Dressing for 32-40F With Wind



I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
 
P

Pyrtwist

Guest
There is a great variation in temp between 32 and 45 F. You need to
experiment with your layers. I just finished a 20 minute ride at 34 F.

At the high end of this range I would wear a Jersey for base layer
Long sleve jersey for the second layer.
Light breathable wind break/jacket for outer shell,
Thin pair of tights.
Head band that covers ears.
Pair of those $1 brown gloves

Closer to 32 F I would add a baclava. Possibly my Pearl Izumi winter full
finger gloves but the cheap gloves may suffice as they did tonight.

The thing to remember that as long as you are riding you generate heat and
warmth. If you stop you will cool down. If you have a rack you can carry
extra clothing or eliminate layers not needed.
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>


That's an easy range of temps -- as long as it's dry weather... Wet
conditions at those temps are about the hardest environment to dress for.

For dry weather, the biggest problem is sweat venting. Your clothes must
allow moisture to escape, otherwise it will build up over the hours.

There's a big difference in the amount of insulation you need when
pedaling vs. sitting still, so you need to carry that extra in case of
breakdown.

If I rode that much daily in those temps, I think skin chapping would be
an issue.
 
A

araby

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>

I find that feet and ears are the limiting criteria. Zip on overshoes and
balaclava are good. Next to the body Polypropoline (sp?)or equivalent next
to the skin followed by a wool or equiv. layer and a breathable wind breaker
on top. My gloves are Louis Garneau two fingered "lobster" style. This
ensemble is good to several degrees below freezing although I agree that the
effect of wind chill is a factor too
Cheers,

Roy
 
J

John Everett

Guest
On Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:38:54 -0500, "araby" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
><[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>>I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
>> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
>> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
>> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>>

>I find that feet and ears are the limiting criteria. Zip on overshoes and
>balaclava are good. Next to the body Polypropoline (sp?)or equivalent next
>to the skin followed by a wool or equiv. layer and a breathable wind breaker
>on top. My gloves are Louis Garneau two fingered "lobster" style. This
>ensemble is good to several degrees below freezing although I agree that the
>effect of wind chill is a factor too


I'm not sure I agree with the wind chill comment. After all, we create
our own wind chill. If we're riding on an absolutely calm day we're
still going to experience a (your speed here) mph effective wind. Feet
get it even worse, since they're constantly thrashing around in the
cold air.

There's a HUGE difference between riding into a 15 mph wind and riding
with the same wind at our back. I generally plan my rides so that I'm
coming home with the wind at my back. It's then that I'm unzipping
windbreakers and/or taking off balaclavas, full fingered gloves, etc.;
but I've never noticed that it has any effect on how my feet feel.



jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
 
S

SlowRider

Guest
Pyrtwist wrote:
> There is a great variation in temp between 32 and 45 F. You need to
> experiment with your layers. I just finished a 20 minute ride at 34 F.
>
> At the high end of this range I would wear a Jersey for base layer
> Long sleve jersey for the second layer.
> Light breathable wind break/jacket for outer shell,
> Thin pair of tights.
> Head band that covers ears.
> Pair of those $1 brown gloves
>
> Closer to 32 F I would add a baclava. Possibly my Pearl Izumi winter full
> finger gloves but the cheap gloves may suffice as they did tonight.


A couple of years ago my wife bought me a couple of thermal cycling
jerseys for winter riding. I love those things. It simplifies the
whole affair:

At 45F I wear a thermal long-sleeve jersey and a pair of tights.
At 32F I'd add a jacket, a headband and thermal cycling gloves.
Below 30F I switch to a balaclava and I add booties for long rides.

Below 20F I usually wimp out and ride my trainer indoors. :)

At this time of year I also put a trunk rack on my bike and throw in
extra gear in case I get a flat or have to stop for any length of time.


-JR
 
B

Brian Huntley

Guest
Claire Petersky wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> > in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?

>
> Carry a hankerchief for your runny nose.


Cotton over-gloves.
 
M

Mike Kaiser

Guest
Claire Petersky wrote:
> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> > in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?

>
> Carry a hankerchief for your runny nose.
>


Or do the farmer blow.
 
M

Matt O'Toole

Guest
On Wed, 09 Nov 2005 22:22:44 -0800, rk73737 wrote:

> I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?


Those are typical mid-winter conditions around here. The only
riding days I miss are when the roads are too slippery. Otherwise there's
no reason not to ride.

As long as the temps are above freezing, the main problem is keeping the
wind off. You really don't need much insulation.

For me, a runny nose below about 60F is inevitable! This varies by
individual, and I don't think there's much you can do about it.

For temps down to the high 30s F, normal long tights, a mid-weight long
sleeve jersey, and a windbreaker are fine, along with a skullcap that
covers my ears, windproof gloves, and some very densely woven wool socks.
Most people would wear booties, but the socks I have seem to do the job. A
little plastic wrap around my toes works wonders on the harsher days.

For lower temps, or if the wind is blowing hard, add windproof
tights. You can wear a shell over your normal tights, or get some special
windproof lycra ones. I'd go with the latter if possible. The fewer
layers on the bottom, the better.

Finally, staying hydrated and nourished, and getting enough sleep, makes a
big difference in cold weather comfort. Also, beware of falling temps at
sundown. Roads can ice up and become treacherous in a hurry, plus you
don't want to get caught out in falling temps in light bike clothes. So
leave more margin for error than you would in milder weather.

Matt O.
 
P

p.k.

Guest
Brian Kelly wrote:
>> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
>> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of
>> riding in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose
>> running, etc.?
>>

>
> That's much too cold to be riding. You will get pneumonia. Best to
> put the bike up for the winter and wait until spring


Nonsence!

I cycle every sunday morning (16 miles) and wednesday evening (28 miles)
through the year in the UK. Temps often well below freezing - the BEST
cycling of the year is at 9am on a sunny February morning, frost still hard
on the ground through Richmond park in London.

Base layer fleece and windproof layer, full finger gloves and long lycra
legs! Plus a buff araound neck and chin. The test we use is feeling
*slightly* cold standing around before setting off.

pk
 
T

The Wogster

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?


Okay, what I am about to say, can work for much colder then 32F, 45F is
actually very nice riding weather, the cool temperatures will keep you
nice and cool, heck some guys wear just a short sleeve Jersey and shorts
at 45F!

As wind speeds increase and temps get colder, wind chill factor can
become a problem. The US National Weather service provides a Wind Chill
Chart and Calculator at ttp://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/windchill/index.shtml
the chart is for degrees F and MPH, but the calculator can handle metric
units as well.

Now a general rule is if your standing still dress for 10C/16F colder
then the wind chill factor, if your doing some activity but not
strenuous then you can dress for the wind chill factor, if your doing
strenuous activity (like cycling) dress for 10C or 16F warmer.

One thing to avoid is cotton, cotton simply gets wet, and wet cotton
next to your skin at colder temperatures is not good. You want either
Polartec(R) or silk next to your skin, because they will transfer
moisture towards the next layer out, you can also use cycling shorts or
pants as this layer. The next layer out is an insulating layer, this
could be non existant at 45F, and a thin polyester fleece at 32F, with a
heavier one in your pack for stops. Then add a windproof, waterproof,
but breathable outer layer, Goretex is an expensive option, there are
cheaper work-alikes available.

You may want to add a moisturizer for your face at cooler temps, this
will prevent wind burn, there are millions of different ones for women,
and about 10 for men, Nivia for Men aftershave balm is a good one,
available scent free and alcohol free..... Rub excess into your hands
to prevent that dry skin problem....

W
 
C

Claire Petersky

Guest
"Mike Kaiser" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Claire Petersky wrote:
>> <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> > Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
>> > in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?

>>
>> Carry a hankerchief for your runny nose.

>
> Or do the farmer blow.



You still get drips, and then your nose gets chapped, or your gloves get
icky. Hankies are very nice.

--
Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
Personal page: http://www.geocities.com/cpetersky/
See the books I've set free at:
http://bookcrossing.com/referral/Cpetersky
 
B

Brian Kelly

Guest
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>


That's much too cold to be riding. You will get pneumonia. Best to put the
bike up for the winter and wait until spring.
 
T

Thomas Wentworth

Guest
Very warm.

================
<[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>
 
A

araby

Guest
"John Everett" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:eek:[email protected]
> On Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:38:54 -0500, "araby" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>><[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>>I would like to ride at at casual pace for 5 hours daily in
>>> temperaturers 32-45F with 15 mph wind. How should I dress to stay
>>> comfortable all day? Are there any problems I should be aware of riding
>>> in these temperatures such as getting too sweaty, nose running, etc.?
>>>

>>I find that feet and ears are the limiting criteria. Zip on overshoes and
>>balaclava are good. Next to the body Polypropoline (sp?)or equivalent
>>next
>>to the skin followed by a wool or equiv. layer and a breathable wind
>>breaker
>>on top. My gloves are Louis Garneau two fingered "lobster" style. This
>>ensemble is good to several degrees below freezing although I agree that
>>the
>>effect of wind chill is a factor too

>
> I'm not sure I agree with the wind chill comment. After all, we create
> our own wind chill. If we're riding on an absolutely calm day we're
> still going to experience a (your speed here) mph effective wind. Feet
> get it even worse, since they're constantly thrashing around in the
> cold air.
>
> There's a HUGE difference between riding into a 15 mph wind and riding
> with the same wind at our back. I generally plan my rides so that I'm
> coming home with the wind at my back. It's then that I'm unzipping
> windbreakers and/or taking off balaclavas, full fingered gloves, etc.;
> but I've never noticed that it has any effect on how my feet feel.


I obviously didn't make myself clear. That's exactly what I meant -apart
from your final comment. I don't understand how the difference between a
headwind and tailwind of 15 mph has no effect on your feet.
 
S

Steve McDonald

Guest
What I wear is a full front fairing. It allows me to ride with
about half the ordinary clothing, whatever the temperature. I never
need gloves. It keeps about half the rain off me. It's saved me from
several thrown eggs, rocks, BBs, etc.

Steve McDonald