Durability of ceramic bearings?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mike Jacoubowsky, May 28, 2008.

  1. We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    that don't get too many miles etc.

    Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    something ought to last for awhile.

    So what are others seeing? Thanks-

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > that don't get too many miles etc.
    >
    > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > something ought to last for awhile.
    >
    > So what are others seeing? Thanks-
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA



    Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    Regular steel bearings were fine.

    Magilla
     
  3. > Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    > Regular steel bearings were fine.
    >
    > Magilla


    Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic bearings don't
    deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at all to use them in a
    wheel.

    --Mike Jacoubowsky
    Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReaction.com
    Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA


    "MagillaGorilla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >
    >> We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all
    >> that durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's
    >> not an issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes &
    >> wheels that don't get too many miles etc.
    >>
    >> Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy
    >> operation after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me,
    >> for $200, something ought to last for awhile.
    >>
    >> So what are others seeing? Thanks-
    >>
    >> --Mike Jacoubowsky
    >> Chain Reaction Bicycles
    >> www.ChainReaction.com
    >> Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    >
    >
    > Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    > Regular steel bearings were fine.
    >
    > Magilla
     
  4. "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:31p%[email protected]:

    >> Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom
    >> bracket/wheels? Regular steel bearings were fine.
    >>
    >> Magilla

    >
    > Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    > theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic bearings
    > don't deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at all to use
    > them in a wheel.
    >


    Don't they color coordinate with Assos clothing better than steel?

    --
    Bill Asher
     
  5. On May 29, 9:08 am, William Asher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote innews:31p%[email protected]:
    >
    > >> Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom
    > >> bracket/wheels? Regular steel bearings were fine.

    >
    > >> Magilla

    >
    > > Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    > > theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic bearings
    > > don't deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at all to use
    > > them in a wheel.

    >
    > Don't they color coordinate with Assos clothing better than steel?
    >
    > --
    > Bill Asher


    They could just sell the sticker for $200, then nobody has to get
    their hands dirty.

    Joseph
     
  6. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    >>Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    >>Regular steel bearings were fine.
    >>
    >>Magilla

    >
    >
    > Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    > theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic bearings don't
    > deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at all to use them in a
    > wheel.
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
    >



    I honestly don't think ceramic bearings are harder or smoother than
    steel. That grittiness you feel is those bearings breaking down under load.

    Magilla
     
  7. [email protected] wrote:

    > On May 29, 9:08 am, William Asher <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> innews:31p%j.2594$jI5.6

    > [email protected]:
    >>
    >> >> Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom
    >> >> bracket/wheels? Regular steel bearings were fine.

    >>
    >> >> Magilla

    >>
    >> > Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    >> > theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic
    >> > bearings don't deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at
    >> > all to use them in a wheel.

    >>
    >> Don't they color coordinate with Assos clothing better than steel?
    >>

    >
    > They could just sell the sticker for $200, then nobody has to get
    > their hands dirty.


    Could I make money by custom installing the sticker for $350?

    --
    Bill Asher
     
  8. On May 29, 11:04 am, William Asher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > On May 29, 9:08 am, William Asher <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote
    > >> innews:31p%j.2594$jI5.6

    > > [email protected]:

    >
    > >> >> Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom
    > >> >> bracket/wheels? Regular steel bearings were fine.

    >
    > >> >> Magilla

    >
    > >> > Pretty much in complete agreement with you on that one. There's a
    > >> > theoretical advantage for the bottom bracket (because ceramic
    > >> > bearings don't deform under pressure), but virtually no reason at
    > >> > all to use them in a wheel.

    >
    > >> Don't they color coordinate with Assos clothing better than steel?

    >
    > > They could just sell the sticker for $200, then nobody has to get
    > > their hands dirty.

    >
    > Could I make money by custom installing the sticker for $350?
    >
    > --
    > Bill Asher


    You could if you were the only one who had the "special" adhesive.

    tf
     
  9. Scott

    Scott Guest

    On May 28, 5:16 pm, MagillaGorilla <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > > that don't get too many miles etc.

    >
    > > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > > something ought to last for awhile.

    >
    > > So what are others seeing?  Thanks-

    >
    > > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > >www.ChainReaction.com
    > > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    >
    > Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    >    Regular steel bearings were fine.
    >
    > Magilla- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Yes, but ceramic bearings are laterally stiff and vertically compliant.
     
  10. billb

    billb Guest

    On May 30, 12:20 am, Scott <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On May 28, 5:16 pm, MagillaGorilla <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > > > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > > > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > > > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > > > that don't get too many miles etc.

    >
    > > > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > > > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > > > something ought to last for awhile.

    >
    > > > So what are others seeing?  Thanks-

    >
    > > > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > > > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > > >www.ChainReaction.com
    > > > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    >
    > > Why would you pay $200 for ceramic bearings in a bottom bracket/wheels?
    > >    Regular steel bearings were fine.

    >
    > > Magilla- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Yes, but ceramic bearings are laterally stiff and vertically compliant.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Sounds like a failing male member.
    Best,
    Bill Black
     
  11. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > that don't get too many miles etc.
    >
    > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > something ought to last for awhile.
    >
    > So what are others seeing? Thanks-
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA



    One of the reason you've been taken in by ceramic bearings is because
    you've also been taken in by riders who claim they weren't doping.

    You're gullible and you don't realize that people in this sport will lie
    to make money - whether it's cyclists or companies.

    Stop swallowing.


    Take care,

    Magilla
     
  12. On May 28, 11:00 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > that don't get too many miles etc.
    >
    > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > something ought to last for awhile.
    >
    > So what are others seeing?  Thanks-
    >
    > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReaction.com
    > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA


    Agree Mike. We sell few(like 2 or 3 pulleys) but have installed more
    than a couple, brought in by customers. First, the 'action' of these
    don't seem any smoother, better than 'normal' BBs, pulleys and hubs
    after installed. In the hand test reveal the same, they don't feel any
    different. After little use, they seem to get gritty quickly, perhaps
    by poor/reduced sealing to try to make them 'feel' smoother when used.
    What is amazing is the $ some people have spent for these and the hype
    presented by some online cycling websites about what an amazing
    upgrade these 'are'. Real world doesn't seem to match the 'news' of
    these.
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]m>,
    "Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On May 28, 11:00 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    > > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > > that don't get too many miles etc.
    > >
    > > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > > something ought to last for awhile.
    > >
    > > So what are others seeing?  Thanks-
    > >
    > > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > > Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReaction.com
    > > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    >
    > Agree Mike. We sell few(like 2 or 3 pulleys) but have installed more
    > than a couple, brought in by customers. First, the 'action' of these
    > don't seem any smoother, better than 'normal' BBs, pulleys and hubs
    > after installed. In the hand test reveal the same, they don't feel any
    > different. After little use, they seem to get gritty quickly, perhaps
    > by poor/reduced sealing to try to make them 'feel' smoother when used.
    > What is amazing is the $ some people have spent for these and the hype
    > presented by some online cycling websites about what an amazing
    > upgrade these 'are'. Real world doesn't seem to match the 'news' of
    > these.


    I wonder about how they'd really work as a derailleur pulley for another reason:
    the upper one (at least on Campy) has some side-to-side float built into it. The
    ceramic bearing ones don't. I think you'd have to have the spacing on the gears and
    the derailleur adjustment perfect with the ceramic pulleys or any (alleged) gains
    from the nifty bearings would be nullified by the chain scrub.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Whatever happened to
    Leon Trotsky?
    He got an icepick
    That made his ears burn.

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. On May 30, 8:29 pm, Howard Kveck <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]m>,
    >  "Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On May 28, 11:00 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > > > We've been seeing increasing evidence of ceramic bearings not being all that
    > > > durable. Just wondering if others are experiencing this, or if it's not an
    > > > issue because ceramic bearings are only going onto "race" bikes & wheels
    > > > that don't get too many miles etc.

    >
    > > > Cracked cases (in full-ceramic, not hybrid) and generally crunchy operation
    > > > after not all that many miles seems relatively common. To me, for $200,
    > > > something ought to last for awhile.

    >
    > > > So what are others seeing?  Thanks-

    >
    > > > --Mike Jacoubowsky
    > > > Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReaction.com
    > > > Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA

    >
    > > Agree Mike. We sell few(like 2 or 3 pulleys) but have installed more
    > > than a couple, brought in by customers. First, the 'action' of these
    > > don't seem any smoother, better than 'normal' BBs, pulleys and hubs
    > > after installed. In the hand test reveal the same, they don't feel any
    > > different. After little use, they seem to get gritty quickly, perhaps
    > > by poor/reduced sealing to try to make them 'feel' smoother when used.
    > > What is amazing is the $ some people have spent for these and the hype
    > > presented by some online cycling websites about what an amazing
    > > upgrade these 'are'. Real world doesn't seem to match the 'news' of
    > > these.

    >
    >    I wonder about how they'd really work as a derailleur pulley for another reason:
    > the upper one (at least on Campy) has some side-to-side float built into it. The
    > ceramic bearing ones don't. I think you'd have to have the spacing on the gears and
    > the derailleur adjustment perfect with the ceramic pulleys or any (alleged) gains
    > from the nifty bearings would be nullified by the chain scrub.
    >
    > --
    >                               tanx,
    >                                Howard
    >
    >                         Whatever happened to
    >                         Leon Trotsky?
    >                         He got an icepick
    >                         That made his ears burn.
    >
    >                      remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?


    Agree. Float on index systems is essential.
     
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