Drying cycle gear

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Pippin, Oct 10, 2005.

  1. Pippin

    Pippin New Member

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    I've been charged by my employer with the honorus task of finding an electric drying cabinet for those who get soaked cycling to work.
    Personally, I don't get it, why not just dump your wet gubbins into a carrier bag and wash them at home, but ...
    Have you got good advice on the best way of drying wet gear at work?
    Have you heard of a manufacturer of electric drying cupboards?

    Cheers!
    :eek:
     
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  2. eric_the_red

    eric_the_red New Member

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  3. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    Most cycling gear will be ruined if force-dried.
    Time was when you got to work, wet or dry, and got on with your job. It didn't matter how you got in.
     
  4. Eden

    Eden New Member

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    Gotta agree with Don, use heat to dry your lycra and it'll fall apart. I always just put the stuff on the no heat spin setting (takes about 2.5 hours to dry a whole load it like this) or dry it on a rack - depends on how much time I have.
    I only walk about 2 blocks to get to work so I don't have to worry so much about getting wet, but if I did bike commute it would be nice to have a place to dry wet stuff for the trip home. Sure I'd want to change when I got there into work clothes, but I wouldn't really relish putting my wet things back on for the trip home.
     
  5. Don Shipp

    Don Shipp New Member

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    I keep a spare pair of shorts and a pair of socks at work and wear a race cape if it rains. It isnt only cyclists who get wet, or for that matter who sweat on a hot day. I don't think that facilities for cyclists can really be justified.
     
  6. athoma00

    athoma00 New Member

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    just a steady stream of normal temperature is all thats needed. I'm lucky to work at an industrial site with lots of fan cooled motors and equipment rooms with strong aircon I can hang my clothes in. It's nice to have dry clothing to get back into before leaving for home - even though its probably still persisting down outside :eek:
     
  7. bluecann

    bluecann New Member

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    hmmm, when i take mine out of the washer and hang them to dry it only takes a couple hours and theyre dry and most of that time is for the chamois. i say just wring them out & hang them. they should dry themselves by the time work is over.
     
  8. Pippin

    Pippin New Member

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    I guess I'm in the minority here, when I say that lycra makes you look like a complete idiot. Just my opinion, I'm sure some people really dig it. Anyway I'm a baggy shorts and T-shirt kind of a guy, and that takes a bit longer to drain.
    Most of the guys who cycle round here are old duffers on creaky racers anyway, I haven't seen them cycling, but I can't imagine their into The Fashion.
    I've only actually cycled to work once, as its about sixteen miles each way, but I promise to start Reeeeeall soon.
    For the moment, though, I'm car sharing with a nice guy who loves to rant about cyclists running lights, hopping on pavements and generally abusing the roads with suicidal glee. Bless.
     
  9. Peka

    Peka New Member

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    If you're going to be riding 16miles each way, your ass will thank you for buying proper (padded) cycling pants ;)
     
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