"drop-in" gas range sought

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John B, Feb 15, 2005.

  1. John B

    John B Guest

    Or, perhaps, a wrench and screwdriver. Good point. I'll keep it in mind.
    Thanks!

    "Noon-Air" <[email protected]> wrote
    > The difference between the drop-in and the free standing ranges is nothing
    > more than a sawzall
    >
    >
     


  2. john

    john Guest

    John B
    some gas slide in style ovens have a draw in the bottom under
    the oven door i wonder if you remove the door the oven would
    "drop in" and a small amount of cabinet trim could match up the
    bottom gap?

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=20712&item=3874513101
    note the drawer at the bottom looks like you could remove it
    and have the stove recessed about 2 inches at the bottom.
    i believe the reason they do not sell drop in gas ranges is
    WARNING WARNING Will Robinson (robot voice off)
    doesn't natural gas tend to gather in low lying areas... wouldn't
    a drop in cabinet be a low lying area....?? this older design
    might no longer be available because of the potential for faulty
    valves & fittings leaking into a confined space...

    the drop in style most likely has a pedestal that some of the weight is
    distributed on. if you can lift the stove out of the spot slightly to take
    a look you might get a better feel for what you need to do to get it to
    work. measure the counter height to make sure the final height can be
    achieved with standard products...

    also if this is an apartment, sometime land lords will deduct the
    improvements
    from the rent. talk to them about this...i would think you could neatly cut
    the bottom part of the cabinet down to accommodate a modern appliance.
    john


    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Can anyone advise me where, in the USA, I might buy a new "drop-in"
    > 30-inch-wide gas range? I can't find one. It would be used as a
    > replacement for an apartment kitchen. I have found a drop-in electric
    > range, but building owners don't want to upgrade the electrical resouce at
    > the kitchen. Gas is already there.
    >
    >
     
  3. "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Good point. That was my first position. However, I am relying on others
    > who claim that the repair parts are unavailable. But thank you for
    > reminding me of this concept.
    > The thermostat is shot. I put a thermometer in the oven and watched it go
    > well beyond the temperature prescribed at the user interface. The oven
    > burner doesn't always light promptly, giving fear of explosion. The top
    > needs a paint job.
    >


    Check out this place.
    http://www.antiquegasstoves.com/pages/rebuild.html I have no idea of price,
    but if anyone can, these guys teem to be able to do it.
     
  4. John B

    John B Guest

  5. willshak

    willshak Guest

    On 2/15/2005 12:32 PM US(ET), John B took fingers to keys, and typed the
    following:

    >Range/oven combo.
    >
    >"willshak" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >
    >>Do you mean just the range top, or a range/oven combo?
    >>


    OK, that's what mine is. It is a drop-in with a flange on the sides of
    the top that lays on the countertop and is covered by the lift up range
    top. I had to build a base for it since it doesn't have a leg to stand
    on. Try Sears.

    --
    Bill
     
  6. willshak

    willshak Guest

    On 2/15/2005 4:18 PM US(ET), willshak took fingers to keys, and typed
    the following:

    > On 2/15/2005 12:32 PM US(ET), John B took fingers to keys, and typed
    > the following:
    >
    >> Range/oven combo.
    >>
    >> "willshak" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >>
    >>> Do you mean just the range top, or a range/oven combo?
    >>>

    >
    > OK, that's what mine is. It is a drop-in with a flange on the sides of
    > the top that lays on the countertop and is covered by the lift up
    > range top. I had to build a base for it since it doesn't have a leg to
    > stand on. Try Sears.
    >


    Here are 30" drop-ins at Sears
    http://tinyurl.com/5fhox

    --
    Bill
     
  7. willshak

    willshak Guest

    On 2/15/2005 4:29 PM US(ET), Edwin Pawlowski took fingers to keys, and
    typed the following:

    >"willshak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >
    >>Here are 30" drop-ins at Sears
    >>http://tinyurl.com/5fhox
    >>
    >>--
    >>Bill
    >>
    >>

    >
    >He needs gas, no hookup for electric.
    >

    Sorry about that. I see Sears doesn't sell gas range/ovens anymore.

    --
    Bill
     
  8. Noon-Air

    Noon-Air Guest

    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Or, perhaps, a wrench and screwdriver. Good point. I'll keep it in mind.
    > Thanks!
    >
    > "Noon-Air" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> The difference between the drop-in and the free standing ranges is
    >> nothing
    >> more than a sawzall



    Ummm....the sawzall was for the kickplate on the cabinet
     
  9. John B

    John B Guest

    Naw. That's what I'm trying to avoid. The kickplate is beautiful, coved
    linoleum.
    Thanks for the follow-up.
    What do you think of modifying a slide-in to a drop-in? It IS a
    subtraction.
    "Noon-Air" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:D[email protected]
    >
    > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Or, perhaps, a wrench and screwdriver. Good point. I'll keep it in

    mind.
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > > "Noon-Air" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >> The difference between the drop-in and the free standing ranges is
    > >> nothing
    > >> more than a sawzall

    >
    >
    > Ummm....the sawzall was for the kickplate on the cabinet
    >
    >
     
  10. Hairy

    Hairy Guest

    "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Edwin Pawlowski got it right.
    > A "slide in" sits on the ground, and as such, has a vertical height of
    > perhaps 36" without respect to any backsplash that might be included in

    the
    > model.
    > As "drop in" has a vertical dimension of about 30", yet when it is
    > installed, its top is at counter height...about 36". How is this
    > accomplished? The drop-in rests on the counter, and perhaps on blocks

    down
    > near the floor.
    > A "drop in" oven specifies a shorter horizontal distance between

    surrounding
    > cabinet and countertop; i.e., closer gap.
    > The kitchen has beautiful tile work, cabinetry, and coved floor. This

    would
    > have to be massacred to fit a slide-in range. All existing dimensions are
    > suited for drop-in, not slide-in or free-standing range.


    We have the Maytag MGS5770 as seen in Vox's link. It rests on top of the
    counter and has feet at the bottom. Main drawback for you ( I believe) would
    be the bottom drawer if you want to keep your kickboard.
    H
     
  11. ameijers

    ameijers Guest

    "George" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > John B wrote:
    > > No. I know what a "slide-in" range is, and that is not what I am asking
    > > for. Thank you for your reply, however.
    > >
    > >

    > Out of curiousity why is a "slide-in" version not suitable?


    Sounds like a 1960s kitchen. A counter-height-opening wall oven in a tall
    cabinet, with a drop-in cooktop in the counter right next to it, were quite
    common. Pretty good odds the thing is that lovely 2-tone brown 'coppertone'
    color. Around the time the appliances crap out, the Missus usually decides
    entire kitchen needs a gut job, and another set of solid maple cherry-finish
    cabinets hits the landfill, replaced by chipboard junk. Plug-n-run
    replacement appliances in those formats are probably getting quite hard to
    find.

    aem sends...
     
  12. Bob Haar

    Bob Haar Guest

    On 2005/2/15 11:12 AM, "John B" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Can anyone advise me where, in the USA, I might buy a new "drop-in"
    > 30-inch-wide gas range? I can't find one. It would be used as a
    > replacement for an apartment kitchen. I have found a drop-in electric
    > range, but building owners don't want to upgrade the electrical resouce at
    > the kitchen. Gas is already there.
    >
    >


    We have a GE "gas on glass" unit. It is the 5 burner 36" model but they
    make a 30" unit as well.
     
  13. John B

    John B Guest

    Tell me more.
    Is it GAS?
    Can you suggest a model number?
    Thanks.

    "Bob Haar" <[email protected]> wrote

    > We have a GE "gas on glass" unit. It is the 5 burner 36" model but they
    > make a 30" unit as well.
    >
     
  14. John B

    John B Guest

    Thanks for trying.

    "Bob Haar" <[email protected]> wrote i

    > After seeing some later posts, I realize that what we have is not what you
    > are looking for. It is gas but is only the top burners, not the

    cooktop/oven
    > combo.
    >
     
  15. "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Nope.
    > http://www.dealtime.com/xPF-Maytag_MGS5770ADW_MGS5770ADB_MGS5770ADQ_MGS5770ADC
    > This sits on the ground. Not a candidate.
    > Specs are poorly described. No description of ampacity requirement, even
    > though there is a need for electricity.


    Most gas ranges that need electgricity run off a standard 1`5A outlet. The
    juice is needed for the electronic ignition, clock, timers, oven light.




    > What is "sabbath mode," anyway?
    >


    Traditional Jewish law prevents labor on the Sabbath and that includes
    starting a fire. Sabbath mode keeps the oven on a very low flame so you are
    technically not starting a fire, merely adjusting it. Kosher kitchens and
    rules are very interesting.
    --
    Ed
    http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/
     
  16. John B

    John B Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote >
    > Most gas ranges that need electgricity run off a standard 15A outlet.

    The
    > juice is needed for the electronic ignition, clock, timers, oven light.

    That electrical resource is already in place. A 40Amp @ 240 VAC connection
    is not.
    >
    > > What is "sabbath mode," anyway?
    > >

    >
    > Traditional Jewish law prevents labor on the Sabbath and that includes
    > starting a fire. Sabbath mode keeps the oven on a very low flame so you

    are
    > technically not starting a fire, merely adjusting it. Kosher kitchens and
    > rules are very interesting.

    So is such an oven conscious of the day of the week?
    Doesn't a proper kosher kitchen have duplication in numerous facilities?
    That, of course, would be impossible here.
    > --
    > Ed
    > http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/

    What if the fire is already lit (pilot)? Is it OK to just make the fire
    bigger?
     
  17. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 08:12:35 -0800, "John B" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Can anyone advise me where, in the USA, I might buy a new "drop-in"
    > 30-inch-wide gas range? I can't find one. It would be used as a
    > replacement for an apartment kitchen. I have found a drop-in electric
    > range, but building owners don't want to upgrade the electrical resouce at
    > the kitchen. Gas is already there.
    >

    Are you looking on the internet or in your local outlet
    stores?

    sf
     
  18. sf

    sf Guest

    On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 09:32:09 -0800, "John B" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Range/oven combo.
    >
    > "willshak" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >
    > > Do you mean just the range top, or a range/oven combo?

    >

    Do you really mean drop-in or are you looking for slide-in?


    sf
     
  19. Vox Humana

    Vox Humana Guest

    "Edwin Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "John B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Nope.
    > >

    http://www.dealtime.com/xPF-Maytag_MGS5770ADW_MGS5770ADB_MGS5770ADQ_MGS5770ADC
    > > This sits on the ground. Not a candidate.
    > > Specs are poorly described. No description of ampacity requirement,

    even
    > > though there is a need for electricity.

    >
    > Most gas ranges that need electgricity run off a standard 1`5A outlet.

    The
    > juice is needed for the electronic ignition, clock, timers, oven light.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > What is "sabbath mode," anyway?
    > >

    >
    > Traditional Jewish law prevents labor on the Sabbath and that includes
    > starting a fire. Sabbath mode keeps the oven on a very low flame so you

    are
    > technically not starting a fire, merely adjusting it. Kosher kitchens and
    > rules are very interesting.
    > --


    On some ovens, Sabbath mode just overrides the automatic shut-off. Many
    oven will turn off after 12 hours, assuming that you simply forgot to turn
    it off after removing the food. When you put it in Sabbath mode, it stays
    on at the same temperature until you cancel it. Not only do you not have to
    light the fire, you don't have to touch the controls. I also believe that
    Sabbath mode prevents the light from turning on and off in some ovens -
    again, preventing you from lighting a fire.
     
  20. "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Tue, 15 Feb 2005 09:32:09 -0800, "John B" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Range/oven combo.
    >>
    >> "willshak" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> >
    >> > Do you mean just the range top, or a range/oven combo?

    >>

    > Do you really mean drop-in or are you looking for slide-in?
    >
    >
    > sf


    He really meant drop in. He really meant gas, not electric. If you search
    some of the popular manufacturers of ranges, no one still offers a drop in
    gas that I can see.
     
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