Dog owners!

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by JEB1, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. JEB1

    JEB1 Guest

    Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog bite
    in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    Lincoln and Harby. I know these things happen from time to time and I'm sure
    have been done to death here before, but I thought you might be amused by
    the ensuing conversation.

    Owner: Sorry. He's not vicious, (This with the creature's teeth still
    clamped on to my calf!) Anyway he doesn't like bicycles".
    Me: You do know this is a cycle track? So you might expect the odd bicycle
    to pass by from time to time."
    Owner: "Yes but I let him off the lead because there's a bend there and he
    can't see bicycles coming round it...."

    Fortunately no serious damage done to me. I have a bruise but no puncture
    wounds. Kudos to Aldi's long winter cycling trousers, which also seemed
    pretty undamaged when I got home.
     
    Tags:


  2. Alan Holmes

    Alan Holmes Guest

    "JEB1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    > apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog
    > bite
    > in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    > Lincoln and Harby. I know these things happen from time to time and I'm
    > sure
    > have been done to death here before, but I thought you might be amused by
    > the ensuing conversation.
    >
    > Owner: Sorry. He's not vicious, (This with the creature's teeth still
    > clamped on to my calf!) Anyway he doesn't like bicycles".
    > Me: You do know this is a cycle track? So you might expect the odd bicycle
    > to pass by from time to time."
    > Owner: "Yes but I let him off the lead because there's a bend there and he
    > can't see bicycles coming round it...."
    >
    > Fortunately no serious damage done to me. I have a bruise but no puncture
    > wounds. Kudos to Aldi's long winter cycling trousers, which also seemed
    > pretty undamaged when I got home.


    When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump as
    we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted I will
    never know, but it was very satifying!

    Alan

    >
    >
    >
     
  3. MartinM

    MartinM Guest

    JEB1 wrote:


    Kudos to Aldi's long winter cycling trousers, which also seemed
    > pretty undamaged when I got home.


    Indeed, I fell off wearing some a few weeks ago (stealth kerb in Hyde
    Park) and they were untouched, even though I had two open grazes under
    them.
     
  4. JEB1 wrote:
    > Owner: Sorry. He's not vicious, (This with the creature's teeth still
    > clamped on to my calf!) Anyway he doesn't like bicycles".
    > Me: You do know this is a cycle track? So you might expect the odd bicycle
    > to pass by from time to time."
    > Owner: "Yes but I let him off the lead because there's a bend there and he
    > can't see bicycles coming round it...."


    Fortunately I've never been bitten. Constantly having to stop because
    dog walkers have dogs off leads and running all over the place,
    especially on cycle paths/lanes.

    I think I tend to remember the bad experiences more, because there are
    dog walkers who let their dogs run around on said cycle routes (which I
    think is wrong) but when they see a bike the owner catches the dog and
    holds it at the side.

    peter
     
  5. Tosspot

    Tosspot Guest

    JEB1 wrote:
    > Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    > apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog bite
    > in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    > Lincoln and Harby.


    <snip>

    <rant>
    I don't do dogs. The last episode I had with a Rotweiller involved me
    explaining to its owner I'd kick it up and down the streeet if it so
    much as looked at me. He looked shocked. In my defense, I gave the
    last dog (admittedly a corgi[1]) a good kicking.
    </rant>

    Most of the time I love dogs, but when one has a go at me on a bike, I
    just see red, plus the fact I out mass them 5:1 :)

    <sigh> the dog brigade will be out in force now.

    [1] They are dumb, you kick 'em and they come back for more, you kick
    'em again, they come back. You can carry this on all day 'till your
    kicking mush.
     
  6. Alan Holmes wrote:
    >
    > When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    > would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump as
    > we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted I will
    > never know, but it was very satifying!


    Wouldn't it have been more satisfying & appropriate for you to each
    clout the dog's owner as you passed? It's hardly the mutt's fault it
    hadn't been trained :)
     
  7. Alan Holmes

    Alan Holmes Guest

    "Russell Fulker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Alan Holmes wrote:
    >>
    >> When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    >> would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump
    >> as we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted
    >> I will never know, but it was very satifying!

    >
    > Wouldn't it have been more satisfying & appropriate for you to each clout
    > the dog's owner as you passed? It's hardly the mutt's fault it hadn't
    > been trained :)


    On reflection that would have been much more satisfying, but I suspect the
    owners were not close enough!

    But it's an idea worth remembering!:)-)

    Alan
     
  8. Pinky

    Pinky Guest

    "JEB1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    > apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog
    > bite
    > in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    > Lincoln and Harby. I know these things happen from time to time and I'm
    > sure
    > have been done to death here before, but I thought you might be amused by
    > the ensuing conversation.
    >
    > Owner: Sorry. He's not vicious, (This with the creature's teeth still
    > clamped on to my calf!) Anyway he doesn't like bicycles".
    > Me: You do know this is a cycle track? So you might expect the odd bicycle
    > to pass by from time to time."
    > Owner: "Yes but I let him off the lead because there's a bend there and he
    > can't see bicycles coming round it...."
    >
    > Fortunately no serious damage done to me. I have a bruise but no puncture
    > wounds. Kudos to Aldi's long winter cycling trousers, which also seemed
    > pretty undamaged when I got home.
    >
    >


    On quite a few occasions I have been menaced by barking, teeth bared dogs
    and I have made clear to their owners that I would exact severe retribution
    on an animal if it approached me in such a manner . Many many times the
    response is " oh my dog wouldn't hurt a fly" and they are amazed that I
    should consider such a reaction as to kick their defenceless ( and vicious)
    pet.

    I must say that there is an increasing awareness that dog must be kept under
    control and probably over 50% are controlled reasonable well on leash.

    BUT, ---- you can't tell which are the ones which are potential attackers.
    Many walkers will take hold of their free roaming dogs when a cyclists
    approaches but an awful lot of them don't and even when they do it is often
    a last minute job.

    I make a point of releasing the appropriate foot from my pedal as I
    approach any free or long leashed dog, together with an toot of my horn. And
    I make my intent very clear. I have on a number of occasions administered a
    kick to some slavering "harmless" pet.

    Funnily enough there just doesn't seem to be the same problem with dogs in
    the countries I have visited in Europe despite reading of other cyclists
    encounters in the wilds. In France it is normal when passing through a
    village for a dog to follow you barking and running for the length of its
    available garden but they are seen roaming around loose as in UK. Elsewhere
    in, Germany , Austria it only became a minor problem in large cities where
    dogs were walked on cycling approaches but it was never as bad as in England
    where every one and his mothers aunt seems to own a smelly, paranoid, path
    fouling, "pet".

    I just personally hate the fact the people let their dogs approach me, as a
    pedestrian, and expect me to allow it to sniff and lick and even jump up at
    me. They are surprised when I tell them that I will not tolerate such
    behaviour and tell them to control their animals.

    I once came up to my locked bike to find a dog , on a leash, peeing up
    against my bike, so I kicked it off. The owner seemed to be unaware of any
    problem and expressed his displeasure. I apologised to him and said that I
    had made a mistake and should, in fact, have kicked him and not the dog!

    --
    Trevor A Panther
    In South Yorkshire,
    England, United Kingdom.
     
  9. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    Alan Holmes wrote:

    > When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    > would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump as
    > we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted I will
    > never know, but it was very satifying!
    >
    > Alan


    That must have made you all feel like tough guys.

    I find that shouting "Get to bed!" works well with dogs. All dogs know
    what that means ;-)

    bfn,

    Tony B
     
  10. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    Tosspot wrote:

    > [1] They are dumb, you kick 'em and they come back for more, you kick
    > 'em again, they come back. You can carry this on all day 'till your
    > kicking mush.


    Just like children eh.

    Tony B
     
  11. Tosspot

    Tosspot Guest

    Tony B wrote:
    > Tosspot wrote:
    >
    >> [1] They are dumb, you kick 'em and they come back for more, you kick
    >> 'em again, they come back. You can carry this on all day 'till your
    >> kicking mush.

    >
    > Just like children eh.


    That's naughty. At least kids dont run after you biting your ankles.
    What is it with perfectly normal dogs when they see a bike? Recumbents
    seem to confuse them, but two wheels must look a Fed-Ex delivery of
    Big-Macs to anything bigger than a rat on a leash.
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    naked_draughtsman wrote:
    >
    > Fortunately I've never been bitten. Constantly having to stop because
    > dog walkers have dogs off leads and running all over the place,
    > especially on cycle paths/lanes.
    >


    Well if you will use psychlepaths. Riding on the road I very rarely
    have any problems with dogs and their owners


    --
    Tony

    "The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
    right."
    - Lord Hailsham
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>, Tosspot wrote:
    >much as looked at me. He looked shocked. In my defense, I gave the
    >last dog (admittedly a corgi[1]) a good kicking.

    [...]
    >[1] They are dumb, you kick 'em and they come back for more, you kick
    >'em again, they come back.


    Weren't they originally bred as cattle herding dogs (back when cattle
    walked miles to market because lorries hadn't been invented)?
    Moving cows along by nipping at their ankles involves ignoring the
    occasional kick.
    That's no excuse for the owners not keeping it under control if it
    instinctively tries to bite people the same way though.
     
  14. Al C-F

    Al C-F Guest

    naked_draughtsman wrote:

    >
    > I think I tend to remember the bad experiences more, because there are
    > dog walkers who let their dogs run around on said cycle routes (which I
    > think is wrong) but when they see a bike the owner catches the dog and
    > holds it at the side.


    The last time I met an unrestrained dog on the cyclepath/footpath, I
    rode on ignoring the presence of the dog in the same way that its owner
    ignored my presence.

    Had it not been for its almost cat-like agility as the gap between my
    front wheel and the ground narrowed around it, I would have chopped it
    in half.

    The owner then noticed me enough to speak. But this wasn't to apologise
    for ignoring HC rule 42.
     
  15. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "JEB1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    > apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog

    bite
    > in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    > Lincoln and Harby. I know these things happen from time to time and I'm

    sure
    > have been done to death here before, but I thought you might be amused by
    > the ensuing conversation.
    >


    Q: What do dogs/dog owners & cyclists have in common?
    A: Only the bad ones are noticed.


    --
    Pete
    http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/Stuff
     
  16. >Well if you will use psychlepaths. Riding on the road I very rarely have any problems with dogs and their owners

    On my first visit to Ireland (1981) - all on roads - I was chased by
    dogs but never caught (I was fitter then). Then one day I saw a dog
    across the road that seemed to be getting ready to chase me (I could
    read the signs by then) - however a car passing between us made it give
    up that idea. I stopped and looked at it - it looked at me - and then I
    got on and rode away slowly and it ignored me. I think it's the speed
    that turns them on.

    On subsequent visits the problem has all but gone away. The only time
    I've been bitten was by a Jack Russell when pushing bike up a steep
    hill, which would never have caught me riding. (Saved by trousers).
     
  17. Alan Holmes

    Alan Holmes Guest

    "Tony B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Alan Holmes wrote:
    >
    >> When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    >> would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump
    >> as we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted
    >> I will never know, but it was very satifying!
    >>
    >> Alan

    >
    > That must have made you all feel like tough guys.


    Not at all a question of being 'tough' but of an attempt to protect the
    ladies in the group.

    Do you care about anyone else?

    Alan

    >
    > I find that shouting "Get to bed!" works well with dogs. All dogs know
    > what that means ;-)
    >
    > bfn,
    >
    > Tony B
     
  18. dave

    dave Guest

    Alan Holmes wrote:
    > "Tony B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Alan Holmes wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    >>>would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump
    >>>as we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted
    >>>I will never know, but it was very satifying!
    >>>
    >>>Alan

    >>
    >>That must have made you all feel like tough guys.

    >
    >
    > Not at all a question of being 'tough' but of an attempt to protect the
    > ladies in the group.
    >
    > Do you care about anyone else?
    >
    > Alan
    >
    >
    >>I find that shouting "Get to bed!" works well with dogs. All dogs know
    >>what that means ;-)
    >>
    >>bfn,
    >>
    >>Tony B

    >
    >
    >

    Dogs are fine. Good protein. Healthy. Probably parisite free. And
    nothing that tries to eat you should object to being dinner.

    Funny how mentioning that if the dog bites you its lunch.. upsets the
    owners.

    Dave
     
  19. elyob

    elyob Guest

    "Alan Holmes" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "JEB1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Hi - My first post here, but I have been lurking for quite a while. - So
    >> apologies if I commit some horrible usenet solecism. Got my first dog
    >> bite
    >> in three years today, pedalling along the National Cycle Network between
    >> Lincoln and Harby. I know these things happen from time to time and I'm
    >> sure
    >> have been done to death here before, but I thought you might be amused by
    >> the ensuing conversation.
    >>
    >> Owner: Sorry. He's not vicious, (This with the creature's teeth still
    >> clamped on to my calf!) Anyway he doesn't like bicycles".
    >> Me: You do know this is a cycle track? So you might expect the odd
    >> bicycle
    >> to pass by from time to time."
    >> Owner: "Yes but I let him off the lead because there's a bend there and
    >> he
    >> can't see bicycles coming round it...."
    >>
    >> Fortunately no serious damage done to me. I have a bruise but no puncture
    >> wounds. Kudos to Aldi's long winter cycling trousers, which also seemed
    >> pretty undamaged when I got home.

    >
    > When I cycled with a group, if there was a dog which was chasing us, we
    > would all get hold of our pumps and each of us would give the dog a thump
    > as we passed, whether the damned dog got the idea that it was not wanted I
    > will never know, but it was very satifying!
    >


    I always carry a sack and a brick, in case I'm attacked by a cat.
     
  20. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    dave wrote:

    > Dogs are fine. Good protein. Healthy. Probably parisite free. And
    > nothing that tries to eat you should object to being dinner.


    Remeber, a dog is not just for Christmas Day - save some for the
    sandwiches on Boxing Day.

    Tony B
     
Loading...
Loading...