TIA
    > >
    > >Fran
    > >

    >
    > I've got a Pagan Arrow which is basically the same sort of bike and
    > was also supplied via Parkers of Bolton like many of those other
    > brands you listed.
    >
    > You basically get a bike based around a frame made in taiwan with
    > components made in either China or Taiwan.The brand is just something
    > that sounds acceptable to the european market especially germany.
    >
    > Almost all the top bike brands have their frames made in Taiwan at
    > least for their budget bottom end models. The taiwanese made frames
    > seem to be made very well where as chinese made frames are more hit
    > and miss.
    >
    > They are a small step up from the sterling house/universal type models
    > that feature chinese made frames. The actual components are pretty
    > much the same as most of the time its chinese made shimano stuff.
    >
    > Have a look at the feedback of some of the companies selling the bikes
    > to see what customers think of them. Looking at the Parkers of Bolton
    > site you will see most people are very happy with the bikes.
    >
    > I bought my Pagan Arrow as it was a cheap and crude steel bike with 36
    > spoke wheels for £60. It takes my weight but to be honest when I'm a
    > bit lighter I have a Kona Lanai to take its place. That has an
    > aluminium frame and is generally nicer all round and about 50%
    > lighter. I'm looking forward to riding that hopefully in a month or
    > two.
    >
    > Many people here would say you would be better off getting a better
    > brand even if that meant going secondhand. Really though its down to
    > individual models.
    >
    > Parkers of Bolton are basically box shifters and the bike you receive
    > will need fine tuning and setting up. They can be a little slow to
    > sort out problems but are basically a good company. They charge £18
    > for delivery now and so bare this in mind when bidding.


    Hi Martin,

    You might remember me from my post a couple of weeks ago when I was asking
    about which type of bike would be best for me. In the end I bought a
    Specialised Crossroads, which can I just say, that I absolutely love!!

    Since I bought it though my partner has decided he definitely wants a bike
    too but due to a little run of bad luck since I bought my bike, car got
    stolen, central heating broke down, we can't afford another bike like mine
    right now.

    It would be ideal if we could get another bike while the weather is good so
    we were looking at Targa as a temporary measure, then at the beginning of
    next summer he can buy a decent bike.

    I agree that we would be better off buying a secondhand bike but we can't
    find one that suits his build, he's a 6'4 ex profesional rugby player!

    I have told him to wait till we can get a better bike than a Targa but I
    think he's getting envious that I am going off for bike rides and leaving
    him to do the housework! or so he feels at least.

    I have a Trek trailer that my daughter rides in and it would be nice to go
    out as a family for her sake aswell. Also if he had a bike then he could
    pull the trailer which would mean that I wouldn't have to end up as a
    puffing strawberry faced wreck at first sight of a hill! lol

    Fran
     

  4. >Hi Martin,
    >
    >You might remember me from my post a couple of weeks ago when I was asking
    >about which type of bike would be best for me. In the end I bought a
    >Specialised Crossroads, which can I just say, that I absolutely love!!
    >
    >Since I bought it though my partner has decided he definitely wants a bike
    >too but due to a little run of bad luck since I bought my bike, car got
    >stolen, central heating broke down, we can't afford another bike like mine
    >right now.
    >
    >It would be ideal if we could get another bike while the weather is good so
    >we were looking at Targa as a temporary measure, then at the beginning of
    >next summer he can buy a decent bike.
    >
    >I agree that we would be better off buying a secondhand bike but we can't
    >find one that suits his build, he's a 6'4 ex profesional rugby player!
    >
    >I have told him to wait till we can get a better bike than a Targa but I
    >think he's getting envious that I am going off for bike rides and leaving
    >him to do the housework! or so he feels at least.
    >
    >I have a Trek trailer that my daughter rides in and it would be nice to go
    >out as a family for her sake aswell. Also if he had a bike then he could
    >pull the trailer which would mean that I wouldn't have to end up as a
    >puffing strawberry faced wreck at first sight of a hill! lol
    >
    >Fran
    >


    Considering his height and likely build he'd also probably be better
    off going for a basic hybrid bike with no suspension and preferably a
    steel frame. This will also make it the cheapest option. Also 36 spoke
    wheels would be a wise choice if possible. Basically you don't want to
    buy a bike with suspension at lower price levels as its rarely very
    good. I'm not speaking from experience myself but it seems to be the
    dominant view that low cost suspension is rubbish.
     
  5. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Purple
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Since I bought it though my partner has decided he definitely wants a
    > bike too but due to a little run of bad luck since I bought my bike,
    > car got stolen, central heating broke down, we can't afford another
    > bike like mine right now.
    >
    > It would be ideal if we could get another bike while the weather is
    > good so we were looking at Targa as a temporary measure, then at the
    > beginning of next summer he can buy a decent bike.


    Check out what's available second hand locally - in the classified ads
    in your local paper or on the supermarket "customers' adverts" board.
    Second hand bikes (unless they're very special) are cheap, and if the
    bike was half decent in the first place, then unless the frame of forks
    are bent or cracked a little bit of fettling will usually make it a
    decent bike again. You may have to replace a few components if they're
    worn out, but it's still better to have a half decent second hand bike
    than a crap new one.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    Anagram: I'm soon broke.
     
  6. Purple

    Purple Guest

    "Martin Wilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > >Hi Martin,
    > >
    > >You might remember me from my post a couple of weeks ago when I was

    asking
    > >about which type of bike would be best for me. In the end I bought a
    > >Specialised Crossroads, which can I just say, that I absolutely love!!
    > >
    > >Since I bought it though my partner has decided he definitely wants a

    bike
    > >too but due to a little run of bad luck since I bought my bike, car got
    > >stolen, central heating broke down, we can't afford another bike like

    mine
    > >right now.
    > >
    > >It would be ideal if we could get another bike while the weather is good

    so
    > >we were looking at Targa as a temporary measure, then at the beginning of
    > >next summer he can buy a decent bike.
    > >
    > >I agree that we would be better off buying a secondhand bike but we can't
    > >find one that suits his build, he's a 6'4 ex profesional rugby player!
    > >
    > >I have told him to wait till we can get a better bike than a Targa but I
    > >think he's getting envious that I am going off for bike rides and leaving
    > >him to do the housework! or so he feels at least.
    > >
    > >I have a Trek trailer that my daughter rides in and it would be nice to

    go
    > >out as a family for her sake aswell. Also if he had a bike then he could
    > >pull the trailer which would mean that I wouldn't have to end up as a
    > >puffing strawberry faced wreck at first sight of a hill! lol
    > >
    > >Fran
    > >

    >
    > Considering his height and likely build he'd also probably be better
    > off going for a basic hybrid bike with no suspension and preferably a
    > steel frame. This will also make it the cheapest option. Also 36 spoke
    > wheels would be a wise choice if possible. Basically you don't want to
    > buy a bike with suspension at lower price levels as its rarely very
    > good. I'm not speaking from experience myself but it seems to be the
    > dominant view that low cost suspension is rubbish.


    Hi Martin

    Thanks for the advice. I agree with you about the suspension, that's one of
    the reasons why I went for the Crossroads. Although I was also looking at a
    Trek bike for a similar price and the owner of a LBS (NOT the shop where I
    bought the Crossroads, a different shop) said that modern technology has
    come along so much that there is nothing wrong with front suspension in the
    sub £400 mark. But I have always been a firm believer in that you get what
    you pay for!

    My partner is long, tall and skinny, would steel still be the best bet? I
    thought that steel, esp. hi ten steel was always to be avoided

    Fran
     
  7. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Purple
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > My partner is long, tall and skinny, would steel still be the best
    > bet? I thought that steel, esp. hi ten steel was always to be avoided


    Judging by Martin's comments about 36 spoke wheels, I think he was
    picturing someone very large. Good steel frames are very good (Reynolds
    531 is very good, Reynolds 853 is among the best; there are good steel
    frame using Columbus tubes as well, and even basic chromium-molybdenum
    steel makes OK frames), but on the whole at least in sub-£800 pound
    bikes aluminium is now likely to be better.

    Steel frames are slightly springier than aluminium, and if bent or
    cracked can often be repaired (which aluminium generally can't) but the
    strength to weight ratio of the two materials isn't greatly different.
    The best steel frames are slightly stronger (but slightly heavier) than
    the best aluminium ones, and steel is still the preferred material for
    some touring frames and for many custom built frames.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; Perl ... is the Brittney Spears of programming - easily accessible
    ;; but, in the final analysis, empty of any significant thought
    ;; Frank Adrian on Slashdot, 21st July 2003
     

  8. >Hi Martin
    >
    >Thanks for the advice. I agree with you about the suspension, that's one of
    >the reasons why I went for the Crossroads. Although I was also looking at a
    >Trek bike for a similar price and the owner of a LBS (NOT the shop where I
    >bought the Crossroads, a different shop) said that modern technology has
    >come along so much that there is nothing wrong with front suspension in the
    >sub £400 mark. But I have always been a firm believer in that you get what
    >you pay for!
    >
    >My partner is long, tall and skinny, would steel still be the best bet? I
    >thought that steel, esp. hi ten steel was always to be avoided
    >
    >Fran
    >


    Sorry didn't realise he was skinny I'd assumed as he was an ex pro
    rugby player he might have been pretty chunky and combined with his
    height fairly weighty.

    My reasoning behind steel frames is reading that low cost aluminium
    frames have a higher failure rate than steel ones. Matched with the
    fact that when aluminium frames break they break badly rather than
    bend out of position like steel I just have this feeling that steel is
    better for a low cost bike for someone reasonably heavy. However from
    the sound of it he may well be better off with aluminium. I think the
    only thing that goes against high tensile steel is weight and
    therefore performance. High tensile steel offers good ride quality,
    strength and durability and also not forgetting low cost and safety
    due to strength.
     
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