Durable bike for a 6"5 400 pound guy

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by llmercll, Apr 27, 2011.

  1. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    Like the title says, I'm looking for a bike that will support my weight and height. I'm a big guy, but am losing weight at a steady rate. Even still, I will probably be in the 300's for the next few years and would like a good bike. Nothing offroad or anything, mostly just sidewalks and streets. and I need a huge comfortable seat =p

    Price is very important, I'd like to not spend more than $300. I'd love to get a cheapo bike from walmart but doubt they would last long with my size.

    thanks!
     
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  2. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    I was going to say to consult your LBS until I saw your line about price. I doubt that your LBS would have a bike anywhere close to $300. Most steel and aluminum bike frames will support a lot of weight with the major limitting factor being the spoke count of the wheels. Heavier riders need more spokes in their wheels and the spokes need to have a standard lacing pattern such as cross 3. Radial lacing and decorative lacing usually is not strong enough to support much weight.

    To be honest, if $300 is set in stone, your best bet would be to buy a Walmart MTB and then set aside a little money for wheel repairs.
     
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  3. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    hmm, is there a particular brand or model you could recommend me?

    thanks!
     
  4. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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  5. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    Not getting many replies here =(

    I ended up buying a barely used trek 7200 for $275.

    what do you guys think?
     
  6. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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    The Trek 7200 is a good bike, what year model is it?
     
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  7. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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  8. 64Paramount

    64Paramount Active Member

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  9. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    I wonder why the 2009 model has an MSRP of $100 more, and the 2000 model is only worth slightly less. Has the 2008 model proven to be inferior or something? =/

    I should have no issues with my weight right? I got the XL model, which should be great for my size. Also I'm wondering if standover height refers to the groin or the dingleberries. If I was a woman I would be able to standover no problem, but my male belongings might touch, it's a close call. Does that matter?

    thanks!
     
  10. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    The Manufactuter's Suggested Retail Price on Bikepedia is what the bike manufaturer was suggesting that the retailers charge for that bike when they sold it. It is in no way applicable to what the price would be today. Things that could effect the MSRP of identicle bicycles between years is changes in tarriffs, changes in taxes, changes in the price of metals, changes in the price of fuel, etc. In 2008, the price of metals skyrocketed which is probably the reason that the 2009 MSRP was so much higher than the MSRP of the 2008. By the time the price of metal went up, the materials for the 2008 production run was allready purchased. The US economy in 2000 was much healthier and some of the components used on the bike were a little higher end. The biggest thing was that Japan, where most of the components on this bike were made back then, was coming out of their own recession and they were experiencing inflation which drove up the price of the components.

    If your male belongings touch but aren't crunched, you should be OK. If they do crunch, there are only three options, get a new smaller bike, wear platform shoes while cycling, or get a sex change operation.
     
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  11. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    Wow, thats some good information, thanks =)

    Will bike shorts help "suppress" my male parts? If that makes any sense =p
     
  12. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Active Member

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    Standover height isn't important. Seat positioning is what matters.

    The rules of thumb are as follows:

    Make sure your seat is level. I use a level on mine to make sure it's right.

    For seat fore / aft: put your foot at the 3:00 position with the ball of your foot on the pedal and drop a plumbline from the front of your knee (from just below your kneecap). This should just about intersect the pedal spindle.

    For seat height: ride the bike so it's moving. Put your heels on the pedals and turn them that way. When you have the correct seat height your legs should go fully straight at their maximum extension - without you wobbling your hips from side to side to maintain contact. That way, when you put your feet on the pedals your legs will more or less have the correct bend. Note that ideally you want the balls of your feet over the pedal spindles.

    You can then tweak the fit from here depending on what you like. If you don't get the seat height right you can hurt your knees.

    I would put some toe clips on your pedals - I wouldn't have them tight but they help position your feet so they don't slide around.

    Bike shorts are a good idea - they are comfortable - that's why people wear them.

    Make sure you have a helmet - I seen lots of guys crash and destroy their helmets.

    I would put a bike computer on there if you don't already have one. These are very cheap and they'll tell you how fast you're going and how far you've gone. I feel a bit lost when mine isn't working.

    Try to ride as much as you can. You will find it very difficult going at first because you are so out of shape so don't overdo it or you will put yourself off if it hurts too much. Just don't let that get you down - if you keep at it (and watch your diet as well) the pounds will drop off and your body will adapt to the workload. This time next year (assuming you keep at it) you'll be a lot faster and a lot fitter and you'll be able to go longer distances. So much so that you'll be wondering why is was initially so hard.

    Good luck to you.
     
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  13. kdelong

    kdelong Well-Known Member

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by llmercll .

    Wow, thats some good information, thanks =)

    Will bike shorts help "suppress" my male parts? If that makes any sense =p

    Cycling shorts will keep them pressed up against your body rather than hanging if that is what you mean.

    Yojimbo, I am not disputing that seat positioning is critical to fit, but if you cannot straddle the bike without crushing your sensitive bits, then you cannot successfully ride that bike and need to get a smaller frame.
     
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  14. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    I've read that for cycling, the inseam is the measurement from your pubic bone to the floor. Thats almost 38" for me, which is more than enough. But from the bottom of my scrotum it's only about 35", which only gives me half an inch. I'm 6"5 and these measurements are with shoes.

    Either way, my balls are only going to have half an inch of clearance at best. I suppose that's better than having 3 and half inches though, right? because then the bike would be much too small then possibly a little big?
     
  15. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Active Member

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    What are you talking about? Standover height? I just told you that's not important and I also just told you how to properly set up your seat height.

    And stop worrying about your balls - they're nothing special even though they are to you.
     
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  16. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    I've been reading that fit is extremely important and want to be sure it's good for my size. I don't want a bike that's too big =/

    It's the XL (25) size, does that look about right for me at 6"5 with about a 37" inseam (using the book spine method in socks)?

    http://www.trekbikes.com/int/en/bikes/town/recreation/hybrid/7200_e#/int/en/model/fit_sizing?url=int/en/bikes/town/recreation/hybrid/7200_e



    I don't want to crush them =/ I guess I won't though. At most they would be touching a bit.

    thanks!
     
  17. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Active Member

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    I can't comment on the bike size. There's a lot more to fit than getting the right frame size. After you get it, it has to be adjusted to fit your body. Go back and read my first post to find out what's important.

    And guess what, every male rider has balls and none are crushed while cycling. Why are you so fixated on this?
     
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  18. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    I guess it's not so much a fear that they will be crushed, but moreso a fear that if the stand-over is too high, it could mean other parts might be off, and the bike could be the wrong size for me. I don't want my $300 investment being the wrong size, and as a result having safety or comfort issues. But I really don't know, and since I'm buying it used and not from a LBS, it hasn't be professionally fitted to me, and that makes me a little paranoid.

    That's why I'd appreciate an experienced bikers opinion on whether or not, judging by what you know about me and the bike measurements, if the XL should be a good fit, after being properly adjusted.

    thanks a lot, I appreciate the help =)
     
  19. Yojimbo_

    Yojimbo_ Active Member

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    Well, all I can say on that is - you're a big guy and you've got the XL frame so there's not much else you can do.

    Time to stop worrying about it and go riding.
     
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  20. llmercll

    llmercll New Member

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    Ok, thanks a lot!

    I can't wait to go riding. I just need to get a date from the seller to pick it up =)
     
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