Doping in US sports



J

Jack Hollis

Guest
On 28 Jun 2006 05:12:20 -0700, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Here's a piece I ran across this morning:
>http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=2501757
>Futility causes fatigue in drug-cheat chase
>By John Helyar
>ESPN.com
>Some good thought in there.
>Bill C



I've always wondered why soccer, which is certainly an endurance
sport, has had relatively few athletes testing positive compared to
many other sports. Have they been the one sport to keep clean or are
their testing procedures unable to pick up a lot of the more
sophisticated users?
 
G

Gabe Brovedani

Guest
Jack Hollis wrote:

>
> I've always wondered why soccer, which is certainly an endurance
> sport, has had relatively few athletes testing positive compared to
> many other sports. Have they been the one sport to keep clean or are
> their testing procedures unable to pick up a lot of the more
> sophisticated users?


The leagues and team owners are probably better at hiding the drug use.
Plus epo doesn't help with dribbling. However, soccer is not without
it's doping problem:

http://worldsoccer.about.com/b/a/128683.htm

And a quick google search reveals many articles on doped soccer stars.
Here's one:

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/sport/issues/story/0,,676764,00.html

Gabe Brovedani
 
T

Tuschinski

Guest
Jack Hollis wrote:
> On 28 Jun 2006 05:12:20 -0700, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>
> >Here's a piece I ran across this morning:
> >http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=2501757
> >Futility causes fatigue in drug-cheat chase
> >By John Helyar
> >ESPN.com
> >Some good thought in there.
> >Bill C

>
>
> I've always wondered why soccer, which is certainly an endurance
> sport, has had relatively few athletes testing positive compared to
> many other sports. Have they been the one sport to keep clean or are
> their testing procedures unable to pick up a lot of the more
> sophisticated users?


It's simply a lack of testing. Dope use in Soccer is probably
incredibly high. The signs are there, especially in Italy (some
semi-scandals and odd links to cycling doctors)

Ripping a tendon and then recovering in record time? Steroids and
Hormones.
Build up in the off season? Epo, Steroids.
Epo definitely helps better dribbling.... the player with the best
endurance can perform at the higher level for 90 minutes.
 
D

Donald Munro

Guest
Tuschinski wrote:
> It's simply a lack of testing. Dope use in Soccer is probably
> incredibly high. The signs are there, especially in Italy (some
> semi-scandals and odd links to cycling doctors)


Juventus's (the same team now accused of match fixing) team doctor was
jailed for systematic administration of epo although his later appeal was
successful as he was somewhat brighter than miller and disposed of all
the evidence.
http://www.ergogenics.org/voetbal3.html
Also:
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/sport/issues/story/0,,676764,00.html

And for the rbr department of conspiracy theories:
http://channels.netscape.com/news/story.jsp?idq=/ff/story/0030/20060627/1247353752.htm

> Ripping a tendon and then recovering in record time? Steroids and
> Hormones.


I wonder if rooney (or messi) have been tested.
 
R

RonSonic

Guest
On Wed, 28 Jun 2006 20:45:50 -0400, Jack Hollis <[email protected]> wrote:

>On 28 Jun 2006 05:12:20 -0700, "Bill C" <[email protected]>
>wrote:
>
>>Here's a piece I ran across this morning:
>>http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=2501757
>>Futility causes fatigue in drug-cheat chase
>>By John Helyar
>>ESPN.com
>>Some good thought in there.
>>Bill C

>
>
>I've always wondered why soccer, which is certainly an endurance
>sport, has had relatively few athletes testing positive compared to
>many other sports. Have they been the one sport to keep clean or are
>their testing procedures unable to pick up a lot of the more
>sophisticated users?


They just haven't allowed anyone to try to destroy the sport over it.

Ron
 
T

Tuschinski

Guest

> They just haven't allowed anyone to try to destroy the sport over it.
>
> Ron


Ahhh yes, the Anti-Dopers try to drestroy the sport.

What a sorry state of affairs that people as Hamilton, who are
deadhonest, are being exposed as frauds. What a sad day when Saiz, our
wellknown top-director sportiff, was being exposed as a drug pusher.
The Sport is much better of when these things are allowed, covered by
our love. It is a wonder that an upstanding club as Juventus, never
implicated in schandals was one of the Italian Football-teams that had
a structural doping program. The structure itself is pure, wich is
shown this year when Juve was, undoubtedly falsily, accused of cheating
on all levels.

So yeah, I laugh about your "They try to destroy the sport" . It
actually seems they are trying to safe the sport despite itself.
 
B

Bob Schwartz

Guest
Jack Hollis wrote:
> I've always wondered why soccer, which is certainly an endurance
> sport, has had relatively few athletes testing positive compared to
> many other sports. Have they been the one sport to keep clean or are
> their testing procedures unable to pick up a lot of the more
> sophisticated users?


Soccer is clean. So are tennis and basketball.

They use the same doping control methods as baseball used to.
They're very effective.

Bob Schwartz
 
C

Curtis L. Russell

Guest
On Thu, 29 Jun 2006 12:29:55 GMT, Bob Schwartz
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>They use the same doping control methods as baseball used to.
>They're very effective.


Very few false positives.

Curtis L. Russell
Odenton, MD (USA)
Just someone on two wheels...
 
B

Bill C

Guest
Curtis L. Russell wrote:
> On Thu, 29 Jun 2006 12:29:55 GMT, Bob Schwartz
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >
> >They use the same doping control methods as baseball used to.
> >They're very effective.

>
> Very few false positives.
>
> Curtis L. Russell
> Odenton, MD (USA)
> Just someone on two wheels...


One interesting thing I've been hearing and seeing in rumors on
baseball is that a lot of the more influential Hall of Famers are
lobbying anyone with a vote to block those implicated in the doping
messes until there is some resolution. If not they are talking about
walking out, or just skipping the induction ceremonies completely.
Looks like Dave Winfield is about the most ****** off.
Bill C
 
H

Howard Kveck

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Curtis L. Russell <[email protected]> wrote:

> On Thu, 29 Jun 2006 12:29:55 GMT, Bob Schwartz
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >
> >They use the same doping control methods as baseball used to.
> >They're very effective.

>
> Very few false positives.


That's a plus.

--
tanx,
Howard

Never take a tenant with a monkey.

remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
 

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