DOMS vs. Injury

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Isiafs5, Feb 15, 2004.

  1. Isiafs5

    Isiafs5 Guest

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  2. Mjuric

    Mjuric Guest

    On 15 Feb 2004 18:26:24 GMT, [email protected] (Isiafs5) wrote:

    >Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from muscle/tendon injury?
    >
    >Sling Skate
    >
    >My recommended reading for body fat control: http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm

    An interesting question I'm sure I don't have an answer for, maybe someone else does. In my
    experiance it the differences are so minute that only time and experiances can really tell
    the differnece. Kinda like an artist can tell the differnece between what I'd call light
    green and well.... Light green. DOMS in my experinace has a slightly "dull" "achy" feeling.
    Also in my experinace this is generally accompinied by a general "fatigue". Movements are
    slow and hurt but continued motion have a tendancy of feeling a bit better not worse. OTOH
    an injury is usually a slighty "sharper" pain. Generally more specific in location. you'd
    probably say "It hurts when I push here" rather than "it hurts when I move this muscle". IOW
    DOMS, at least in my experiance, incorporates most of the muslce or muscle group were as an
    injury generally hurts in only a specific location of the muscle or tendon. Obviously if the
    pain is in the area of a tendon only, Achilles, PF, ITB then it's not DOMS but some
    irritation to the tendon. Obviously I'm not a doctor and this is only my experiance.
    Hopefully someone else with have a more "clinical" method.

    ~Matt
     
  3. Isiafs5

    Isiafs5 Guest

    >MJuric [email protected]
    >Date: 2/15/2004 4:45 PM Pacific Standar

    Thanks for the response. As any active person uh... matures this will become a more and more
    important question.

    You comments refect my experience with one exception. I find that in some tendon injuries that the
    pain is generalized or even telescopes for a day or two and then I can find the exact source. A good
    example of this is a back pain that nagged me. I massaged the area and didn't get the expected
    results. After a few days and by accident I discovered that the injured tendon was actually one of
    my obliques, on my side.

    Everytime this happens its a risk decision: dont' waste a training day versus making the injury
    worse and losing many more training days.

    Sling Skate

    My recommended reading for body fat control: http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm
     
  4. DOMS - generally dull pain, like the other poster said. Injury - generall sharp pain. Also, if the
    pain persists through another workout then it very well could be an injury.

    All it takes is a couple of overuse injuries, and you will be able to tell. Bob Pawlak (remove
    1et.tw to e-mail) Chess Assistance http://www.chessassistance.com Chess Reviews
    http://www.chessreviews.com
     
  5. Bill

    Bill Guest

    > Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from muscle/tendon injury?
    >
    > Sling Skate

    DOMS affects the entire muscle, and responds well to massage and light use?

    I do not generally get tendon pain when training, unless injured.

    If you risked warming up a DOMS-sore muscle and using it, you should be able to do so without
    symptoms. Though you could injure it by this test.
     
  6. Isiafs5 wrote:

    > Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from muscle/tendon injury?

    Four responses so far and I still don't know what DOMS stands for. -- Josh
     
  7. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "Josh Steinberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Isiafs5 wrote:
    >
    > > Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from muscle/tendon injury?
    >
    > Four responses so far and I still don't know what DOMS stands for. -- Josh

    Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It's a result of microscopic tearing (and also swelling, to a lesser
    extent) of muscle fibers.

    It's strange that a doctor wouldn't have come across this term before! Especially a doctor that runs
    regularly.

    cheers,
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  8. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

  9. SwStudio wrote:
    > "Josh Steinberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>Isiafs5 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from muscle/tendon injury?
    >>
    >>Four responses so far and I still don't know what DOMS stands for. -- Josh
    >
    >
    >
    > Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It's a result of microscopic tearing (and also swelling, to a
    > lesser extent) of muscle fibers.
    >
    > It's strange that a doctor wouldn't have come across this term before! Especially a doctor that
    > runs regularly.
    >
    >
    > cheers,

    Why? It seems like a pretty useless TLA to me, but sounds so much more scientific than "fatigue."

    Scott "Red" Ruffensore
     
  10. Swstudio

    Swstudio Guest

    "Scott Williams" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > SwStudio wrote:
    > > "Josh Steinberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >
    > >>Isiafs5 wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>Anyone have a good short term way to distinguish DOMS from
    muscle/tendon
    > >>>injury?
    > >>
    > >>Four responses so far and I still don't know what DOMS stands for. -- Josh
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It's a result of microscopic tearing (and also swelling, to a
    > > lesser extent) of muscle fibers.
    > >
    > > It's strange that a doctor wouldn't have come across this term before! Especially a doctor that
    > > runs regularly.
    > >
    > >
    > > cheers,
    >
    > Why? It seems like a pretty useless TLA to me, but sounds so much more scientific than "fatigue."
    >
    > Scott "Red" Ruffensore

    Scott, my comments that I found it suprising that a doctor would not have come across the term
    "DOMS" was not meant to be a way of saying, "I think DOMS is really important, 'need-to-know'
    phenomenon, and I think everyone should know about it".

    I could care less if it's important, real, fake, or some-thing in between. I merely was suprised
    that someone in his profession (and a long-time runner) hadn't come across it before. I see the term
    all the time.

    I see the National Enquirer every week at the supermarket checkout counter - but if you had never
    heard of that doesn't mean I believe the news written within, when I not my suprise at you not
    having come across it before.

    cheers,.
    --
    David (in Hamilton, ON) www.allfalldown.org
     
  11. Rick++

    Rick++ Guest

    > For me DOMS generally kicks in hard after around 40 hours.

    For me, its been approximately my age in years as hours. It takes longer as get older.
     
  12. SwStudio wrote:
    > Scott, my comments that I found it suprising that a doctor would not have come across the term
    > "DOMS" was not meant to be a way of saying, "I think DOMS is really important, 'need-to-know'
    > phenomenon, and I think everyone should know about it".

    David,

    I find your posts enjoyable and informative. I didn't put a smiley 'cause I gave myself a silly
    moniker at the end. I'm not really going to get wound up over an acronym.

    I use TLAs when I can't spell the real thing (e.g., VMO), but I get really tired of learning new
    ones. I already know DOM as Document Object Model, but what the hey.

    Peace and good running to you.

    Scott
     
  13. SwStudio wrote:

    > > Four responses so far and I still don't know what DOMS stands for. -- Josh
    >
    > Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness. It's a result of microscopic tearing (and also swelling, to a
    > lesser extent) of muscle fibers.
    >
    > It's strange that a doctor wouldn't have come across this term before!

    I know, surprising, but that's why I had to ask. -- josh
     
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