Double-sided Shimano 323?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Victor Meldrew, May 17, 2003.

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  1. Is there a double-sided equivalent to the old 323 (SPD one side and flat cage t'other)? I bought the
    323's to get used to clipless and think they're wonderful. I'm now confident enough to stay clipped
    in all the time so the cage side is now a hinderance. However, the adjustment is still backed off to
    maximum. I can see no reason to make them any tighter. I have never pulled out unintentionally on a
    climb but can snatch my foot out on the odd occasion I forget I'm still clipped in. So the new
    pedals must have the same level of adjustment (and float).

    Thanks.
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    Paul Flackett

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  2. In message <[email protected]>, Victor Meldrew
    <[email protected]_bra.demon.co.uk> writes
    >Is there a double-sided equivalent to the old 323 (SPD one side and flat cage t'other)? I bought
    >the 323's to get used to clipless and think they're wonderful. I'm now confident enough to stay
    >clipped in all the time so the cage side is now a hinderance. However, the adjustment is still
    >backed off to maximum. I can see no reason to make them any tighter. I have never pulled out
    >unintentionally on a climb but can snatch my foot out on the odd occasion I forget I'm still
    >clipped in. So the new pedals must have the same level of adjustment (and float).
    >
    >Thanks.

    There are caged ones out there, I used to use the Shimano M545 ones, which has a metal cage around
    the cleat mechanism. However the cage is not really suitable for riding on without cleats for any
    length of time as the cleat retention mechanism protrudes above the cage (it must do, or it couldn't
    clip around the recessed cleat in the shoe!). Personally I like the cage, it stabilises your foot a
    bit better on the pedal and makes dabbing on and off the pedal easier, as you don't have to clip in
    right away.

    As far as the retention adjustment, if you're not pulling out of the pedal, why worry about it! :)

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    Thomas Letherby Remove NOSPAM to reply.
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Victor Meldrew wrote:
    > However, the adjustment is still backed off to maximum. I can see no reason to make them any
    > tighter. I have never pulled out unintentionally on a climb but can snatch my foot out on the odd
    > occasion I forget I'm still clipped in.

    In my experience with SPD's, they unintentionally pulled out when spinning seated along the flat,
    not on climbs, after the cleats had worn out a bit. So I think it would be wise to either increase
    the tension or make sure cleats are replaced regularly.

    ~PB
     
  4. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    In news:[email protected], Victor Meldrew <[email protected]_bra.demon.co.uk> typed:
    > Is there a double-sided equivalent to the old 323 (SPD one side and flat cage t'other)? I bought
    > the 323's to get used to clipless and think they're wonderful. I'm now confident enough to stay
    > clipped in all the time so the cage side is now a hinderance. However, the adjustment is still
    > backed off to maximum. I can see no reason to make them any tighter. I have never pulled out
    > unintentionally on a climb but can snatch my foot out on the odd occasion I forget I'm still
    > clipped in. So the new pedals must have the same level of adjustment (and float).
    >

    There are three models, the 424, the 545 and the 646 which are double sided with cages. Personally I
    would go straight for the 536 without the cage. I find them pretty easy to pedal on without clipping
    in whereas on the previous three models the cage tends to hold onto the sole of the shoe making
    clipping out a bit more difficult. They are quite different to the
    323/4's in that respect.

    Tony

    --
    http://www.raven-family.com

    "All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
    Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
     
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