Down-tube to STI shifter conversion



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Z

Zilla

Guest
Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
- How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
- How expensive?

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K

Ken

Guest
"Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in news:tKjla.43951$u81.35816 @fe05.atl2.webusenet.com:

> Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> - How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> - How expensive?

Any bicycle repair book will have detailed instructions, so I won't reproduce them here. Cost will
be $100 to $200 for a set of STI levers, depending on quality level. Add maybe $20 for a new set of
cables and housing and $10 for new handlebar tape.

You might also consider bar end shifters, which will cost about $50 plus cables and tape.
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
>
>
>Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
>- How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
>- How expensive?

Yes, the conversion is worth doing. Difficulty depends on your experience working on a bike. You
need to be able to tape bars, run new derailleur cables and housing, adjust your brakes, and adjust
your derailleurs. I thought it was pretty easy. Cost will depend on what is on your bike now. If
your current setup is the same speed as the STI levers, then the cost is just the levers, they
should come with cable and housing. Basically you untake your bars and remove your old brake levers,
you can re-use the brake cables and housing if they are in good condition. You then install the new
STI levers and brake cables and housing. At this point you can re-tape your bars. You then measure
and cut the STI housing to go from the levers to where you down tube levers are mounted. You then
remove your downtube levers and replace them with the cable stops that should have come with your
STI levers. Then you run the cables to your derailleurs. You can now test the set up and make the
necessary adjustments. Total time should be under 2 hours.
-----------------
Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
 
Z

Zilla

Guest
Thanks for the tip/encouragement folks!

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"Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> - How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> - How expensive?
>
> --
> - Zilla (Remove XSPAM)
>
 
G

Grenouil

Guest
"Ken" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> "Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in
news:tKjla.43951$u81.35816
> @fe05.atl2.webusenet.com:
>
> > Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> > - How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> > - How expensive?
>
> Any bicycle repair book will have detailed instructions,
so I won't reproduce
> them here. Cost will be $100 to $200 for a set of STI
levers, depending on
> quality level. Add maybe $20 for a new set of cables and
housing and $10 for
> new handlebar tape.
>
> You might also consider bar end shifters, which will cost
about $50 plus
> cables and tape.

If you buy new Shimano STI levers, the shifter/brake cables/housing and stops should be included.
All 'new' - as in bought in a store - Shimano STI is nine speed though these days, with the
exception of Sora. Alternatively you can find seven and eight speed STI shifters either new or used
on eBay or rec.bicycles,marketplace. What dérailleurs/cassette/crankset do you have though?

And if you're careful, you may be able to re-use your current bar tape.....
 
P

Paul Kopit

Guest
I know you can get Mirage Ergo shifters complete with cables and the requisite rear derailleur for
<$125. I can tell you where they are avaialble. You can use 8 of 9 cogs on a 7sp Shimano hub with
either 9sp STI or Ergo. You need a cassette and chain too.

When you go for brifters, you get new brake levers too.
 
J

J. Price

Guest
Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> >
> >
> >Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> >- How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> >- How expensive?
>
> Yes, the conversion is worth doing. Difficulty depends on your experience working on a bike. You
> need to be able to tape bars, run new derailleur cables and housing, adjust your brakes, and
> adjust your derailleurs. I thought it was pretty easy. Cost will depend on what is on your bike
> now. If your current setup is the same speed as the STI levers, then the cost is just the levers,
> they should come with cable and housing. Basically you untake your bars and remove your old brake
> levers, you can re-use the brake cables and housing if they are in good condition. You then
> install the new STI levers and brake cables and housing. At this point you can re-tape your bars.
> You then measure and cut the STI housing to go from the levers to where you down tube levers are
> mounted. You then remove your downtube levers and replace them with the cable stops that should
> have come with your STI levers. Then you run the cables to your derailleurs. You can now test the
> set up and make the necessary adjustments. Total time should be under 2 hours.
> -----------------
> Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)

....................It can be done on almost any bike. Whether it's worth it or not depends of the
bike and what else has to be changed. The new shifters have to be compatible with the rest of the
drivetrain,and it friction that means lots or other parts. The front derailer may not be STI
compatible depending on vintage even if the rest of the drivetrain is index. There are also frames
that used clamp on shifters rather than bosses.....The poster provided insufficient into to answer
other than.... 'it can probably be done,but.'
 
R

Richard Chan

Guest
> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> >
> >Is the above conversion worth doing? If so- How difficult? What steps are involved? > (Some steps
> >are obvious, but humor me) >- How expensive?

It is not difficult at all. Just some common sense. Basically it requires you to turn the knob to
center the chain and you are done. Depending how resourceful you are, buying used stuff can be very
rewarding. I would suggest go as high a level as you can afford. Don't forget to get a new chain,
original Shimano of course. To summarize, you will need STI shifters, cassette (may be new rear hub
if not compatible) and a new chain. Write back for details when you are ready.

Don't forget you can get 9 speeds downtube SIS shifting for DIRT CHEAP even at the Dura Ace level.
Another approach is to buy a new complete STI bike, strip the parts and sell that frame.
 
O

One Of The Six

Guest
"Zilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> - How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> - How expensive?
>

Easy to do. Fairly expensive (to me at least). I find them invaluable for two conditions and
completely unneccesary in all others. They really help when going over 30 mph on twisty bumpy roads,
and they really help on fast paced group training rides. If you do either of these then you'll not
understand how you could have gone without them. If you don't then to me it would be a waste of time
and money. I have two bikes with downtube shifters, one with Ergo levers. I ride them all, and like
the downtube shifters.
 
M

M Gagnon

Guest
"Grenouil" <[email protected]> a écrit dans le message de news: ....
> If you buy new Shimano STI levers, the shifter/brake cables/housing and stops should be included.
> All 'new' - as in bought in a store - Shimano STI is nine speed though these days, with the
> exception of Sora. Alternatively you can find seven and eight speed STI shifters either new or
> used on eBay or rec.bicycles,marketplace. What dérailleurs/cassette/crankset do you have though?

If you buy 9-speed STI, there is a way to use them with 8 or 7-speed cassette by running the cable
on the other side of the screw on the derailleur. Instructions are somewhere on
http://www.shimano-europe.com . Using 9-speed levers means you would be ready for a 9-speed cassette
or for 8-speed on 7 when the time comes to change the cassette. Alternatively, you might be able to
find cheap used 8-speed levers from someone who just upgraded.

Another consideration: brakes. If you have v-brakes, you will need an adaptor such as the Travel
Agent (there are 2-3 competing designs). They run at $15-20 per brake. If you have cantis, you are
OK, although you might need to readjust cable geometry.

Regards,

Michel Gagnon
 
Z

Zilla

Guest
The bike in question is a 1996 Trek 1200.

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"J. Price" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Alex Rodriguez <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:<[email protected]>...
> > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
> > >
> > >
> > >Is the above conversion worth doing? If so
> > >- How difficult? What steps are involved? (Some steps are obvious, but humor me)
> > >- How expensive?
> >
> > Yes, the conversion is worth doing. Difficulty depends on your
experience
> > working on a bike. You need to be able to tape bars, run new derailleur
cables
> > and housing, adjust your brakes, and adjust your derailleurs. I thought
it was
> > pretty easy. Cost will depend on what is on your bike now. If your
current
> > setup is the same speed as the STI levers, then the cost is just the
levers,
> > they should come with cable and housing. Basically you untake your bars
and
> > remove your old brake levers, you can re-use the brake cables and
housing if
> > they are in good condition. You then install the new STI levers and
brake
> > cables and housing. At this point you can re-tape your bars. You then
measure
> > and cut the STI housing to go from the levers to where you down tube
levers are
> > mounted. You then remove your downtube levers and replace them with the
cable
> > stops that should have come with your STI levers. Then you run the
cables to
> > your derailleurs. You can now test the set up and make the necessary adjustments. Total time
> > should be under 2 hours.
> > -----------------
> > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
>
> ....................It can be done on almost any bike. Whether it's worth it or not depends of the
> bike and what else has to be changed. The new shifters have to be compatible with the rest of the
> drivetrain,and it friction that means lots or other parts. The front derailer may not be STI
> compatible depending on vintage even if the rest of the drivetrain is index. There are also frames
> that used clamp on shifters rather than bosses.....The poster provided insufficient into to answer
> other than.... 'it can probably be done,but.'
 
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