Drumbrake Replacement Pads

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by 75446446464, Aug 7, 2007.

  1. 75446446464

    75446446464 New Member

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    Here is a picture of the inside of my drum brake (probably weighs as much as most of your racing wheels) [​IMG]
    The pads don't seem easily replaceable. They don't seem to be made of rubber but to my touch felt like smooth stone. I'm wondering what I do when I need to replace them? Not having seen them until a couple of days ago, I don't know how thick they were when new, so I don't have any idea how long I've got left. Anyone here familiar with drum brakes? This is a Dutch bike (Batavus Cambridge).
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    It's quite rare to have to replace anything in a brake like that, they tend to be good for a lot of use before anything wears out. Heck, not even Sheldon Brown's site has anything about such a repair...

    Well, they aren't. They're of a compound that's fairly similar to the the brake pads on a car or motorbike or disc brake pads for bikes.

    You can get a slight clue if you compare thickness at the center vs thickness at the ends. If pad thickness is about equal overall you have some way to go yet.
    Odds are, you'll never have to. Something else is likely to cause you to give that bike up before brake wear becomes an issue.
    Unless you are able to track spare parts either through the manufacturer of the bike or the manufacturer of the brake the best economy is probably found in replacing the hub.
    But if you insist on replacing the pads I suggest you start by looking in your local Yellow pages. You should be able to find a company that does brakes and clutches for industrial applications, and they should be able to cut and mount some new pads for you. (If they WANT do, and if you are willing to pay the cost is another matter entirely...)
     
  3. Mick Parry

    Mick Parry New Member

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    I was once employed by the Post Office as a Purchasing Manager and I was responsible for buying the Postmans bicycle.

    If you care to look at a modern post office bicycle, you will notice that they are all fitted with drum brakes. These bicycles take a pounding brakewise, you imagine have 60lbs of envelopes placed above a front wheel plus a heavy Postman and having to stop that little lot.

    I purchased an average of 6000 bicyles each year and they lasted for six years. I never once had to buy a replacement pad. The reason being is that they will outlast the bicycle.

    So do not worry.

    Regards

    Mick


     
  4. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    Motorcycle restorers will bond a new lining on an old shoe for you.

    If it's riveted on, you don't want to wear it down until the rivets gouge the brake surface. I got a used car like that once but have only had my Sturmey drums for about a year of very occasional use, so have not done it with a bike.
     
  5. threaded

    threaded New Member

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    Depends on the make. Some like Arai it's a simple cheap replacement. At the other extreme with some brands it's cheaper to have a whole new hub and have the wheel rebuilt at the same time.

    Anyways, how good is your german? Acelo
     
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