Does whey protein cause allergies?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Jun 19, 2005.

  1. Some people on the main allergies newsgroup are claiming that whey
    protein is a dangerous, processed food that is unnatural and best
    avoided. Yet, I have always heard that, next to whole eggs, whey
    protein is an ideal, perfectly natural protein source. Who has it
    right here? Is consuming all this whey actually a good idea?

    In addition, the allergy people claim that consuming whey may likely
    cause a people to develop a food allergy. Is this true as well?

    Just some food for thought (no pun intended).

    Swann
     
    Tags:


  2. Chingy

    Chingy Guest

    Well you dun have to eat it on every ocassion you can limit it to drink just
    after workout and b4 you goto bed thus eliminating any food alergies if u
    may have one..

    Combine with egg whites and natural food and use it as supplement not actual
    diet than its ok...

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Some people on the main allergies newsgroup are claiming that whey
    > protein is a dangerous, processed food that is unnatural and best
    > avoided. Yet, I have always heard that, next to whole eggs, whey
    > protein is an ideal, perfectly natural protein source. Who has it
    > right here? Is consuming all this whey actually a good idea?
    >
    > In addition, the allergy people claim that consuming whey may likely
    > cause a people to develop a food allergy. Is this true as well?
    >
    > Just some food for thought (no pun intended).
    >
    > Swann
    >
    >
     
  3. David  Cohen

    David Cohen Guest

    "Chingy" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Well you dun have to eat it on every ocassion you can limit it to drink
    > just after workout and b4 you goto bed thus eliminating any food alergies
    > if u may have one..


    So, if you eat a food you're allergic to "just after workout and b4 you goto
    bed", there's no problem.

    How do they say "retarded" in your native language?

    David
     
  4. >How do they say "retarded" in your native language?>

    Why misalign the retarded by grouping them in there with him?
     
  5. David

    David Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >How do they say "retarded" in your native language?>

    >
    > Why misalign the retarded by grouping them in there with him?


    you are maligning this entire group by misaligning the retarded.
     
  6. rick++

    rick++ Guest

    Many adults, especially non-Europeans cant
    easily digest lactose. Some of that may be in
    the whey depending on how it is prepared.
     
  7. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Some people on the main allergies newsgroup are claiming that whey
    >protein is a dangerous, processed food that is unnatural and best
    >avoided. Yet, I have always heard that, next to whole eggs, whey
    >protein is an ideal, perfectly natural protein source. Who has it
    >right here? Is consuming all this whey actually a good idea?
    >
    >In addition, the allergy people claim that consuming whey may likely
    >cause a people to develop a food allergy. Is this true as well?


    I doubt it causes allergies, but if you're slightly allergic
    to the proteins in it, concentrating them like that will certainly
    give you a reaction.

    >Just some food for thought (no pun intended).


    You have to remember that MOST people who think they have
    a lot of allergies are the victims of weak correlations.

    They eat an apple, get the runs, think they have an
    allergy to apples for ten years, try an apple, have no
    problem, realize what a moron they are...

    I've known other people who were diagnosed with multiple
    allergies and suffered a tedious decade of avoiding
    very common foods (try eating nothing with wheat, eggs,
    lettuce, or peanuts for just one day), only to be correctly
    diagnosed with thyroid disease, which is fairly easily
    managed.

    --Blair
    "Check your doctor for real degrees."
     
  8. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    On 19 Jun 2005 05:43:15 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >Some people on the main allergies newsgroup are claiming that whey
    >protein is a dangerous, processed food that is unnatural and best
    >avoided. Yet, I have always heard that, next to whole eggs, whey
    >protein is an ideal, perfectly natural protein source. Who has it
    >right here? Is consuming all this whey actually a good idea?
    >
    >In addition, the allergy people claim that consuming whey may likely
    >cause a people to develop a food allergy. Is this true as well?
    >
    >Just some food for thought (no pun intended).


    Whey occurs naturally in many dairy products. Some people will
    develop allergies to a variety of foods and supplements. If you get
    gas or bloating after having a specific protein powder, just try a
    different one. Some nutritionists have also recommended rotating the
    brand of protein powder you use occassionally to prevent any allergy
    development. I personally have never had a problem with any whey
    protein powder I've tried.

    A lot of extreme nutritionists have a big problem with dairy in
    general, claiming casein is nothing more than elmer's glue in your gut
    and other ridiculous nonsense. Either you can tolerate dairy, or you
    cannot. If you can, it is a great source of protein and both milk and
    protein powders derived from it (either whey or casein) can be
    effectively used to help meet many nutritional needs of serious
    trainers. Most people find supplementing their diet with a quality
    protein powder, usually a whey protein powder, helps them gain muscle
    faster along with other positive health benefits. Results speak
    louder than words.
     
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