Does Millar continue?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Callistus Valerius, Aug 6, 2004.

  1. There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any discussion
    on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when the
    suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he was
    restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take those
    hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his 800,000
    euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still has
    to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling accident?
    Where does David Millar, go from here?
     
    Tags:


  2. otto

    otto Guest

    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any discussion
    > on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when the
    > suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he was
    > restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    > taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take those
    > hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his 800,000
    > euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still has
    > to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling accident?
    > Where does David Millar, go from here?


    art school?
     
  3. "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any discussion
    > on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when the
    > suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he was
    > restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    > taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take those
    > hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his 800,000
    > euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still has
    > to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling accident?
    > Where does David Millar, go from here?


    It's all up to David. He can learn from these episodes and come back
    in like Spotty Dick, of he could say 'fsck it' and do something else,
    like race cars.
     
  4. Sonarrat

    Sonarrat Guest

    in article [email protected], Richard Adams at
    [email protected] wrote on 8/6/04 9:07 AM:

    > "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any discussion
    >> on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when the
    >> suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he was
    >> restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    >> taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take those
    >> hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his 800,000
    >> euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still has
    >> to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling accident?
    >> Where does David Millar, go from here?

    >
    > It's all up to David. He can learn from these episodes and come back
    > in like Spotty Dick, of he could say 'fsck it' and do something else,
    > like race cars.


    Or motorcycles? He's one hell of a bike handler, though I don't really know
    how it translates to heavier machinery.

    -Sonarrat.
     
  5. > > It's all up to David. He can learn from these episodes and come back
    > > in like Spotty Dick, of he could say 'fsck it' and do something else,
    > > like race cars.

    >
    > Or motorcycles? He's one hell of a bike handler, though I don't really

    know
    > how it translates to heavier machinery.
    >


    Or he could be some sort of UN bigwig. He claims to be a global
    citizen, so that would be a match.
     
  6. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Sonarrat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BD3914D1.765C%[email protected]
    > in article [email protected], Richard Adams

    at
    > [email protected] wrote on 8/6/04 9:07 AM:
    >
    > > "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > >> There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any

    discussion
    > >> on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when

    the
    > >> suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he

    was
    > >> restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    > >> taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take

    those
    > >> hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his

    800,000
    > >> euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still

    has
    > >> to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling

    accident?
    > >> Where does David Millar, go from here?

    > >
    > > It's all up to David. He can learn from these episodes and come back
    > > in like Spotty Dick, of he could say 'fsck it' and do something else,
    > > like race cars.

    >
    > Or motorcycles? He's one hell of a bike handler, though


    What makes you think that? He seems about typical (enough to get by anyway).
    The really exceptional bike handlers can probably ride heavier vehicles. It
    is the element of power and even higher speeds that makes the difference
    much more than weight.

    >I don't really know
    > how it translates to heavier machinery.
    >
    > -Sonarrat.
    >
     
  7. Sonarrat

    Sonarrat Guest

    in article [email protected], Chris at
    [email protected] wrote on 8/6/04 12:15 PM:

    >
    > "Sonarrat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BD3914D1.765C%[email protected]
    >> in article [email protected], Richard Adams

    > at
    >> [email protected] wrote on 8/6/04 9:07 AM:
    >>
    >>> "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:<[email protected]>...
    >>>> There was a long thread on Millar and epo, but I didn't see any

    > discussion
    >>>> on if he will continue. He's 28 (I think), so that makes him 30 when

    > the
    >>>> suspension is lifted. He's already said he will sell the mansion he

    > was
    >>>> restoring in Birrantz, France, and the supermodel he was supporting has
    >>>> taken off. Does Millar like to pay taxes, even Ja ja couldn't take

    > those
    >>>> hits, and moved to Switzerland. I doubt if he saved much of his

    > 800,000
    >>>> euros, between the taxman and the supermodel, so it's obvious he still

    > has
    >>>> to work. Will he wait for Liggett to have an unfortunate cycling

    > accident?
    >>>> Where does David Millar, go from here?
    >>>
    >>> It's all up to David. He can learn from these episodes and come back
    >>> in like Spotty Dick, of he could say 'fsck it' and do something else,
    >>> like race cars.

    >>
    >> Or motorcycles? He's one hell of a bike handler, though

    >
    > What makes you think that? He seems about typical (enough to get by anyway).


    No, Millar is exceptional. The Vuelta stage that he won last year was not
    drugs, it was entirely courtesy of his superlative descending skills.

    > The really exceptional bike handlers can probably ride heavier vehicles. It
    > is the element of power and even higher speeds that makes the difference
    > much more than weight.
     
  8. TritonRider

    TritonRider Guest

    >From: Sonarrat [email protected]ail

    >No, Millar is exceptional. The Vuelta stage that he won last year was not
    >drugs, it was entirely courtesy of his superlative descending skills.
    >


    I think that most of the smaller pro racers could transition to the 250s
    fairly easily as a lot of the riding skills are similar, at least in my
    opinion.
    In the bigger categories "He who brakes last wins" and then has the power to
    get back out quicker. I haven't ridden a 250 racer in years but it used to be
    that to be fast you needed to be smooth, there was a premium on keeping your
    speed up, and picking the fastest line with the least braking was critical.
    These are all skills any winning bicycle racer has to have.
    Bill C
     
  9. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "TritonRider" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >From: Sonarrat [email protected]ail

    >
    > >No, Millar is exceptional. The Vuelta stage that he won last year was

    not
    > >drugs, it was entirely courtesy of his superlative descending skills.
    > >

    >
    > I think that most of the smaller pro racers could transition to the 250s
    > fairly easily as a lot of the riding skills are similar, at least in my
    > opinion.


    Then maybe I should give it a shot. I rarely lose any ground to any cyclists
    of any category on decents or any corners and can normally count on the to
    close gaps or make one on my own. I don't think my moto slills are anything
    that great but maybe I have not tried hard enough. FWIW, I am also pretty
    fast on 4 wheels on circuits so although you might think I am being
    sarcastic, I am sort-of serious.

    > In the bigger categories "He who brakes last wins" and then has the power

    to
    > get back out quicker. I haven't ridden a 250 racer in years but it used to

    be
    > that to be fast you needed to be smooth, there was a premium on keeping

    your
    > speed up, and picking the fastest line with the least braking was

    critical.



    > These are all skills any winning bicycle racer has to have.
    > Bill C


    I am sorry, but there is a much larger range in the bike handling skills of
    the pros than most seem to think. You can win LOTS of races by going fast,
    especially on hills but still SUCK at riding at the limit of the roads. That
    is just the state of things. I am not even talking about Tyler bad (who for
    all I know simply has bad luck and poor vision). There are some guys that
    just totally suck. I can't think of any right off the top of my head (this
    generation seems to be a bit better, (or maybe the bikes, tires and brakes
    are).
     
  10. TritonRider

    TritonRider Guest

    >From: "Chris" [email protected]
    >Date: 8/7/2004 1:58 PM Eastern


    >I am sorry, but there is a much larger range in the bike handling skills of
    >the pros than most seem to think. You can win LOTS of races by going fast,
    >especially on hills but still SUCK at riding at the limit of the roads. That
    >is just the state of things. I am not even talking about Tyler bad (who for
    >all I know simply has bad luck and poor vision). There are some guys that
    >just totally suck. I can't think of any right off the top of my head (this
    >generation seems to be a bit better, (or maybe the bikes, tires and brakes
    >are).
    >
    >
    >


    Chris I think anyone who could make it to the pros as a bicycle racer has a
    lot of the same skills to race 250s. I know there is a huge spread inhandling,
    but there is in motrorcycling too.
    I know we've got some people around here who have been involved in racing more
    recently than me, maybe they have a more accurate opinion.
    Bill C
     
  11. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (TritonRider) wrote:

    > >From: "Chris" [email protected]
    > >Date: 8/7/2004 1:58 PM Eastern

    >
    > >I am sorry, but there is a much larger range in the bike handling skills of
    > >the pros than most seem to think. You can win LOTS of races by going fast,
    > >especially on hills but still SUCK at riding at the limit of the roads. That
    > >is just the state of things. I am not even talking about Tyler bad (who for
    > >all I know simply has bad luck and poor vision). There are some guys that
    > >just totally suck. I can't think of any right off the top of my head (this
    > >generation seems to be a bit better, (or maybe the bikes, tires and brakes
    > >are).
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Chris I think anyone who could make it to the pros as a bicycle racer has a
    > lot of the same skills to race 250s. I know there is a huge spread
    > in handling, but there is in motrorcycling too.
    > I know we've got some people around here who have been involved in racing
    > more recently than me, maybe they have a more accurate opinion.
    > Bill C


    If I was the typical, average sized, light-weight cycle racer and wanted
    to go motorcycle roadracing, I'd start with a season on 125s. They are
    physically small bikes, but they are also absurdly light. The lower
    horsepower they have really emphasizes corner speed and smoothness (i.e.
    minimal use of the brakes). Those are features that seem most similar to
    bicycle racing to me. Then take a step up to 250s, which have the same
    characteristics (as you mentioned earlier), just less so than 125s. You
    have to learn what to do with the extra power that 250s have.

    One thing that would be sort of important in this is for the rider to
    work on getting some upper body strength.

    Ryan Cousineau has raced motos before, and I believe Carl Sundquist has
    some experience on tracks, too.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    So far, so good, so what?

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
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