Does lifting weights cause muscles to shrink?



I know this goes against logic, but after lifting weights during the
off-season (Nov. - Mar.), some of my muscles measure 5 - 15mm SMALLER
in Mar. than when I start in the fall. I realize I won't gain huge
muscles in this amount of time -- nor do I really want to -- but
shouldn't they get a LITTLE bit larger . . . or at the least, not get
smaller? Anyone ever hear of this happening? Could this indicate
some kind of medical problem? (My yearly blood tests are "normal.")
Or would I be better of doing one of those exercise-ball routines, or
something like that instead? (That would look to be a bit more fun.)
 
R

Roger Zoul

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
:: I know this goes against logic, but after lifting weights during the
:: off-season (Nov. - Mar.), some of my muscles measure 5 - 15mm SMALLER
:: in Mar. than when I start in the fall. I realize I won't gain huge
:: muscles in this amount of time -- nor do I really want to -- but
:: shouldn't they get a LITTLE bit larger . . . or at the least, not get
:: smaller? Anyone ever hear of this happening? Could this indicate
:: some kind of medical problem? (My yearly blood tests are "normal.")
:: Or would I be better of doing one of those exercise-ball routines, or
:: something like that instead? (That would look to be a bit more fun.)

Muscles don't get bigger just because you lift weights, you've got to eat
enough extra calories to support tissue growth. If you're not eating for
growth, it's very unlikely that you're get any. You can get stronger,
however.

Or course, who knows...maybe you lost some fat or something and they just
appear to be smaller. We can't know.
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Roger Zoul wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> :: I know this goes against logic, but after lifting weights during the
> :: off-season (Nov. - Mar.), some of my muscles measure 5 - 15mm SMALLER
> :: in Mar. than when I start in the fall. I realize I won't gain huge
> :: muscles in this amount of time -- nor do I really want to -- but
> :: shouldn't they get a LITTLE bit larger . . . or at the least, not get
> :: smaller? Anyone ever hear of this happening? Could this indicate
> :: some kind of medical problem? (My yearly blood tests are "normal.")
> :: Or would I be better of doing one of those exercise-ball routines, or
> :: something like that instead? (That would look to be a bit more fun.)
>
> Muscles don't get bigger just because you lift weights, you've got to eat
> enough extra calories to support tissue growth. If you're not eating for
> growth, it's very unlikely that you're get any. You can get stronger,
> however.
>
> Or course, who knows...maybe you lost some fat or something and they just
> appear to be smaller. We can't know.
>
>

What Roger said. You may be building up muscles but losing the fat on
your arms. When you make a muscle pose, are your biceps harder than they
were before training? Maybe you react slower than some, or, as Roger
said you really aren't eating enough protein. 1 to 2 weeks shows a big
improvement for me, but that involves lifting at least an hour a day to
the point where it becomes an aerobic sport. If you only go out (in?)
and do 12 reps of each exercise, then don't expect much. If you come
back in the house sweaty then you have done some good. You also didn't
mention your weight, as in gain, lose, stay the same??
Bill Baka
 
B

Bob

Guest
On Mar 3, 8:15 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> I know this goes against logic, but after lifting weights during the
> off-season (Nov. - Mar.), some of my muscles measure 5 - 15mm SMALLER
> in Mar. than when I start in the fall. I realize I won't gain huge
> muscles in this amount of time -- nor do I really want to -- but
> shouldn't they get a LITTLE bit larger . . . or at the least, not get
> smaller? Anyone ever hear of this happening? Could this indicate
> some kind of medical problem? (My yearly blood tests are "normal.")
> Or would I be better of doing one of those exercise-ball routines, or
> something like that instead? (That would look to be a bit more fun.)


How much riding do you do "in-season", what kind of lifting are you
doing, and what muscles appear to have shrunk? Even just 30 minutes
daily of hard riding for example is going to have a greater effect on
the size of your quadriceps than 5 reps with heavy weights done three
times a week. Unless you're a competitive bodybuilder, throw away the
tape measure and stop worrying.

Regards,
Bob
 
B

Bill Baka

Guest
Bob wrote:
> On Mar 3, 8:15 pm, [email protected] wrote:
>> I know this goes against logic, but after lifting weights during the
>> off-season (Nov. - Mar.), some of my muscles measure 5 - 15mm SMALLER
>> in Mar. than when I start in the fall. I realize I won't gain huge
>> muscles in this amount of time -- nor do I really want to -- but
>> shouldn't they get a LITTLE bit larger . . . or at the least, not get
>> smaller? Anyone ever hear of this happening? Could this indicate
>> some kind of medical problem? (My yearly blood tests are "normal.")
>> Or would I be better of doing one of those exercise-ball routines, or
>> something like that instead? (That would look to be a bit more fun.)

>
> How much riding do you do "in-season", what kind of lifting are you
> doing, and what muscles appear to have shrunk? Even just 30 minutes
> daily of hard riding for example is going to have a greater effect on
> the size of your quadriceps than 5 reps with heavy weights done three
> times a week. Unless you're a competitive bodybuilder, throw away the
> tape measure and stop worrying.
>
> Regards,
> Bob
>

I'm with Bob on this. If you are healthy (sounds like you are) then a
little seasonal change should be no big deal. Whether riding or lifting
weights the idea I would have is to try to work out at 'something'
enough to get your heart rate up for about a half an hour. If you have
stairs then spend your breaks or lunch either running or walking up and
down. Forget about elevators. Always park a car in the furthest spot
from the door of the store. All the little things add up. Your arms
might shrink a little because you may be subconsciously using your
muscles on the bars of the bike more than you think. Everyone seems to
think legs, but your arms do a fair bit of work on a 3 hour ride too.
Just take it all in and it should make sense, even if not what you
initially thought.
Spring and summer are coming, although a little different timing this year.
Bill Baka