dropping chain

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by blkhotrod, Mar 3, 2008.

  1. blkhotrod

    blkhotrod New Member

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    any recommendations on proper shifting pattern when climbing to reduce this occurance. front deraileur adjustments have not helped much.
     
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  2. daveryanwyoming

    daveryanwyoming Well-Known Member

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    Well, don't shift too late when the drive train is under high loads. But really you shouldn't be dropping chains while shifting. Is your front derailleur at the appropriate height? Do you have too many links in your chain leading to loose chain? Are you running a triple or wide gear ratios? Are you crosschaining prior to the chainring downshift?

    Modern drive trains shouldn't drop chains very often. Are you sure everything is adjusted properly or have you had someone from a good LBS look at it?

    BTW, you might get better responses to this question in the Cycling-Equipment forum, not the training forum. Getting your gear to operate correctly isn't usually considered part of training.

    Good luck,
    -Dave
     
  3. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    Anticipate the need for the small chainring as you approach the hill, then make that the first shift you do at the bottom of the hill (presumably while still in the middle of the cassette). If you *have* to drop to the small ring mid-hill, shift up a gear or two on the back before you shift the front down.

    The biggest danger of dropping the chain is from shifting the front when you're already on the inside rear cog.
     
  4. Steve_B

    Steve_B New Member

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    Third Eye or other similar chain-watcher device (mounts on your down tube) can be helpful if you are dropping it to the inside, which is what happens most of the time.

    Getting your front derraileur adjusted correctly is very important as is having the chain a proper length.

    Worst comes to worst, remember to shift to the largest cog in the back (the easiest gear) before shifting to the small ring in the front. Being in the largest cog in the back will take up slack in your chain and this is often why chains drop to the inside.
     
  5. blkhotrod

    blkhotrod New Member

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    thank you all. think i understand how to minimize it now.
     
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