Drenching sweats



L

Limey

Guest
My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching sweats, necessitating a
complete change of clothes. These happen in both the day and night. Our internist has made no
comment when told.

Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If so, where can he
turn for help?

I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA

Dora [email protected]

limey at toad dot net
 
M

Mack

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:27:54 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>
>My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching sweats, necessitating a
>complete change of clothes. These happen in both the day and night. Our internist has made no
>comment when told.
>
>Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If so, where can he turn
>for help?
>
>I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA
>
>Dora [email protected]
>
>limey at toad dot net
>

if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood sugar levels. do you test his
blood sugar at home? and especially when this occurs?

Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org

In tribute to the United States of America and the State of Israel, two bastions of strength in a
world filled with strife and terrorism.
 
L

Limey

Guest
"Mack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:27:54 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching
sweats,
> >necessitating a complete change of clothes. These happen in both the day and night. Our internist
> >has made no comment when told.
> >
> >Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If
so,
> >where can he turn for help?
> >
> >I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA
> >
> >Dora [email protected]
> >
> >limey at toad dot net
> >
>
> if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood sugar levels. do you test
> his blood sugar at home? and especially when this occurs?
>
> Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org

Good point. He doesn't test his blood sugar when these events happen - I'll tell him to make sure he
does. His blood sugar varies - runs mostly near 200 but often drops to 60 or 70. In other words, it
yo-yo's. The doctor has no explanation for that, either. Looks like he needs another doctor?

Dora
 
C

Cheri

Guest
Personally, it used to happen to me quite often when I was running high,
but I don't have much experience with lows at all. :)

--
Cheri
Type 2, no meds for now.

Mack wrote in message ...

>if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood
>sugar levels. do you test his blood sugar at home? and especially
>when this occurs?
>
>Mack
>Type 1 since 1975
>http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org
>http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
>
> In tribute to the United States of America and the State
> of Israel, two bastions of strength in a world filled with strife and
> terrorism.
 
G

Guy

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:33:10 -0800, "Cheri"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>Personally, it used to happen to me quite often when I was running high, but I don't have much
>experience with lows at all. :)

When I have a severe hypo my clothes and the bed is soaked. It is when I am very low. I think you
need an explanation. A good question is how does he recover and how does he feel then. The other
replies are on target. It is the docs responsibility to make changes to avoid this as much as
possible. Guy
 
A

Alan

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:59:04 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]> wrote:

>> if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood sugar levels. do you test
>> his blood sugar at home? and especially when this occurs?
>>
>> Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
>
>Good point. He doesn't test his blood sugar when these events happen - I'll tell him to make sure
>he does. His blood sugar varies - runs mostly near 200 but often drops to 60 or 70. In other words,
>it yo-yo's. The doctor has no explanation for that, either. Looks like he needs another doctor?
>
>Dora
>

Limey, is he Type 1 or Type 2?

If he's a type 2, "mostly near 200" would be concerning me. Sounds like a roller-coaster. What is
his HbA1c?

I ask because his control does not sound good, and improved control could improve lots of things,
including lows and night sweats. If he's Type 1, forget I wrote.

Cheers Alan, T2, Oz. dx May 2002 , A1C 5.8, no meds, diet and not enough exercise. I have no medical
qualifications beyond my own experience. Choose your advisers carefully, because experience can be
an expensive teacher.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
 
B

Bay Area Dave

Guest
how low are your severe hypos? I can go down into the 40's and not sweat a drop. Many, many years
ago I used to plummet into near unconsciousness and I'd sweat then. Certainly haven't had a
"sweating" hypo in the past 8 years on a pump, but I do get "low". Mostly I get weak, get
speckled "blue" vision, and tremble a little. On MDI, I used to shake like a leaf because the
lows came on so fast.

dave

Guy wrote:

> On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 16:33:10 -0800, "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>Personally, it used to happen to me quite often when I was running high, but I don't have much
>>experience with lows at all. :)
>
>
> When I have a severe hypo my clothes and the bed is soaked. It is when I am very low. I think you
> need an explanation. A good question is how does he recover and how does he feel then. The other
> replies are on target. It is the docs responsibility to make changes to avoid this as much as
> possible. Guy
 
M

Matt Weber

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:27:54 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>
>My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching sweats, necessitating a
>complete change of clothes. These happen in both the day and night. Our internist has made no
>comment when told.
>
>Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If so, where can he turn
>for help?
Endicronologist or neurologist. It is called Gustatory Sweating, and presumptive evidence of
autonomic Neuropathy.
>
>I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA
>
>Dora [email protected]
>
>limey at toad dot net
 
M

Mack

Guest
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:59:04 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Good point. He doesn't test his blood sugar when these events happen - I'll tell him to make sure
>he does. His blood sugar varies - runs mostly near 200 but often drops to 60 or 70. In other words,
>it yo-yo's. The doctor has no explanation for that, either. Looks like he needs another doctor?
>
>Dora
>

if his BG is dropping from the 200s(way to high) to the 60s and 70s rapidly that would trigger the
sweats just as easily as if he dropped slowly into the 60s or lower. as to the need of a new doctor,
does your husband test his BG on a regular basis, record exactly what and how much he eats and what
type and duration of exercise he gets? This data will allow a good doctor to help him correct the
problem. If he presents the doctor with all the facts and data and the doctor still says "I don't
know", "I'd" be looking for a new doctor.

Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org

In tribute to the United States of America and the State of Israel, two bastions of strength in a
world filled with strife and terrorism.
 
S

Stephanie Kolba

Guest
Limey, As most of the posters have said, the drenching sweats could be caused by going low. (Or,
going from high to normal very rapidly. That kind of swing will sometimes mimic hypo symptoms.) He
really needs to test his sugars when he has an episode. Some other hypo symptoms I have gotten are:
shakes, sweat, problems thinking and speaking, blue dots before my eyes, metallic taste in my mouth,
and just being "out of it." I think the sweats are the worst of the lot. It's awful when the clothes
and especially the bed clothes get drenched. It takes forever to warm back up!

As for Cheri, who said that she sweats when she runs high, I've never heard that. I wonder what
mechanism is triggered when she goes high?? (Real question.)

I hope that your husband will look into going to an endocrinologist. There has got to be an
explanation for his sweats. Keeping and log and testing his sugars during one of these episodes will
help ya'll to figure out what is going on.

Good luck. Steph

"limey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
> My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching
sweats,
> necessitating a complete change of clothes. These happen in both the day and night. Our internist
> has made no comment when told.
>
> Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If
so,
> where can he turn for help?
>
> I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA
>
> Dora [email protected]
>
> limey at toad dot net
 
J

Jennifer

Guest
Diabetic sweating is not just from hypos.

It can also be from running highs.

It is a form of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

This from NIH: http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/neuropathies/

"Sweat Glands

Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control sweating. When nerve damage prevents the
sweat glands from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature properly. Nerve damage
can also cause profuse sweating at night or while eating."

Jennifer

Stephanie Kolban wrote:

> Limey, As most of the posters have said, the drenching sweats could be caused by going low. (Or,
> going from high to normal very rapidly. That kind of swing will sometimes mimic hypo symptoms.) He
> really needs to test his sugars when he has an episode. Some other hypo symptoms I have gotten
> are: shakes, sweat, problems thinking and speaking, blue dots before my eyes, metallic taste in my
> mouth, and just being "out of it." I think the sweats are the worst of the lot. It's awful when
> the clothes and especially the bed clothes get drenched. It takes forever to warm back up!
>
> As for Cheri, who said that she sweats when she runs high, I've never heard that. I wonder what
> mechanism is triggered when she goes high?? (Real question.)
>
> I hope that your husband will look into going to an endocrinologist. There has got to be an
> explanation for his sweats. Keeping and log and testing his sugars during one of these episodes
> will help ya'll to figure out what is going on.
>
> Good luck. Steph
 
S

Stephanie Kolba

Guest
Thanks for the info. I was hoping someone would have an answer. Steph

"Jennifer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
berlin.de...
> Diabetic sweating is not just from hypos.
>
> It can also be from running highs.
>
> It is a form of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.
>
> This from NIH: http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/neuropathies/
>
> "Sweat Glands
>
> Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control sweating. When nerve damage prevents the
> sweat glands from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature properly. Nerve
> damage can also cause profuse sweating at night or while eating."
>
> Jennifer
>
>
>
> Stephanie Kolban wrote:
>
> > Limey, As most of the posters have said, the drenching sweats could be caused
by
> > going low. (Or, going from high to normal very rapidly. That kind of
swing
> > will sometimes mimic hypo symptoms.) He really needs to test his sugars when he has an episode.
> > Some other hypo symptoms I have gotten are:
shakes,
> > sweat, problems thinking and speaking, blue dots before my eyes,
metallic
> > taste in my mouth, and just being "out of it." I think the sweats are
the
> > worst of the lot. It's awful when the clothes and especially the bed clothes get drenched. It
> > takes forever to warm back up!
> >
> > As for Cheri, who said that she sweats when she runs high, I've never
heard
> > that. I wonder what mechanism is triggered when she goes high?? (Real question.)
> >
> > I hope that your husband will look into going to an endocrinologist.
There
> > has got to be an explanation for his sweats. Keeping and log and
testing
> > his sugars during one of these episodes will help ya'll to figure out
what
> > is going on.
> >
> > Good luck. Steph
 
C

Cheri

Guest
I don't know, but that happened a lot when I would be over 300 in the old days. Head and hair
soaking wet waking up covered in sweat etc. It could have been a combination of high BG's and
menopause, but now that I have good control it doesn't happen. Maybe a coincidence that they both
ended at the same time as far as drenching sweat goes? Still, when I do spike, I break out in a
sweat around the face area, even when I'm sitting. Dunno why.

--
Cheri
Type 2, no meds for now.

Guy wrote in message <[email protected]>...

>When I have a severe hypo my clothes and the bed
>is soaked. It is when I am very low. I think you
>need an explanation. A good question is how does
>he recover and how does he feel then. The other
>replies are on target. It is the docs responsibility to
>make changes to avoid this as much as possible.
> Guy
 
G

Guy

Guest
The important thing about our post is that all diabetics are not the same. That is why I like to be
here and compare notes. That is why I like to read the posts from many. In my opinion, ther are
several conditions we call diabetes, all resulting some loss of glucose control. It is not a simple
condition. Guy

On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 10:24:57 -0800, "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I don't know, but that happened a lot when I would be over 300 in the old days. Head and hair
>soaking wet waking up covered in sweat etc. It could have been a combination of high BG's and
>menopause, but now that I have good control it doesn't happen. Maybe a coincidence that they both
>ended at the same time as far as drenching sweat goes? Still, when I do spike, I break out in a
>sweat around the face area, even when I'm sitting. Dunno why.
 
L

Limey

Guest
"Jennifer" <[email protected]> wrote in message

> Diabetic sweating is not just from hypos.
>
> It can also be from running highs.
>
> It is a form of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.
>
> This from NIH: http://diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/dm/pubs/neuropathies/
>
> "Sweat Glands
>
> Autonomic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control sweating. When nerve damage prevents the
> sweat glands from working properly, the body cannot regulate its temperature properly. Nerve
> damage can also cause profuse sweating at night or while eating."
>
> Jennifer

Many thanks, Jennifer, for the reference to the NIH publication. It was really informative. I know
how distressful it is to my husband and how frustrating it is to get no help from the doctor.

Dora
 
B

Beav

Guest
"limey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Mack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> > On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 18:27:54 -0500, "limey" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >
> > >My husband is diabetic and frequently suffers from really drenching
> sweats,
> > >necessitating a complete change of clothes. These happen in both the
day
> > >and night. Our internist has made no comment when told.
> > >
> > >Someone mentioned that these are caused by diabetes. Is this true? If
> so,
> > >where can he turn for help?
> > >
> > >I would greatly appreciate any comments. TIA
> > >
> > >Dora [email protected]
> > >
> > >limey at toad dot net
> > >
> >
> > if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood sugar levels. do you test
> > his blood sugar at home? and especially when this occurs?
> >
> > Mack Type 1 since 1975 http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org http://www.insulin-pumpers.org
>
> Good point. He doesn't test his blood sugar when these events happen -
I'll
> tell him to make sure he does. His blood sugar varies - runs mostly near 200 but often drops to 60
> or 70. In other words, it yo-yo's. The doctor has no explanation for that, either. Looks like he
> needs another doctor?

Looks more like he needs to take a "little" more responsibility for his condition and start making
sure he's in control of his blood sugar levels.. At least to me it does.

Running mostly near 200 is almost a guarantee that he'll be racking up a whole slew of complications
later on in life, and he's obviously not eating as he should or testing like diabetics require if
they're to gain SOME control.

Sorry to be so blunt, but it looks like he (and you) are about to foist his problem off onto another
doctor instead of accepting that the problem is discipline at home.

Beav
 
L

Limey

Guest
I really appreciate everyone's comments and helpful suggestions, since I know how distressing this
is to my husband. He describes it as a "melt down". Thank you, everyone.

Dora
 
B

BMoss69893

Guest
>if it is caused by the diabetes it most likely be caused by low blood sugar levels. do you test his
>blood sugar at home? and especially when this occurs?
>
>Mack

Thank you for the advice. This also happens to me and I have not tested. Will do so. Betty.