Don't start out by buying a $5000 bike



Did you buy a new very expensive bike staight og

  • Yes, I did

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, I got a good secondhand bike before moving into a new, very expensive bike.

    Votes: 138 100.0%

  • Total voters
    138

Downhill Jonny

New Member
Jul 26, 2004
25
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sathomasga said:
My experience getting into cycling seriously. When I started, I found the least expensive road bike aournd (Giant OCR3). It was only after a couple of years of riding that I really understood that (a) I could care less about racing, (b) I really liked longish (60+ miles) rides Saturday morning, and (c) the roads here in North Georgia aren't always perfectly maintained, but they do have some hills. With that knowledge, it was much easier to find a new bike (Litespeed Tuscany) that fits my riding style: traditional rather than compact geometry for more relaxed position, titanium to smooth out the road bumps, and relatively light for the hills. If I'd dropped $3K in the beginning, I might have well ended up with a high end aluminum, compact frame, racing-oriented bike. I'm sure it would have been a fine bike, but it wouldn't have fit me.
I am seriously considering the Tuscany after having a look at the Vortex, Colnago CT2 and Merx Majestic Ti. How does the Tuscany compare?
 

oznation

New Member
Aug 20, 2004
100
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Feanor said:
You mean I can't pull a Tom Cruise and leap into my Nascar Stock car with no Nascar excperience and win Daytona? Damn...

*laughing*

Just kidding of course... I've only been road cycling for a few months (after years of mountain biking) and I think I would probably ride for a few years before racing formally in any kind of race... If even at all (cycling for me is more about personal fitness these days)

Oh what I wouldn't give to have been bitten by the cycling bug when I was 16!

Have a good one!

Feanor



well i should be glad that i have been "bitten" by the bug to ride im 17 and i have played soccer year round for as long as i can remember and now my senior year is almost over and i will need something to stay in shape with so i turned to riding and i love it.
 

Strykr

New Member
Aug 13, 2004
9
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Here is my experience.

I bought a Shwinn hybrid from Canadian Tire (I live in Sudbury, Ontario). I liked the bike however I found that I enjoyed trail riding. The bike from day one had a vibration in the front wheel when I would brake. I found out that was due to an un-true wheel. I brought the bike back and they told me that unless I wanted to pay them to fix it, I would have to go to my LBS.

I had purchased a bike some years ago at a local store here in my city. I went back to get the wheels on my Shwinn true'ed. I told him the story about the bike (which cost me 400$ CND) and he said that if I could bring it back, they would sell me a Trek 4300 for the same price. The bike looked pretty sweet and would be perfect for the trails. They cleaned my bike, did not charge me for the work they did on the wheels. I was able to return the bike and I got that 4300 and one for my wife.

I started to go out with some friends and they are all into some nice rides. One of which is a Specialized Big Hit Comp. The kind of trails we would do were pretty aggressive. Steap technical downhills and climbs as well as softer wet terrain full of stumps, roots and logs. Here in Sudbury things are very rocky, perfect for some serious gear. The 4300 was good as a starter bike, but having gotten back into cycling after a 4 year break, I got the hang of things pretty quick. I asked the guys at the shop what kind of bike I should get. They said that a FS all mountain would be perfect for the kind of riding I was planning to do. I took a look at some Specialized Epics, BH, several models from Kona. But the bike I fell in love with was a 2003 Trek Liquid 10. The moment I sat on that bike I fell in love. Ever since I go out everyday for 2 to 3 hours on our rocky trails, and I look forward to the end of day to get on that bike again. I love to look at it, clean it, I think about cycling almost every moment of the day. I'm by no means a pro yet, but I think if I keep this up, it won't take long at all.

The point of my little story is that great service, honesty from my LBS, and attention to my cycling style put a really good bike into my hands which I enjoy riding everyday.

...now if only I could sleep through winter until the start of the next MTB season... . . .
 

closesupport

Banned
Jul 18, 2004
1,064
0
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Strykr said:
...now if only I could sleep through winter until the start of the next MTB season... . . .
your fitness and ability would suffer then you would have to start over :) don't give up riding since winter is here! take it in doors. save the downhill tactics until next season by all means, just don't let your hard work go to waste, keep ontop of it and maintain your power and fitness.
 

p38lightning

New Member
Apr 19, 2004
418
4
18
Bowyer said:
Cycling is my life and these days down when I got out on sunday I see a lot of new riders with very expensive bikes. Now this is a big worry when they have just got into the sport because you never know they might not enjoy it and they might think that it is not for them (trust me it happens all the time). So i and many pro's and masters always say to people just getting into the sport to not just go to the local bike store and pick up a trek with dura-ace and carbon everything, go to web sites that sell secondhand bikes or if your lucky go and ask at a bikestore they have great bikes from $350-$1000 with 300km on them. it is so much more sensible than buying a $5000 bike straight of.

I agree with you. The good side of this is that in 5 years or so the ones who lose interest may put up for sale a Colnago or Pinerello for a fraction of what it was bought for, allowing some of us to come up with a "real steal" of a buy!
 

breakz

New Member
Sep 20, 2004
3
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0
I've just started cycling (no more than a month) on a Cannondale Silk Path 900 Hybrid bike. The bike is too big for me--my triceps are often sore after a ride (from having to reach across so much) and my hands are often in pain from keeping my elbows locked (again, reaching across so much)--but I'm in love with the sport. I have a lot of soccer experience (played from when I was 4 to about 16, I'm 18 now), but I'm a bit out of shape (5'6", 160 lbs.) and I could stand to drop my body fat a bit more, but the bike I have now is definitely not good material for the longer rides.

Here's my question, since this is an article about new bikes: what are some of the cheaper RR models that are actually race ready? I'm looking to spend about $800-$1K on a nice bike that I can enjoy for a while, but I want something in case I get into serious racing sometime soon. Any ideas?

Oh, and I guess I'm one of the people that found the site before getting their first road bike, eh? ;)
 

kuss

New Member
Sep 17, 2004
14
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I agree in theory and it worked out for me. But I was lucky that my dad is a real experienced cyclist and I was able to start out on some of his older frames, primarily a steel DeRosa. Most of us get into cycling because we know someone who loves it... maybe if you're lucky like me, you can fit one of their old bikes. They'll probably be more than happy to encourage you...
 

Lord Chambers

New Member
Sep 4, 2004
24
0
0
I'm this |-| close to getting a LeMond Poprad 2004 for my first bike. It'll be about $950 plus whatever accessories I get.
 

artmichalek

New Member
Sep 15, 2004
2,010
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breakz said:
I've just started cycling (no more than a month) on a Cannondale Silk Path 900 Hybrid bike. The bike is too big for me--my triceps are often sore after a ride (from having to reach across so much) and my hands are often in pain from keeping my elbows locked (again, reaching across so much)--but I'm in love with the sport. I have a lot of soccer experience (played from when I was 4 to about 16, I'm 18 now), but I'm a bit out of shape (5'6", 160 lbs.) and I could stand to drop my body fat a bit more, but the bike I have now is definitely not good material for the longer rides.

Here's my question, since this is an article about new bikes: what are some of the cheaper RR models that are actually race ready? I'm looking to spend about $800-$1K on a nice bike that I can enjoy for a while, but I want something in case I get into serious racing sometime soon. Any ideas?

Oh, and I guess I'm one of the people that found the site before getting their first road bike, eh? ;)
If you want to stick with Cannondale, the R500 is a good choice for that price range. The frame has a pretty short reach too.
 

BikeyGuy

New Member
Sep 27, 2003
182
0
16
70
Regardless what you buy always remember...SIZE.
Get the proper sized bike for you. Don't count on the LBS to size you. Do your homework. There are plenty of web sites that have a standard fit-kit on line. Get a good idea of your size. If the bike doesn't fit properly, you'll be uncomfortable and you just might lose interest in riding.
That would be alot worse than the amount you spend on your mount.
Safe cycling.
 

Eric007bike

New Member
Nov 2, 2004
9
0
0
62
I agree with the reply stating that no matter what the level of quality you buy, it will not influence whether or you'll enjoy cycling. Honestly, true cyclists will have just as much fun on the $300 bike as they will the $5000. It is about the activity, not how much money you can spend.I own several bikes ranging in value from $450 to $6500 and enjoy the ride on all of them.
 

Felt_Rider

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2004
3,257
54
48
I am not sure what classifies as expensive, but as a biking newbie since about May 2004 I have spent probably near $4K in bikes and gear.

In May I bought a Gary Fisher Tassajara (not expensive)
In August I bought a Felt F45 ( $2K with tax)

plus summer and winter clothing
I have spd's on the mt. bike and Look on the road bike and different shoes of course, pump, camelback, multi-tool, and the list goes on.

Why did I do all of this suddenly?
I started mt. biking in May because I had a neuroma in my right foot that created too much pain to run or hike, but I desired to keep in shape. So I thought I would try biking and then I absolutely fell in love with it. Biking consumes my thoughts now. As a former competitive bodybuilder I have no trouble staying consistent with training because I have been consistent for more than 20 non-stop years of training.

Now to the point of this thread, I am very glad I bought the Felt bike and all the gear even though I have only been biking for a few months. I have progessed quickly yet the bike is still ahead of my abilities. I can see buying a nice bike if you have the right attitude about fitness and the desire to stay in shape.
 

breakz

New Member
Sep 20, 2004
3
0
0
Well, its been about a month and a half since my post, and during that time I picked up a Specialized Allez Sport (the sexy international frame, too; God bless extra scholarship cash) to replace my old and faithful Cannondale (which was handed down to my brother, who will hopefully get bitten by the cycling bug too). I've been cranking out 30-mile rides now with a local club, and I must say that I absolutely love it. In fact, I just got back from doing stadiums, part of our offseason regimen.

I guess the point of my follow-up is that you can buy a $5K bike (well, an expensive one anyway) if you know yourself well enough and understand that you will continue to ride. I forced myself to stay away from the LBS and this bike until I knew that I was going to enjoy the sport. Now that I know I do, I can safely say that the purchase is worth it if you can. Besides, if you're into it, you're gonna want to upgrade eventually--so why not save the money for a better bike later?

Yeah, stadiums tend to erode my coherence a bit... :D
 

Induray

New Member
Sep 28, 2004
276
0
0
Hum? What's better? Owning a $5000 Bike and get blowned by a beater bike ....or owning a beater and blowing off several $5000 bikes.???
 

edd

New Member
Jul 8, 2003
594
0
0
Haven't heard the "cheap suite" argument yet ?

how many bikes was that again ?

On to my third bike now, after 30 odd years. yeah, and each was more expensive then the previous. If I had it over again, I don't think I'd blow 5K on my first, but I wouldn't go the cheapie either, I'd do some research and listen to what can be discerned as good advice, review the budget and.... well do it
 

closesupport

Banned
Jul 18, 2004
1,064
0
0
edd said:
Haven't heard the "cheap suite" argument yet ?

how many bikes was that again ?

On to my third bike now, after 30 odd years. yeah, and each was more expensive then the previous. If I had it over again, I don't think I'd blow 5K on my first, but I wouldn't go the cheapie either, I'd do some research and listen to what can be discerned as good advice, review the budget and.... well do it
review, here's my $2 if you want a good relatively cheep frame try purchasing from www.pedalforce.com i have the Ra 01 model and i love it to bits, it could have been alot more expensive than it worked out as.

I love it to bits, the frame doesn't generate the same amount of drag as that of a conventional frame so here in the UK even though its windy its still great to ride, but on calm days i find its still that little easier to ride than that of my conventional frame, but with carbon fork and monoque carbon frame its a long and comfortable ride that i love to do. Great bikes very good price, especially for full carbon frames.
 

Ian Wright

New Member
Jul 2, 2003
15
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0
Difficult question because most people can ride a bike in some form, maybe not in a technically efficient manner.

Pro's: The main one is that won't get burnt (money wise) if you lose interest.

Con's: These lie with the advantages of correct fitting etc. Result less chance of muscular injury. Honest LBS can give you contacts to improve skill.
:)
 

closesupport

Banned
Jul 18, 2004
1,064
0
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Ian Wright said:
Difficult question because most people can ride a bike in some form, maybe not in a technically efficient manner.

Pro's: The main one is that won't get burnt (money wise) if you lose interest.

Con's: These lie with the advantages of correct fitting etc. Result less chance of muscular injury. Honest LBS can give you contacts to improve skill.
:)
I built my own, i knew what frame size was most comfortable (59cm) i'm 5ft9" the frame was stated to be to large for me, but i find that by twisting my seat out 5% or so with aero bars i can get a very comfortable low profile, even when riding with scooped bars do i maintain somewhat a good comfortable position, not a position i would beable to achieve with a smaller frame.

plus making a substancial saving with complete DURA ACE GROUPO and mavic cosmic elite wheelset and tri bars for under £1000 hate to think what a shop would have charged me since they want over £700 for the dura ace alone.
 

MisterXTR

New Member
Apr 14, 2004
34
2
0
Like with anything else new, I approached serious bicycling with fiscal reserve; didn't make sense to me forking out huge piles of greenmeal to buy something that I might not enjoy. So I started with used frames and mid-level bikes until I figured out what I liked and didn't like. When I finally got an a clear feel for what I liked to ride, then I started spending money.

Now I've moved past buying out of the box and have started building my own. It's addictive!