Dura 10 Chain

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Thatch, May 26, 2004.

  1. Thatch

    Thatch New Member

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    I live here in the USA, I put appriximately 300 to 400 mile a week on my new BIKE. However; I have read several publication stating, "The chain should be replaced every 1500-1800 mile." If that is true, I wil be replacing my chain every other month. I use a chain checker and it is still in limits after 2000 mile. Any advise? Or dose anyone else run the Dura 10 groupo have the same info?:D
     
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  2. dorian

    dorian New Member

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    There are many factors that affect chain life. As long as the chain is within specs it is fine to ride as many miles as it will give you.
     
  3. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    I agree with Dorian. A truly awful failure might involve the chain failing unexpectedly, but generally, you'd see signs that it was wearing before problems arose.
     
  4. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Agree this arbitrary milepoint is low for most of us. IMO, chains should be replaced by the wear measurement, not by miles.

    I use a Park CC-3 checker, with the 0.75% and 1% go/no-go gauges. My SRAM PC-99 chain with 2200 miles isn't worn to 0.75% yet, or even showing measureable wear against a steel ruler over 12 inches. Will be interesting to see how long it goes.
     
  5. lokstah

    lokstah New Member

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    As soon as someone has a wear and tear story with a DA10 chain, say so. It'd be nice to get some data out there regarding how many miles folks are squeezing out.
     
  6. Thatch

    Thatch New Member

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    dhk, I used a chainchecker. I found, I had stretched the chain approximately 1/16th in. I have approximately 2.5k miles on the chain now. I did replace it. The thing that I had noticed is on certain hard stomp drills, it would jump a tooth once in a while.
    It felt like the chain wasn't set after a shift. I double checked the
    chain rings and cogg allinment, everthing is in line. The spring
    tension on the rear derailleur is strong.

    The other question for debait is. I use white lightening a parafin
    wax base chain lubricant. Could this be a factor? Or am I reaching for the stars.:D
     
  7. boudreaux

    boudreaux New Member

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    WL sux.Try prolink.
     
  8. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    I use white lightening a parafin
    wax base chain lubricant. Could this be a factor? Or am I reaching for the stars.:D [/B][/QUOTE]

    Check out this article on chain care and lubrication:

    <http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8d.2.html>

    " Paraffin (canning wax), although clean, works poorly because it is not mobile and cannot replenish the bearing surfaces once it has been displaced."

    " Motor oil is far better, but motorcycle chain and chainsaw lubricants are better yet, because they have volatile solvents that allow good penetration for their relatively viscous lubricant. "

    After reading this article, I switched to Chainsaw Bar and Chain lubricant, with very good chain life and cleaning 4 times during the 5,000 miles of chain life. The 1 quart container that I bought should be more than a lifetime's supply... if I don't buy a chainsaw.
     
  9. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Check out this article on chain care and lubrication:

    <http://draco.acs.uci.edu/rbfaq/FAQ/8d.2.html>

    " Paraffin (canning wax), although clean, works poorly because it is not mobile and cannot replenish the bearing surfaces once it has been displaced."

    " Motor oil is far better, but motorcycle chain and chainsaw lubricants are better yet, because they have volatile solvents that allow good penetration for their relatively viscous lubricant. "

    After reading this article, I switched to Chainsaw Bar and Chain lubricant, with very good chain life and cleaning 4 times during the 5,000 miles of chain life. The 1 quart container that I bought should be more than a lifetime's supply... if I don't buy a chainsaw. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Agree wax isn't the best lubricant. I've tried Sears Chainsaw Oil from the gallon jug, but it's too viscous and sticky for me, and seems to make a mess. Maybe another brand is thinner.

    Concerning the link, disagree with the writer that the chain should always be removed for soaking in solvent. Have done this before, but believe it's unnecessary, and may do more harm than good, by flushing grit from the surface of the chain into the bushings. My theory is that in normal operation, external grit isn't going to migrate into the bushings anyway, and that fresh lube applied to the bushings forces out any grit between the side plates along with the old lube as it flows out.
     
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