Drinking Egg Yolks?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by NYC XYZ, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    Is that still being done?

    How about egg whites? They really have no taste at all, but they pack
    a great wallop of protein...would it be okay/safe/wise to just gulp
    them down like milk in the morning? Or must they be cooked? I'm
    talking about those Egg Beaters and such, the liquid egg whites in a
    little carton...I bought a bunch of 'em on sale but discover that I
    have to be more of a chef than I care to be in order to actually enjoy
    chewing them.

    Is it all right to skip the cooking and just slurp them quickly down?
     
    Tags:


  2. "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > How about egg whites? They really have no taste at all, but they pack
    > a great wallop of protein...would it be okay/safe/wise to just gulp
    > them down like milk in the morning? Or must they be cooked? I'm
    > talking about those Egg Beaters and such, the liquid egg whites in a
    > little carton...I bought a bunch of 'em on sale but discover that I
    > have to be more of a chef than I care to be in order to actually enjoy
    > chewing them.
    >
    > Is it all right to skip the cooking and just slurp them quickly down?


    I hope so: we've been putting them in our smoothies for years.

    GWC
     
  3. On Mon, 18 Jul 2005 12:39:52 -0400, "George Cherry"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>
    >> How about egg whites? They really have no taste at all, but they pack
    >> a great wallop of protein...would it be okay/safe/wise to just gulp
    >> them down like milk in the morning? Or must they be cooked? I'm
    >> talking about those Egg Beaters and such, the liquid egg whites in a
    >> little carton...I bought a bunch of 'em on sale but discover that I
    >> have to be more of a chef than I care to be in order to actually enjoy
    >> chewing them.
    >>
    >> Is it all right to skip the cooking and just slurp them quickly down?

    >
    >I hope so: we've been putting them in our smoothies for years.

    this is a VERY old question. odds are good that you'll be OK.
    the responders that say they are OK are working with n=1.
    statistically not so valid. in a big population, given enough
    time and consumers, some folk will get sick and die.
    i wouldn't want to be one of them.
    ....thehick
     
  4. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    I wouldn't want to be in need of a toilet on the bus after breakfast,
    for example!



    frank-in-toronto wrote:
    >
    > this is a VERY old question. odds are good that you'll be OK.
    > the responders that say they are OK are working with n=1.
    > statistically not so valid. in a big population, given enough
    > time and consumers, some folk will get sick and die.
    > i wouldn't want to be one of them.
    > ...thehick
     
  5. NYC XYZ wrote:
    > Is that still being done?
    >
    > How about egg whites? They really have no taste at all, but they pack
    > a great wallop of protein...would it be okay/safe/wise to just gulp
    > them down like milk in the morning? Or must they be cooked? I'm
    > talking about those Egg Beaters and such, the liquid egg whites in a
    > little carton...I bought a bunch of 'em on sale but discover that I
    > have to be more of a chef than I care to be in order to actually enjoy
    > chewing them.
    >
    > Is it all right to skip the cooking and just slurp them quickly down?


    COMMENT:

    The Egg Beaters are a lot safer than raw egg, being pasteurized.

    Plain raw eggs have a tiny risk of giving you salmonella. This is
    inside the egg, so you can't wash it off.

    Most healthy people will get away with it. A few with the wrong immune
    systems won't.

    Does the risk from cooking the egg thoroughly (yolk solid), and
    oxidizing the cholesterol, outweigh the tiny risk from salmonella if
    you eat it soft boiled, sunny side up, or just plain raw, so you DON'T
    oxidize the cholesterol? No doubt that depends on your coronary artery
    disease risk, vs. how good your immune system is.

    If you have any question about the trade-off, just drink the Egg
    Beaters. It will have less salmonella (even raw), and NO cholesterol.

    SBH
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    "NYC XYZ" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I wouldn't want to be in need of a toilet on the bus after breakfast,
    > for example!



    IME, it takes about 8 hours to get sick from Salmonella...

    I've only had it once. ;-)

    I still eat raw eggs........

    Been eating them for over 20 years and only got sick once.
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  7. >Plain raw eggs have a tiny risk of giving you salmonella. This is
    inside the egg, so you can't wash it off.>

    If you are informed, you'd know eggs have a HUGE amount of salmonella
    in them. Also if you saw the egg expose on TV you'd have seen them
    repackaging eggs that were long outdated. You take your life in your
    hands eating sunnyside up, nevermind raw.
     
  8. [email protected] wrote:
    > >Plain raw eggs have a tiny risk of giving you salmonella. This is

    > inside the egg, so you can't wash it off.>
    >
    > If you are informed, you'd know eggs have a HUGE amount of salmonella
    > in them. Also if you saw the egg expose on TV you'd have seen them
    > repackaging eggs that were long outdated. You take your life in your
    > hands eating sunnyside up, nevermind raw.


    COMMENT:

    I said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?

    SBH
     
  9. > said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.
    The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life

    in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>

    You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    than going for a ride.
     
  10. NYC XYZ

    NYC XYZ Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >
    > in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >
    > You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    > Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    > than going for a ride.



    Just curious how those bodybuilders ever managed...(this was a '70s
    thing, right?).
     
  11. Bob Falooley

    Bob Falooley Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    >>Plain raw eggs have a tiny risk of giving you salmonella. This is

    >
    > inside the egg, so you can't wash it off.>
    >
    > If you are informed, you'd know eggs have a HUGE amount of salmonella
    > in them. Also if you saw the egg expose on TV you'd have seen them
    > repackaging eggs that were long outdated. You take your life in your
    > hands eating sunnyside up, nevermind raw.
    >


    I don't know what the TV says, but I eat anywhere from 3 - 9 eggs a day
    with the yolks as runny as I can get them and I am fine. I also eat 1 -
    3 cans of tuna a day and I am fine.

    Question, If you don't eat raw eggs, do you eat Mayonaise, which has raw
    eggs in it.

    --Falooley
     
  12. Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com wrote:
    > NYC XYZ wrote:
    >
    >>Is that still being done?
    >>
    >>How about egg whites? They really have no taste at all, but they pack
    >>a great wallop of protein...would it be okay/safe/wise to just gulp
    >>them down like milk in the morning? Or must they be cooked? I'm
    >>talking about those Egg Beaters and such, the liquid egg whites in a
    >>little carton...I bought a bunch of 'em on sale but discover that I
    >>have to be more of a chef than I care to be in order to actually enjoy
    >>chewing them.
    >>
    >>Is it all right to skip the cooking and just slurp them quickly down?

    >
    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > The Egg Beaters are a lot safer than raw egg, being pasteurized.
    >
    > Plain raw eggs have a tiny risk of giving you salmonella. This is
    > inside the egg, so you can't wash it off.


    I read several times that salmonella is only found on the outer surface
    of the shell not inside the egg - provided the egg shell have not been
    cracked. Thus washing the egg under a stream of water while rubbing the
    surface should lower the possibility of getting sick.

    --
    Dawid Michalczyk
    http://www.art.eonworks.com - Art and Illustration
     
  13. <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >> said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    > The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    > sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    >
    > in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >
    > You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    > Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    > than going for a ride.


    The folks who raise and sell "Country Hen" eggs state

    Can I use raw eggs in cooking?

    We have had our barns tested by the state for about 7 years
    now, and have been salmonella free. Feel free to use our
    eggs in any kind of cooking. We make a mean eggnog here
    at the farm. See our section on recipes for that one.


    You can find their website

    http://www.countryhen.com/

    George W. Chery
     
  14. Dr. Dickie

    Dr. Dickie Guest

    "George Cherry" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >> said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    > > The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    > > sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    > >
    > > in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    > >
    > > You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    > > Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    > > than going for a ride.

    >
    > The folks who raise and sell "Country Hen" eggs state
    >
    > Can I use raw eggs in cooking?
    >
    > We have had our barns tested by the state for about 7 years
    > now, and have been salmonella free. Feel free to use our
    > eggs in any kind of cooking. We make a mean eggnog here
    > at the farm. See our section on recipes for that one.
    >
    >
    > You can find their website
    >
    > http://www.countryhen.com/
    >
    > George W. Chery
    >
    >


    Over the last 20 years or so, the salmonella content of eggs has been
    seriously reduced IIRC.
    20 years ago, you were playing russian roulette, today you would be hitting
    the lottery. Not the lottery you want to hit mind you.
    Hard to find a study like this in the US (I am not going to take the time to
    search); however, if you buy your eggs in Poland, you're safe:


    International Journal of Food Microbiology
    Volume 64, Issues 1-2 , 28 February 2001, Pages 189-191

    Occurrence of Salmonella spp. in consumption eggs in Poland

    Mieczysaw Radkowski

    Warmia and Masuria University at Olsztyn, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,
    Department of Animal Products Hygiene,10-957 Olsztyn, Kortowo II, Poland

    Received 17 December 1999; revised 18 July 2000; accepted 10 August 2000.
    Available online 13 February 2001.

    Abstract
    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of Salmonellae on
    egg shells in markets in Olsztyn, Poland. An investigation carried out by
    the Sanitary and Epidemiological Station into cases of food poisoning caused
    in Poland by Salmonella spp. in recent years showed that the largest number
    of outbreaks is connected with consuming foods containing hens eggs which
    had not undergone heat treatment, such as mayonnaise, creams, ice-cream and
    other products. The world egg production amounts to 400 billion, in Poland
    it reaches the level of around 8 billion per year. A total of 1200 eggs were
    purchased in 40 local markets in Olsztyn were examined for the presence of
    Salmonella between June 1997 and December 1998. Salmonella was not found on
    the shell or inside the eggs. From this study it would appear that the
    incidence of Salmonellae on eggs from Olsztyn shops is very low.
     
  15. JMW

    JMW Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >> said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.
    >>The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    >>sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    >>in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?

    >
    >You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.


    References, pleas.
     
  16. Don

    Don Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >>
    >> You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    >> Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    >> than going for a ride.

    >
    >
    >Just curious how those bodybuilders ever managed...(this was a '70s
    >thing, right?).
    >


    In the 70's, the egg factories were smaller, and used less antibiotics.
    Salmonella IN eggs was rare.
     
  17. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Don) wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > >
    > >
    > >[email protected] wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    > >>
    > >> You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    > >> Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    > >> than going for a ride.

    > >
    > >
    > >Just curious how those bodybuilders ever managed...(this was a '70s
    > >thing, right?).
    > >

    >
    > In the 70's, the egg factories were smaller, and used less antibiotics.
    > Salmonella IN eggs was rare.
    >


    It still is.......

    I've eaten literally hundreds of raw and runny yolked eggs in my life.
    I'm 43. I've only had Salmonella once, and that was from a
    damaged/cracked egg from my own birds!

    My housemate gathered them that day. I did not realize the egg had been
    cracked in the nest, not during the washing process.

    It had undetected chicken fecal contamination and I should have been
    paying better attention. When _I_ gather eggs, any damaged egg is
    destroyed immediately by tossing out into the middle of the henyard to
    smash on the ground.

    I've NEVER gotten Salmonella from a raw commercial egg.

    It's probably more rare now than it was in the 70's.

    I bet my life on it nearly every day.

    My new ER co-pay is $100.00 per visit. :p
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  18. [email protected] wrote:
    > > said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    > The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    > sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    >
    > in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >
    > You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    > Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    > than going for a ride.


    COMMENT:

    Statistics, please? People killed by salmonella each year (we'll
    charitably assume ALL are caused by raw egg) vs. people killed in
    autos? Hope the shock doesn't harm you.

    SBH
     
  19. David  Cohen

    David Cohen Guest

    "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> > said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    >> The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    >> sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    >>
    >> in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >>
    >> You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    >> Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    >> than going for a ride.

    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > Statistics, please? People killed by salmonella each year (we'll
    > charitably assume ALL are caused by raw egg) vs. people killed in
    > autos? Hope the shock doesn't harm you.


    Doc, you're talking to one of our (MFW's) most prolific, juvenile, trolls.

    Not that SMN doesn't have it's own <clearing throat> John Godhe</>, but,
    there you go.

    David
     
  20. Dr Tomato

    Dr Tomato Guest

    "Sbharris[atsign]ix.netcom.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> > said you have a tiny risk of salmonella, and that is correct.

    >> The idea that you take your life in your hands when you eat an egg
    >> sunnyside up, is probably literally true. But trite. You take your life
    >>
    >> in your hands when you go on a Sunday drive. So what?>
    >>
    >> You are very poorly informed. About 1 in 3 eggs contains salmonella.
    >> Eating them raw is dangerous. A significantly more dangerous practice
    >> than going for a ride.

    >
    > COMMENT:
    >
    > Statistics, please? People killed by salmonella each year (we'll
    > charitably assume ALL are caused by raw egg) vs. people killed in
    > autos? Hope the shock doesn't harm you.
    >
    > SBH


    About 15 or so year ago in the UK, a few people. This sold a lot of newspapers and
    meant that getting a soft-boiled egg was impossible at a B&B I stayed at in 1990.

    To put this in perspective, in the second half of 2002 there were six outbreak of notified
    Salmonella illness, including 350 cases and 2 deaths. There have been suggestions that
    Spanish eggs are involved, but this is not clear. Good practice includes discarding
    cracked eggs, pasteurised eggs for light or uncooked courses, and normal kitchen
    hygiene (to avoid cross-contamination).

    http://www.foodnavigator.com/news/news-ng.asp?id=50776-salmonella-slashed-by

    This notes 1 in 290 cartons (six eggs) were positive for Salmonella. A lot less than 1 in 3.


    T.
     
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