Don try this at home

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Bryan, Jun 12, 2003.

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  1. Bryan

    Bryan New Member

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    Did a stupid thignand went out running on Tuesday, and twisted my ankle quite badly. As I couldn't really walk very well thoguht I'd give riding to work a miss yesterday, however in typical macho mode decided to ride in this morning. That's when I found that riding through London with Look pedals and a dodgy ankle really isn't a good idea :) Why are there so many sets of traffic lights? why are the railings just that bit too far away for you to reach without risking a graceful sideways fall?

    Anyway here's hoping that after another day sitting at my desk that it will be better getting home tonight.

    Bryan
     
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  2. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Bryan deftly scribbled:

    > Did a stupid thignand went out running on Tuesday, and twisted my ankle quite badly. As I couldn't
    > really walk very well thoguht I'd give riding to work a miss yesterday, however in typical macho
    > mode decided to ride in this morning. That's when I found that riding through London with Look
    > pedals and a dodgy ankle really isn't a good idea :) Why are there so many sets of traffic
    > lights? why are the railings just that bit too far away for you to reach without risking a
    > graceful sideways fall?

    I also had to give up clipless pedals as I have two dodgy ankles, a knee that hyper - extends
    and the other knee 'pops' out sideways occasionally. The twisting, no matter how easy became
    just too painful.

    > Anyway here's hoping that after another day sitting at my desk that it will be better getting home
    > tonight.

    When mine are really bad I use a Tubi-Grip bandage for an hour or so, then rest, then the bandage
    again, then rest etc .. It does seem to work .. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Not me, someone else" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I also had to give up clipless pedals as I have two dodgy ankles, a knee that hyper - extends and
    > the other knee 'pops' out sideways occasionally. The twisting, no matter how easy became just too
    > painful. [...] When mine are really bad I use a Tubi-Grip bandage for an hour or so, then rest,
    > then the bandage again, then rest etc .. It does seem to work .. ;)

    The cure is there, but sadly it's not available on the NHS:

    http://www.ice.hpv.co.uk

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
     
  4. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I mashed my left knee into millions of pieces 5 years ago(motorbike versus WVM), had a lot of
    surgery, used to ride a recumbent anyway but tried a wedgie (conventional bike) and found the knee
    impact to great, bought a new recumbent, no problems with SPD's but at junctions when I stop, if I
    put my left foot down I fall over as the joint tries to slide apart, its not getting any better,
    only cure would be a new knee joint but nhs will not do it unless I'm totally crippled plus I'm too
    young apparently so might wear it out, then they would have to do it twice, they say its too
    expensive. B*st*rds, sorry. So I get to limp through life, funny thing is I can ride my bent all day
    but can only walk short distances, using a recumbent trike at the moment, very comfy but need a
    faster one.

    Ian

    > From: "Not me, someone else" <[email protected]> Reply-To: "Not me, someone else"
    > <[email protected]> Newsgroups: uk.rec.cycling Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2003 12:13:33 +0100
    > Subject: Re: Don try this at home

    > I also had to give up clipless pedals as I have two dodgy ankles, a knee that hyper - extends and
    > the other knee 'pops' out sideways occasionally. The twisting, no matter how easy became just too
    > painful.
    >
    > When mine are really bad I use a Tubi-Grip bandage for an hour or so, then rest, then the bandage
    > again, then rest etc .. It does seem to work .. ;)
    >
    > --
    > Digweed
     
  5. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? deftly scribbled:

    > "Not me, someone else" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> I also had to give up clipless pedals as I have two dodgy ankles, a knee that hyper - extends and
    >> the other knee 'pops' out sideways occasionally. The twisting, no matter how easy became just too
    >> painful. [...] When mine are really bad I use a Tubi-Grip bandage for an hour or so, then rest,
    >> then the bandage again, then rest etc .. It does seem to work .. ;)
    >
    > The cure is there, but sadly it's not available on the NHS:
    >
    > http://www.ice.hpv.co.uk

    Heheheh ... ;)

    I jest a little maybe, but they _do_ look inviting, and way too comfortable to be any good. Then I
    saw the prices, which is serious money for me .. My Bike cost £350 ish 10 years ago when it's list
    price was £750 (Dyna-Tech Cro Mo Comp, while I was working on Ti fasteners for Raleigh, they gave me
    a 'discount')

    --
    Digweed
     
  6. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > That's when I found that riding through London with Look pedals and a dodgy ankle really isn't a
    > good idea :) Why are there so many sets of traffic lights? why are the railings just that bit too
    > far away for you to reach without risking a graceful sideways fall?

    Could you not have put the good foot down?

    --
    Dave...
     
  7. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > > That's when I found that riding through London with Look pedals and a dodgy ankle really isn't a
    > > good idea :) Why are there so many sets of traffic lights? why are the railings just that bit
    > > too far away for you to reach without risking a graceful sideways fall?
    >
    > Could you not have put the good foot down?

    Then he would have to start pedalling with the bad leg though - and the first half rotation of the
    pedals on a recumbent can take a fair amount of effort if the gears aren't low enough.

    Mads
     
  8. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Ian deftly scribbled:

    > I mashed my left knee into millions of pieces 5 years ago(motorbike versus WVM), had a lot of
    > surgery, used to ride a recumbent anyway but tried a wedgie (conventional bike) and found the knee
    > impact to great, bought a new recumbent, no problems with SPD's but at junctions when I stop, if I
    > put my left foot down I fall over as the joint tries to slide apart, its not getting any better,
    > only cure would be a new knee joint but nhs will not do it unless I'm totally crippled plus I'm
    > too young apparently so might wear it out, then they would have to do it twice, they say its too
    > expensive. B*st*rds, sorry. So I get to limp through life, funny thing is I can ride my bent all
    > day but can only walk short distances, using a recumbent trike at the moment, very comfy but need
    > a faster one.

    My 'problems' are due to a motorcycle crash or two (while racing), the ankles were both dislocated
    twice (at least) while playing Hockey, and the hyper-extended knee was done while hopping over a 1'
    high wall .. the knee simply went the wrong way .. ;(

    The NHS said exactly the same to me .. get old and we'll consider it, get really crippled and we'll
    consider it, as it is you're too young (43) and too fit and able-bodied to qualify for surgery and
    joint replacement. Oh, the cruciate ligament is also not really doing anything and a couple of
    tendons are also sort of flapping about .. but that's OK, apparently, I can hobble better than the
    requirement for surgery .. And we can't afford private at the moment, the knee hyper extension only
    happened a couple of years ago.

    Actually I don't suffer while on the bike at all, it was only when I tried to release from toe
    straps and clipless pedals that I had problems. Now I use 'flatties' I'm OK. I also ride a ever so
    slightly short saddle height so that my leg and knee can't extend too far and lock, which is
    extremely embarassing, not to mention painful. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  9. Ian

    Ian Guest

    oh to be able to lock my left knee, alas it does not straighten out at all any more, we have such a
    good health service, just enough to keep you alive but not enough to live well.

    Ian

    >
    > My 'problems' are due to a motorcycle crash or two (while racing), the ankles were both dislocated
    > twice (at least) while playing Hockey, and the hyper-extended knee was done while hopping over a
    > 1' high wall .. the knee simply went the wrong way .. ;(
    >
    > The NHS said exactly the same to me .. get old and we'll consider it, get really crippled and
    > we'll consider it, as it is you're too young (43) and too fit and able-bodied to qualify for
    > surgery and joint replacement. Oh, the cruciate ligament is also not really doing anything and a
    > couple of tendons are also sort of flapping about .. but that's OK, apparently, I can hobble
    > better than the requirement for surgery .. And we can't afford private at the moment, the knee
    > hyper extension only happened a couple of years ago.
    >
    > Actually I don't suffer while on the bike at all, it was only when I tried to release from toe
    > straps and clipless pedals that I had problems. Now I use 'flatties' I'm OK. I also ride a ever so
    > slightly short saddle height so that my leg and knee can't extend too far and lock, which is
    > extremely embarassing, not to mention painful. ;)
    >
    > --
    > Digweed
     
  10. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I use the railings in Rochester for this, find my gearing fine. Unfortunately it is not always
    possible to use the good leg, and like you say then you have to start pedalling with the bad leg. It
    wouldn't be so bad but I think I fall into the category of semi-cripple, so I get most of the
    problems and none of the help. Got to laugh haven't you?

    Ian

    > From: "Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> Organization: TDC Internet Newsgroups:
    > uk.rec.cycling Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2003 15:37:43 +0200 Subject: Re: Don try this at home
    >
    >>> That's when I found that riding through London with Look pedals and a dodgy ankle really isn't a
    >>> good idea :) Why are there so many sets of traffic lights? why are the railings just that bit
    >>> too far away for you to reach without risking a graceful sideways fall?
    >>
    >> Could you not have put the good foot down?
    >
    > Then he would have to start pedalling with the bad leg though - and the first half rotation of the
    > pedals on a recumbent can take a fair amount of effort if the gears aren't low enough.
    >
    > Mads
     
  11. Mads Hilberg

    Mads Hilberg Guest

    > I use the railings in Rochester for this, find my gearing fine. Unfortunately it is not always
    > possible to use the good leg, and like you say then you have to start pedalling with the bad leg.
    > It wouldn't be so
    bad
    > but I think I fall into the category of semi-cripple, so I get most of the problems and none of
    > the help. Got to laugh haven't you?

    As Guy pointed out a trike is a great solution for people with this issue. Now if only someone would
    make a decent trike that was only marginally more expensive than a normal recumbent...

    Mads
     
  12. Ian

    Ian Guest

    I have a recumbent trike as well as the two wheeler, but am planning on selling both and getting a
    more race orientated machine.

    Ian

    > From: "Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> Organization: TDC Internet Newsgroups:
    > uk.rec.cycling Date: Thu, 12 Jun 2003 17:02:38 +0200 Subject: Re: Don try this at home
    >
    >> I use the railings in Rochester for this, find my gearing fine. Unfortunately it is not always
    >> possible to use the good leg, and like you say then you have to start pedalling with the bad leg.
    >> It wouldn't be so
    > bad
    >> but I think I fall into the category of semi-cripple, so I get most of the problems and none of
    >> the help. Got to laugh haven't you?
    >
    > As Guy pointed out a trike is a great solution for people with this issue. Now if only someone
    > would make a decent trike that was only marginally more expensive than a normal recumbent...
    >
    > Mads
     
  13. Not Me

    Not Me Guest

    Ian deftly scribbled:

    > oh to be able to lock my left knee, alas it does not straighten out at all any more, we have such
    > a good health service, just enough to keep you alive but not enough to live well.

    Unfortunately 'lock' is perhaps the wrong word .. I actually mean that my knee joint opens or bends
    the other way to normal, so not only can I straighten the leg out, but if it goes over (hyper
    extends) I can't actually get it back without resorting to using my hands .. or having something to
    kick .. which is a tad awkward on the bike, especially when about to negotiate a ring road
    roundabout .. ;)

    --
    Digweed
     
  14. Ian

    Ian Guest

    Yerk!

    yeah I knew what you meant, sorry I was being ironic. We can start the CCC, Cripples Cycling Club,
    wont need lolly sticks in the spokes to make the clicking noise, can rely on clacking joints
    instead, could be a goer.

    Ian

    > Unfortunately 'lock' is perhaps the wrong word .. I actually mean that my knee joint opens or
    > bends the other way to normal, so not only can I straighten the leg out, but if it goes over
    > (hyper extends) I can't actually get it back without resorting to using my hands .. or having
    > something to kick .. which is a tad awkward on the bike, especially when about to negotiate a ring
    > road roundabout .. ;)
    >
    > --
    > Digweed
     
  15. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > > Could you not have put the good foot down?
    >
    > Then he would have to start pedalling with the bad leg though - and the first half rotation of the
    > pedals on a recumbent can take a fair amount of effort if the gears aren't low enough.

    The OP did not mention a recumbent. From his post I assumed it was the twisting to release from the
    Look that was giving him gyp.

    --
    Dave...
     
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