Drink!



T

Tim Hall

Guest
When out on the Pino (a tandem,m'lud), I'm conscious that we don't
drink enough. This impairs performance, making hills even harder to
get up and makes Mrs. Hall bad tempered.

The Pino only has two bottle cages, and I can't see space for anymore
on the frame.

Options are:

1. Seat post mounted bottle cage, as used by time triallers.

2. Carrying more bottles in the pannier/rack top bag

3. Camelbak, or simla, slung behind the stoker's seat. (Remember
the stoker sits in front on the Pino)


1 may foul the rack top bag. I'll have to check.

2 means making a stop to swap bottles over.

3 would give Mrs. Hall the greatest chance of keeping topped up, as
she could leave the bite valve positioned nearby. Don't know if
there's room for the camelbak and my knees.



Thoughts? Opinions?



Tim
 
P

Phil Cook

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:

>When out on the Pino (a tandem,m'lud), I'm conscious that we don't
>drink enough. This impairs performance, making hills even harder to
>get up and makes Mrs. Hall bad tempered.
>
>The Pino only has two bottle cages, and I can't see space for anymore
>on the frame.
>
>Options are:
>
>1. Seat post mounted bottle cage, as used by time triallers.
>
>2. Carrying more bottles in the pannier/rack top bag


I think they may have enough on board here :)
http://www.globecyclers.de/media/pics/tandem/unserpino_04.jpg

They look like R+K clickfix to me. They will mount on tubes from 15 to
60mm diameter. http://www.klickfix.de/bottlefixe.htm
--
Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
 
H

Helen Deborah Vecht

Guest
Tim Hall <[email protected]>typed


> When out on the Pino (a tandem,m'lud), I'm conscious that we don't
> drink enough. This impairs performance, making hills even harder to
> get up and makes Mrs. Hall bad tempered.


> The Pino only has two bottle cages, and I can't see space for anymore
> on the frame.


> Options are:


> 1. Seat post mounted bottle cage, as used by time triallers.


> 2. Carrying more bottles in the pannier/rack top bag


> 3. Camelbak, or simla, slung behind the stoker's seat. (Remember
> the stoker sits in front on the Pino)



> 1 may foul the rack top bag. I'll have to check.


> 2 means making a stop to swap bottles over.


> 3 would give Mrs. Hall the greatest chance of keeping topped up, as
> she could leave the bite valve positioned nearby. Don't know if
> there's room for the camelbak and my knees.




> Thoughts? Opinions?




> Tim


I had a handlebar/stem mounted bottle cage on the Pedersen; I don't know
its fate or suitability on the Pino.

Lbh pbhyq fgbc sebz gvzr gb gvzr naq ohl qevaxf ng pnsrf naq chof...

Get bottles that don't leak and put them in your panniers/saddlebag or
whatever.

Drinks straight from a shop fridge taste rather nicer than those that
have hung about plarstick bockles all day...

--
Helen D. Vecht: [email protected]
Edgware.
 
D

David Damerell

Guest
Quoting Tim Hall <[email protected]>:
>When out on the Pino (a tandem,m'lud), I'm conscious that we don't
>drink enough.


Do what we did on the e2e and take the Good Beer Guide. Oh... water?

>2. Carrying more bottles in the pannier/rack top bag
>2 means making a stop to swap bottles over.


But aren't you likely to stop every now and then anyway? The middle bottle
on our tandem is inaccessible, but there's generally a map check or
something when one of the other ones gets empty.
--
David Damerell <[email protected]> Kill the tomato!
Today is Brieday, Presuary.
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 16:55:53 +0100, Helen Deborah Vecht
<[email protected]et.co.uk> wrote:


>> Tim

>
>I had a handlebar/stem mounted bottle cage on the Pedersen; I don't know
>its fate or suitability on the Pino.
>


it's in the garage/bike shed. Don't think it'll fit the Pino. I'll
put it back on the Pedersen, tuits permitting.

>Lbh pbhyq fgbc sebz gvzr gb gvzr naq ohl qevaxf ng pnsrf naq chof...


Last weekend, watching stage 1 of Le Tour, we were moving in a big
convoy, rolling back marker. Not a lot of chance to stop at shops ect
ect. It's the CBA factor that is part of the problem too.

Tim
 
C

Carol Hague

Guest
Tim Hall <[email protected]> wrote:


> 3 would give Mrs. Hall the greatest chance of keeping topped up, as
> she could leave the bite valve positioned nearby. Don't know if
> there's room for the camelbak and my knees.


If you can fit the Camelbak on I'd recommend it - I find that the
presence of the valve close at hand prompts me to drink more often than
I would with a bottle and it's less faffing about as well, which is a
good thing if you're a butterfingers like me.
--
Carol
"If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put
that thing in your mouth. Particularly if the thing is
cats." - Lemony Snicket _The Wide Window_
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
('[email protected]') wrote:

> When out on the Pino (a tandem,m'lud), I'm conscious that we don't
> drink enough. This impairs performance, making hills even harder to
> get up and makes Mrs. Hall bad tempered.
>
> The Pino only has two bottle cages, and I can't see space for anymore
> on the frame.
>
> Options are:
>
> 1. Seat post mounted bottle cage, as used by time triallers.
>
> 2. Carrying more bottles in the pannier/rack top bag
>
> 3. Camelbak, or simla, slung behind the stoker's seat. (Remember
> the stoker sits in front on the Pino)


That's the one I was going to suggest, on a Pino. Indeed, you could sling
one for the stoker on one side of the seat and one for the captain on the
other.

> 1 may foul the rack top bag. I'll have to check.
>
> 2 means making a stop to swap bottles over.
>
> 3 would give Mrs. Hall the greatest chance of keeping topped up, as
> she could leave the bite valve positioned nearby. Don't know if
> there's room for the camelbak and my knees.


Make a sling for the camelback bladder (s) where the bottom of the sling
also attaches to the seat rather than allowing them to angle free. This
should keep them out of the way of your knees. A camelback bladder is not
very large even when full.

Try it - I expect it will work. Report findings.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; Semper in faecibus sumus, sole profundum variat.
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 21:26:24 +0100, Simon Brooke
<[email protected]> wrote:

>in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
>('[email protected]') wrote:
>


>> 3. Camelbak, or simla, slung behind the stoker's seat. (Remember
>> the stoker sits in front on the Pino)

>
>That's the one I was going to suggest, on a Pino. Indeed, you could sling
>one for the stoker on one side of the seat and one for the captain on the
>other.


>
>Make a sling for the camelback bladder (s) where the bottom of the sling
>also attaches to the seat rather than allowing them to angle free. This
>should keep them out of the way of your knees. A camelback bladder is not
>very large even when full.
>
>Try it - I expect it will work. Report findings.


Right. Progress to date:

Tried a mockup of bottle cages on the front seat hand grips, held on
with cable ties. Mrs. Hall is fearless and scoffs at hand grips.
Other possible front seat riders (Brendan (14), the Rat Bag Child and
me would probably need them, so not such a Good Plan.

Further consultation with Mrs. Hall suggested that the Camelbak plan
was the best, so this afternoon we perused misc. outdoor and cycling
shops. Pukka Camelbaks are expensive - 25 quid for a small rucsack
affair, 16 quid for a two litre bladder. Then we went to an army
surplus store. Copy bladder, 1.5l for 9 quid.

Then when we got home, Brendan (14) produced a gym bag he'd made at
school which it fits pretty well. This can be tied to the rear of the
seat, and tucked into the seat frame for stability. We've got a TC
ride tomorrow, so further reports after that.


Tim
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 21:44:02 +0100, Tim Hall
<[email protected]> wrote:

>On Fri, 13 Jul 2007 21:26:24 +0100, Simon Brooke
><[email protected]> wrote:
>


>>Try it - I expect it will work. Report findings.

>
>Right. Progress to date:
>
>Tried a mockup of bottle cages on the front seat hand grips, held on
>with cable ties. Mrs. Hall is fearless and scoffs at hand grips.
>Other possible front seat riders (Brendan (14), the Rat Bag Child and
>me would probably need them, so not such a Good Plan.
>
>Further consultation with Mrs. Hall suggested that the Camelbak plan
>was the best, so this afternoon we perused misc. outdoor and cycling
>shops. Pukka Camelbaks are expensive - 25 quid for a small rucsack
>affair, 16 quid for a two litre bladder. Then we went to an army
>surplus store. Copy bladder, 1.5l for 9 quid.
>
>Then when we got home, Brendan (14) produced a gym bag he'd made at
>school which it fits pretty well. This can be tied to the rear of the
>seat, and tucked into the seat frame for stability. We've got a TC
>ride tomorrow, so further reports after that.
>
>

Back off the TC ride. Hot, damned hot. The gym bag with bladder stayed
in place perfectly. Drinking was no problem, allowing us to get twice
the normal amount of fluid in over the course of the morning. A
success.

I'll take a few photos later.


Tim