Domestic Bike Locker

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Simon, May 25, 2003.

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  1. Simon

    Simon Guest

    I'm considering a large, secure domestic bike locker, I know http://www.cycle-works.com/ has them
    but what do they cost? Any other suppliers?

    Ta
     
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  2. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Simon wrote:
    > I'm considering a large, secure domestic bike locker, I know http://www.cycle-works.com/ has them
    > but what do they cost? Any other suppliers?
    >
    > Ta

    Timely question - I'm going to have to store that new bike outside. Now I know it's not ideal but I
    think it's going to be inevitable.

    What do you lot think of a custom built "locker" attached to my garden wall - the bike would have to
    be stored vertically. Security fixings aside, would it be OK to hang the bike from a hook through
    the rear wheel? On the point of security fixings what would you recommend?

    Painted "park bench green" I can't convince myself it would be an asset to the frontage but I can
    see no other way of storing it. At least I'd have the satisfaction of padlocking the box and then
    securing it again inside (kryptonite style lock perhaps?).
     
  3. Cicero

    Cicero Guest

    "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Simon wrote:
    > > I'm considering a large, secure domestic bike locker, I know http://www.cycle-works.com/ has
    > > them but what do they cost? Any other suppliers?
    > >
    > > Ta
    >
    > Timely question - I'm going to have to store that new bike outside. Now I know it's not ideal but
    > I think it's going to be inevitable.
    >
    > What do you lot think of a custom built "locker" attached to my garden wall - the bike would have
    > to be stored vertically. Security fixings
    aside,
    > would it be OK to hang the bike from a hook through the rear wheel? On
    the
    > point of security fixings what would you recommend?
    >
    > Painted "park bench green" I can't convince myself it would be an asset to the frontage but I can
    > see no other way of storing it. At least I'd have the satisfaction of padlocking the box and then
    > securing it again inside (kryptonite style lock perhaps?).
    >
    >
    =============
    I had a small shed made to measure by a local shed maker. It sits on a paved area at the front of my
    house and it's painted to blend in with the house colour. It cost me about £100-00 and I added a
    steel security bar on the floor to which I can secure the trike using a cable lock. I notified my
    house insurance company and they added a clause to my policy to cover the trike at little or no
    extra cost.

    You can buy 'utility' hooks at Focus which attach to a wall or door. My mountain bike hangs on two
    of these by the handle bars with the saddle and handle bars facing the wall. It's quick and easy and
    does no harm to bike or wall.

    Cic.
     
  4. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Cicero wrote:
    > =============
    > I had a small shed made to measure by a local shed maker. It sits on a paved area at the front of
    > my house and it's painted to blend in with the house colour. It cost me about £100-00 and I added
    > a steel security bar on the floor to which I can secure the trike using a cable lock. I notified
    > my house insurance company and they added a clause to my policy to cover the trike at little or no
    > extra cost.
    >
    > You can buy 'utility' hooks at Focus which attach to a wall or door. My mountain bike hangs on two
    > of these by the handle bars with the saddle and handle bars facing the wall. It's quick and easy
    > and does no harm to bike or wall.
    >
    > Cic.

    What I have in mind is a -vertical- "cupboard" as narrow as possible as it will attach to a side
    wall abutting the house (front garden falls away steeply and this would be at the bottom). So I'd
    like to make it as slim as possible say 15-18" (?). I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain
    it with the rear (so I can turn the bars sideways - if that makes sense?) and hang the bike from
    the rear wheel. Putting anchors for security in the wall shouldn't be a problem together with a
    padlock outside.

    Still think it's viable/OK?
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Tenex wrote:
    > Cicero wrote:
    >> =============
    >> I had a small shed made to measure by a local shed maker. It sits on a paved area at the front of
    >> my house and it's painted to blend in with the house colour. It cost me about £100-00 and I added
    >> a steel security bar on the floor to which I can secure the trike using a cable lock. I notified
    >> my house insurance company and they added a clause to my policy to cover the trike at little or
    >> no extra cost.
    >>
    >> You can buy 'utility' hooks at Focus which attach to a wall or door. My mountain bike hangs on
    >> two of these by the handle bars with the saddle and handle bars facing the wall. It's quick and
    >> easy and does no harm to bike or wall.
    >>
    >> Cic.
    >
    > What I have in mind is a -vertical- "cupboard" as narrow as possible as it will attach to a side
    > wall abutting the house (front garden falls away steeply and this would be at the bottom). So I'd
    > like to make it as slim as possible say 15-18" (?). I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and
    > chain it with the rear (so I can turn the bars sideways - if that makes sense?) and hang the bike
    > from the rear wheel. Putting anchors for security in the wall shouldn't be a problem together with
    > a padlock outside.
    >
    > Still think it's viable/OK?

    Yup .. I hang three bikes up, two by their rear wheels, one by it's front wheel, and none have
    suffered any problems at all.

    --

    Completed 1705 Seti work units in 12954 hours http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
    PS, Extra Smileys in my posts are to bug K Man .. ;)
     
  6. Cicero

    Cicero Guest

    "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Cicero wrote:
    > > =============
    > > I had a small shed made to measure by a local shed maker. It sits on a paved area at the front
    > > of my house and it's painted to blend in with the house colour. It cost me about £100-00 and I
    > > added a steel security bar on the floor to which I can secure the trike using a cable lock. I
    > > notified my house insurance company and they added a clause to my policy to cover the trike at
    > > little or no extra cost.
    > >
    > > You can buy 'utility' hooks at Focus which attach to a wall or door. My mountain bike hangs on
    > > two of these by the handle bars with the saddle and handle bars facing the wall. It's quick and
    > > easy and does no harm to bike or wall.
    > >
    > > Cic.
    >
    > What I have in mind is a -vertical- "cupboard" as narrow as possible as it will attach to a side
    > wall abutting the house (front garden falls away steeply and this would be at the bottom). So I'd
    > like to make it as slim
    as
    > possible say 15-18" (?). I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain
    it
    > with the rear (so I can turn the bars sideways - if that makes sense?) and hang the bike from the
    > rear wheel. Putting anchors for security in the
    wall
    > shouldn't be a problem together with a padlock outside.
    >
    > Still think it's viable/OK?
    >
    >
    ==============
    Yes, it's certainly viable. What we're discussing is after all only an unusually shaped shed. I
    believe B&Q sell an upright garden store made from plastic which you might be able to use. The only
    minor drawback with your requirements is having to remove / refit the front wheel every time. Are
    there such things as folding handlebars which (if they exist) would allow you to hang the bike
    without dismantling anything?

    Cic.
     
  7. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Cicero wrote:

    > ==============
    > Yes, it's certainly viable. What we're discussing is after all only an unusually shaped shed. I
    > believe B&Q sell an upright garden store made from plastic which you might be able to use. The
    > only minor drawback with your requirements is having to remove / refit the front wheel every time.
    > Are there such things as folding handlebars which (if they exist) would allow you to hang the bike
    > without dismantling anything?
    >
    > Cic.

    Don't know, maybe worth a look. Thanks to you and Paul for the feedback.

    You're right, B&Q do have some but the wall store is only a metre tall and shiplap. The nice
    plastic ones are floor mounted and therefore no good. If anyone knows of a cheap wall mounted one
    let me know!
     
  8. "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain it with the rear (so I can turn the bars sideways
    > - if that makes sense?)

    Alternatively to poping off the front wheel you could loosen off the stem a bit and turn the bars
    sideways that way. I find poping off a wheel involves a bit more than releasing a QR (on mine it
    involves unscrewing the other side of the QR a few turns, releasing the cable from the brake
    calipers and lifting/juggling the bike to get the axle out). Loosening off a couple of bolts with an
    allen key could be quicker.

    Rich
     
  9. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    Richard Goodman wrote:
    > "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain it with the rear (so I can turn the bars sideways
    >> - if that makes sense?)
    >
    > Alternatively to poping off the front wheel you could loosen off the stem a bit and turn the bars
    > sideways that way. I find poping off a wheel involves a bit more than releasing a QR (on mine it
    > involves unscrewing the other side of the QR a few turns, releasing the cable from the brake
    > calipers and lifting/juggling the bike to get the axle out). Loosening off a couple of bolts with
    > an allen key could be quicker.
    >
    > Rich

    Good point. I tried floating the idea last night of hanging the bike on the kitchen wall - there is
    an 11' ceiling height after all and as you can imagine it's not being used. Lead and ballon are two
    words that may be used to describe the response..... Some people.
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Tenex wrote:
    > Richard Goodman wrote:
    >> "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>> I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain it with the rear (so I can turn the bars
    >>> sideways - if that makes sense?)
    >>
    >> Alternatively to poping off the front wheel you could loosen off the stem a bit and turn the bars
    >> sideways that way. I find poping off a wheel involves a bit more than releasing a QR (on mine it
    >> involves unscrewing the other side of the QR a few turns, releasing the cable from the brake
    >> calipers and lifting/juggling the bike to get the axle out). Loosening off a couple of bolts with
    >> an allen key could be quicker.
    >>
    >> Rich
    >
    > Good point. I tried floating the idea last night of hanging the bike on the kitchen wall - there
    > is an 11' ceiling height after all and as you can imagine it's not being used. Lead and ballon are
    > two words that may be used to describe the response..... Some people.

    Perhaps a winch, such as used in days of yore for washing lines indoors, may help get the bike above
    eye-line .. ;)

    Of course, there are various other uses for such a device, but that's maybe best left to the
    imagination .. ;)

    --

    Completed 1708 Seti work units in 12974 hours http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
     
  11. Tenex

    Tenex Guest

    > Perhaps a winch, such as used in days of yore for washing lines indoors, may help get the bike
    > above eye-line .. ;)

    No need I can reach ;-)

    ... and I'd be hanging it upside down so no doubt the bars would get used for hanging
    something else.....
     
  12. Ian D

    Ian D Guest

    "Richard Goodman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Tenex" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I expect I'll pop off the front wheel and chain it with the rear (so I can turn the bars
    > > sideways - if that makes sense?)
    >
    > Alternatively to poping off the front wheel you could loosen off the stem
    a
    > bit and turn the bars sideways that way. I find poping off a wheel
    involves
    > a bit more than releasing a QR (on mine it involves unscrewing the other side of the QR a few
    > turns, releasing the cable from the brake calipers
    and
    > lifting/juggling the bike to get the axle out). Loosening off a couple of bolts with an allen key
    > could be quicker.
    >
    > Rich
    >
    I've fitted a couple of these for peeps who need to store bikes in a corridor: http://www.x-fix.nl/
    There is some English on the site if you look carefully and I got them to mail to me after an email
    and sending Euro notes. (My bank wanted more for the transfer than the cost of the part) Ian
     
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