Does the ultimate cold weather cycling glove exist?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by jojoma, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. jojoma

    jojoma New Member

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    I know I am going to get flamed for not searching, but I have searched and some of the threads are a bit old.

    I recently purchased Sugoi Toaster gloves, and really liked them until temps got below 40F. During a 3-hour ride, my fingers went from nice and cozy, to complete icicles on a mountain descent. It took me until the following morning to get feeling back in my fingers. One of the reasons for the intense cold may have been because my hands were sweating in the gloves on the climb before the descent.

    Anyone happy with their gloves?

    I might look into ski gloves. Reusch or one of those ski glove makers must make some warm gloves...

    Thanks
     
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  2. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    Windstopper 'MITTENS' with wool fingered liners. Warm hands to 20 degrees F or so.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    40ºF isn't that cold ... so, it is definitely because your gloves got wet that you encountered the problems you had -- you were simulating putting your hands in a bucket of ice water for however long it took for you to descend.

    FWIW. In temps from about 28ºF, and above, I wear my regular cycling gloves (the OLD style with the crocheted backs + leather palms, BTW) UNDER a pair of [Pearl Izumi, in my case, but any brand of with a leather-or-gripping/("rubber") PALM surface will do] knit gloves.

    I have found that mimicking the stuff you would wear for Cross Country skiing (a high exertion sport if you aren't simply flopping around in a city park) generally works as a starting point EXCEPT that you would (I have) substitute(d) GLOVES for (wind) MITTENS/(shells). A key difference is that you probably won't be going faster than 12mph (if that fast) & 20mph (on a descent, if that fast) otherwise when XC skiiing, so the need for WIND resistant pants is less (but, a wind shell is a really good idea) when XC skiing.

    If I were riding in colder temps (than 28ºF ... some people do ... that's MY lower limit!), then I might (as in, more than likely) opt for a pair of leather downhill ski gloves which I would treat with some SnoSeal (the gloves will still breath) ... at least, for the descent (i.e., I would change gloves).

    With regard to Peter's suggestion of wearing the wind mittens over knit gloves, MY XC wind mittens are too "baggy" and would only work with non-integrated brakes because shifting would become very awkward ... same would probably be true with your MTB shifters unless you happen to use grip shifts.
     
  4. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Some gloves from Lowe Alpine, made for ice climing and the like. Kept my digits warmisn, when pressed up against ice, at 0°. Short of that, mittens with a separate Gore-Tex or microfiber shell and polar fleece mitt inners. Also, Outdoor Research expedition gloves are pretty warm, just not so durable.
     
  5. jayhunter

    jayhunter New Member

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    Assos has 3 glove set (liner, glove, lobster lookng shell). I have been out as low as 30 degrees with just 1st 2 on and they work greath. I have not used the lobster shell yet.
     
  6. BikingBrian

    BikingBrian New Member

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    Pearl Izumi lobster gloves have been good to me down to about -20c (-4F). That was the limit for me. Below that, my fingers started to get painful. Above 12C (45-50F?) they get a bit warm. Pushing computer buttons is a little tricky, but shifting is no problem with the lobster split. Somewhat waterproof, very windproof, and breathable. Not pricy, either. All-around, I'd say good value for true winter gloves. http://www.rei.com/product/741054
     
  7. benkoostra

    benkoostra New Member

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  8. Bob Ross

    Bob Ross New Member

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    My wife swears by these. She is notoriously susceptible to cold hands, but ever since buying these PI Lobster gloves, the only complaints I've heard are that her hands are too warm!

    On the other hand, they do make shifting a tad difficult. So it depends what your definition of "ultimate" is.
     
  9. kopride

    kopride Member

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    Neoprene hunting gloves from Wal-Mart or any outdoor suppliers are great. They stay warm even when wet and you can still use your hands. Here is an example at Cabelas for $18.00. http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0047717960456a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntk=Products&QueryText=neoprene+gloves&sort=all&Go.y=6&_D%3AhasJS=+&N=0&Nty=1&hasJS=true&Go.x=29&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearch-box.jsp.form23&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1
    You can get them for under $20. If you read the reviews in Cabela's website, it is pretty funny that these hunters do not realize that neoprene is not water proof, that's why they call it a "wet suit," it does tend to stay warm even when wet, which is key. Alaskan fisherman wear them.

    In true sub zero artic conditions, there is a type of small sleeping bag that basically slips over your handle bars and you put your gloved hand inside when your hands are on the bars. There is a picture of it in this months bicycling magazine. Also, your local motorcycle shop is a great source for warm gloves. As cold as it gets on a bike, it is twice as cold on a motorcycle.
     
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