Dupont imron paint

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Volnix, May 12, 2016.

  1. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Messages:
    2,883
    Likes Received:
    139
    Sorry for being away lately but I was busy sitting on my ass doing nothing which is actually pretty damn sweet.

    So quick question, I think I will start working on that old Peugeot UH12 and first thing I will do if I manage to remove that absurd threaded fork is to paint the frame.

    The fork is chrome and I think that I can just polish it, it looks pretty good.

    So I came across this DuPont Imron paint which supposed to be Da Bomb in DIY paint jobs.

    Does it still exist?
    Can they put it in cans or do I need a spray nozzle?

    Fanks. :)
     
    Tags:


  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,936
    Likes Received:
    1,031
    I had a Harley painted with Imron and I didn't like it. The paint was soft and easily surface-scratched. It's also nasty shit that should be used with an air-fed mask or a really good filter mask. If it is inhaled and hardens in the lungs...breathing gets difficult. Painting one bike might not be so much of a health risk as a car, but it is a polymer and plastic coating the inside of your lungs is something I would not recommend.

    No clue if Imron or Imron Elite is still around. It was never intended to be a finish for cars or motorcycles. It was an industrial coating. It had superior durability to spilled fuel (Think: drunk motor bikers at a gas station) and that's why we used to use it on gas tanks and fenders.

    Edit: It was a two-part mix. I doubt they ever put it in a spray cam. The hardener would render it useless pretty quickly. We used it in base coat/clear coat format.
     
  3. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    10,529
    Likes Received:
    289
    Yes it still exists and is very durable. It is expensive and you would probably end up buying a lot more than you need for a bike frame, like a gallon. The downside of the paint is that it is thick and you need to use it at a higher temperature to get a good smooth coating. There are newer paints that will work well and are easier to use. I am not aware of availability in spay cans but I doubt it.
    BTW: You will need a notarized written excuse to explain your absence.
     
  4. Volnix

    Volnix Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2011
    Messages:
    2,883
    Likes Received:
    139

    I will bring a note from my Drug-Dealer. :D

    Fanks! :)

    Some notes:

    It was supposed to be a marine coating... But if it's so nasty maybe I should just skip it altogether.

    I don't think it's ready available in cans either and had no idea that it's a two ingredient (hate those things, from glues to metal products).

    Some shops here fill up cans with your desired pigmentation, so I thought that maybe they could load up some with Imron but... Again no point if it's two ingredient...

    Any other super shinny metallic paints?


    Don't care for powder coating.

    I was thinking Orange Metallic. Glitter is a plus! :D

    Or maybe one of these Green-Purple color changing ones.

    I was thinking doing it with spray cans actually... 1*primer, 2-3*coating, 1*clear coat. Yeay or Ney?

    100 EUR they want for a wet paint job here (gotta love how that sounds :D )


    *Peugeot PH11 actually.
     
    #4 Volnix, May 12, 2016
    Last edited: May 12, 2016
Loading...