Double lacing

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Keven Ruf, Aug 28, 2003.

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  1. Keven Ruf

    Keven Ruf Guest

    I built a wheel with a Sturmy Archer three speed hub and a Sun Ringle rim with 40 spokes. While
    lacing it up, I did a four cross pattern because that's what was there before. I also "double-laced"
    the spokes, so it was a pattern of over, over, under, over. Should it have been over, over, over,
    under? And will that make a difference?

    The record of the wheel is not bad. I haul me at 170 pounds, my son at 35 pounds, and about 35
    pounds of bike (it's an old Raleigh with child seat and panniers). I have broken a couple spokes,
    but those were in the beginning and I re-tentioned everything after that and have ridden a good
    thousand miles since with no need to true the wheel or replace a spoke.

    Is that pattern stronger, weaker, indifferent?

    --Keven.
     
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  2. Jobst Brandt

    Jobst Brandt Guest

    Keven Ruf writes:

    > I built a wheel with a Sturmey Archer three speed hub and a Sun Ringle rim with 40 spokes. While
    > lacing it up, I did a four cross pattern because that's what was there before. I also
    > "double-laced" the spokes, so it was a pattern of over, over, under, over. Should it have been
    > over, over, over, under? And will that make a difference?

    That process puts some bad bends in the spokes at the first crossing, ones that are not easy to
    properly align. Besides, the spokes act like springs when they have that much bend in them and they
    are not good at flexing and holding high tension at the same time.

    Don't do that!

    > The record of the wheel is not bad. I haul me at 170 pounds, my son at 35 pounds, and about 35
    > pounds of bike (it's an old Raleigh with child seat and panniers). I have broken a couple spokes,
    > but those were in the beginning and I re-tentioned everything after that and have ridden a good
    > thousand miles since with no need to true the wheel or replace a spoke.

    What do you mean re-tensioned. Weren't they tensioned when you first finished the wheels? I can't
    tell how you decided how tight to make these spokes but it sounds doubtful that they are tight
    enough regardless of your estimate of load carrying. Besides, Sturmey Archer hubs have flanges that
    are too thin for the elbows of most spokes. I think you will have some spoke failures at the elbows.

    > Is that pattern stronger, weaker, indifferent?

    Not good.

    Jobst Brandt [email protected] Palo Alto CA
     
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