Drop Bear Stalks Australian Riders



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Oyster

Guest
Taken from here-
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/04/10756663635665765.html

"Two Aussie Mountain Bikers were saved from certain death this morning when a Farmer fired shots at
a stalking Drop Bear. The riders had been on a 3 day, cross country ride, in N.S.W's Goulburn River
National Park, when the female of the group first spotted the Drop Bear stalking them.

"It was the smell I noticed first. It was a horrid, decaying flesh smell. When I turned around to
see what was causing the smell I saw the Drop Bear hide behind a tree. That was on the first day. It
stayed with us ever since. It was like it was taunting us. At one stage, it actually grabbed my
husband but then let him go! We were certain that we were going to die. Luckily we came across the
Farmer, who fired a couple of shots. It took off at a great speed and we haven't seen it since." The
couple did not wish to give their name.

The farmer also wished to remain anonymous but said "You get a lot of the bears around here.
Tourists have to realise that it's wild country, filled with wild, dangerous animals."
 
D

Dave W

Guest
"Oyster" <[email protected]> had this to say
news:[email protected]

> Taken from here- http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/04/10756663635665765.html
>
> "Two Aussie Mountain Bikers were saved from certain death this morning when a Farmer fired shots
> at a stalking Drop Bear. The riders had been on a 3 day, cross country ride, in N.S.W's Goulburn
> River National Park, when the female of the group first spotted the Drop Bear stalking them.
>
> "It was the smell I noticed first. It was a horrid, decaying flesh smell. When I turned around to
> see what was causing the smell I saw the Drop Bear hide behind a tree. That was on the first day.
> It stayed with us ever since. It was like it was taunting us. At one stage, it actually grabbed my
> husband but then let him go! We were certain that we were going to die. Luckily we came across the
> Farmer, who fired a couple of shots. It took off at a great speed and we haven't seen it since."
> The couple did not wish to give their name.
>
> The farmer also wished to remain anonymous but said "You get a lot of the bears around here.
> Tourists have to realise that it's wild country, filled with wild, dangerous animals."
>
>
>

Hey White, this bear seems to have the Stalking thing down pretty good, perhaps you two could
compare notes. Hopefully no one will fire a couple of shots in your direction though. (ok, I was
lying on the last part)
 
W

Westie

Guest
Oyster wrote:
> Taken from here- http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/04/10756663635665765.html
>
> "Two Aussie Mountain Bikers were saved from certain death this morning when a Farmer fired shots
> at a stalking Drop Bear. The riders had been on a 3 day, cross country ride, in N.S.W's Goulburn
> River National Park, when the female of the group first spotted the Drop Bear stalking them.
>
> "It was the smell I noticed first. It was a horrid, decaying flesh smell. When I turned around to
> see what was causing the smell I saw the Drop Bear hide behind a tree. That was on the first day.
> It stayed with us ever since. It was like it was taunting us. At one stage, it actually grabbed my
> husband but then let him go! We were certain that we were going to die. Luckily we came across the
> Farmer, who fired a couple of shots. It took off at a great speed and we haven't seen it since."
> The couple did not wish to give their name.
>
> The farmer also wished to remain anonymous but said "You get a lot of the bears around here.
> Tourists have to realise that it's wild country, filled with wild, dangerous animals."

Is the Drop Bear common in Australia? I'm curious because when I was backpacking up the East Coast
of Oz six years ago a couple of us went to one of the Koala Bear parks. The tour guide explained
about the meaning of the name "Koala" - that it was aborigine for "One who drinks water". A couple
of nights later as we drunkenly wobbled back to the campsite under the dark gum trees I made up a
story about the dread "Drop Bear" (or Koala-wola ("the one who drinks blood) of the Australia
Outback just to wind the girls up. It would lurk in the inky blackness high up in the gum trees and
silently drop upon it's unsuspecting victim from above. Tiny furry paws would grasp your shoulders
and neck just before tiny pointy teeth would slice into the jugular vein. It was good humour for a
week or two that we were together and we used the p[hrase "Watch out for the Drop Bears" as a sort
of in joke for a while. I had never heard of Drop Bears before. Never have since until today
either. Curious.
--
Westie (Replace 'invalid' with 'yahoo' when replying.)
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
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> Is the Drop Bear common in Australia?

Very common, often seen around camp sites, especially the ones frequented by female Scandinavian back packers. Appearances usually result in much merriment on behalf of macho young Australian men. Drop bears are often calmed by the site of an eski full of coldies.;)
 
K

Kantspel

Guest
Oyster wrote:
> Taken from here- http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/04/10756663635665765.html
>
> "Two Aussie Mountain Bikers were saved from certain death this morning when a Farmer fired shots
> at a stalking Drop Bear.

So I go googling for "Drop Bear", as I'd never heard of them. Being more of a picture book kinda
guy I hit google images first and the third line down has a photo that I excitedly click on to see
one of these creatures. Alas it is merely a bear but concidinkily enough it's on Pete Fagerlins
site! Small web
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"Rob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > Is the Drop Bear common in Australia?
>
> Very, they're more dangerous than the snakes, sharks, spiders and
crocodiles. Not much good for tourism though.

Don't forget the "hoop" snake... more dangerous again.. but thankfully in much lower numbers than
drop bears.

Be careful out there folks! hippy
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
In news:[email protected],
kantspel <[email protected]> typed:
> Oyster wrote:
>> Taken from here- http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/02/04/10756663635665765.html
>>
>> "Two Aussie Mountain Bikers were saved from certain death this morning when a Farmer fired shots
>> at a stalking Drop Bear.
>
> So I go googling for "Drop Bear", as I'd never heard of them. Being more of a picture book kinda
> guy I hit google images first and the third line down has a photo that I excitedly click on to see
> one of these creatures. Alas it is merely a bear but concidinkily enough it's on Pete Fagerlins
> site! Small web

My googling resulted in this:

"According to legend, Drop Bears are dangerous creatures that hide in gum trees. You can tell if one
of them is hiding in a tree by lying on your back beneath the tree and spitting upwards. If the Drop
Bear is up there, it'll spit back. "

Mike - y'all come to Virginia for a snipe hunt sometime. ;^)
 
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