E.R. DK Iron Cross Pedals.

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Dave W, Feb 28, 2003.

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  1. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    Finally got around to adding these puppies to my rig....

    http://pricepoint.com/product1031.html

    and let me just say, they rock. Very grippy, lightweight, sealed bearings....

    one drawback are the non-removable pins, but they seem to be installed very firmly. Hopefully
    they'll hold up.

    Dave
     
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  2. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Dave W wrote:
    > Finally got around to adding these puppies to my rig....
    >
    > http://pricepoint.com/product1031.html
    >
    > and let me just say, they rock. Very grippy, lightweight, sealed bearings....

    I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    originals weighed a ton. The reason for this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent
    breakage when the pedal hits coping - not something particularly needed in mtb :)

    > one drawback are the non-removable pins, but they seem to be installed very firmly. Hopefully
    > they'll hold up.

    Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  3. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    On Fri, 28 Feb 2003 10:16:45 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dave W wrote:
    >> Finally got around to adding these puppies to my rig....
    >>
    >> http://pricepoint.com/product1031.html
    >>
    >> and let me just say, they rock. Very grippy, lightweight, sealed bearings....
    >
    >I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    >originals weighed a ton.

    What were the originals made of, alum, steel? Granted they aren't as light as the POS I took off the
    bike. But light enough for my application. I was looking for a flat that was a little more
    beefier....

    The reason for
    >this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent breakage when the pedal hits coping -
    >not something particularly needed in mtb :)

    I rarely have "pedal to coping" placement issues. But when I do, better the pedal taking the hit
    then the bottom of my foot. I would think technique plays a large part in the above scenario.
    >
    >> one drawback are the non-removable pins, but they seem to be installed very firmly. Hopefully
    >> they'll hold up.
    >
    >Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    >some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.

    Well realistically, you begin with a certain diameter hole, slam the original pins in, which would
    of course be of a slightly larger diameter than said hole, now if it "worked" itself out, said hole
    would probably be rounded to a slightly larger than began with diameter. This would mean you would
    have to smack a slightly larger than original pin back in, no? And actually, the ones that can be
    accessed THROUGH the pedal openings have tiny phillips head screws holding them in from the
    underside. Although there are but a few per side that can be accessed like this. I think a threaded
    "set screw" design would be much better in this application, but hey, for 40.00 bucks they were
    worth a shot.

    Dave (excellent query Bomba)

    hey talking about mountain bikes in a mountain bike newsgroup.....

    well whoda thunk it?
     
  4. Dave W wrote in message ...
    >On Fri, 28 Feb 2003 10:16:45 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Dave W wrote:
    >>> Finally got around to adding these puppies to my rig....
    >>>
    >>> http://pricepoint.com/product1031.html
    >>>
    >>> and let me just say, they rock. Very grippy, lightweight, sealed bearings....
    >>
    >>I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    >>originals weighed a ton.
    >
    >What were the originals made of, alum, steel? Granted they aren't as light as the POS I took off
    >the bike. But light enough for my application. I was looking for a flat that was a little more
    >beefier....
    >
    > The reason for
    >>this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent breakage when the pedal hits coping -
    >>not something particularly needed in mtb :)
    >
    >I rarely have "pedal to coping" placement issues. But when I do, better the pedal taking the hit
    >then the bottom of my foot. I would think technique plays a large part in the above scenario.
    >>
    >>> one drawback are the non-removable pins, but they seem to be installed very firmly. Hopefully
    >>> they'll hold up.
    >>
    >>Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    >>some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.
    >
    >Well realistically, you begin with a certain diameter hole, slam the original pins in, which would
    >of course be of a slightly larger diameter than said hole, now if it "worked" itself out, said hole
    >would probably be rounded to a slightly larger than began with diameter. This would mean you would
    >have to smack a slightly larger than original pin back in, no? And actually, the ones that can be
    >accessed THROUGH the pedal openings have tiny phillips head screws holding them in from the
    >underside. Although there are but a few per side that can be accessed like this. I think a threaded
    >"set screw" design would be much better in this application, but hey, for 40.00 bucks they were
    >worth a shot.
    >
    >Dave (excellent query Bomba)
    >
    >hey talking about mountain bikes in a mountain bike newsgroup.....
    >
    >well whoda thunk it?

    Err well no, actually you're talking about a BMX pedal, designed as Bomba pointed out, to cope with
    smacking your pedal when attempting to grind / stall on a coping etc.

    Still no harm in using them on an mtb, if you smack you're pedals a lot on rocks etc then I guess
    they will work for that too. I don't want to discourage anyone who shuns the devils pedals.........

    Steve E.
     
  5. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    On Fri, 28 Feb 2003 14:17:59 -0000, "spademan o---[)*" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Dave W wrote in message ...
    >>On Fri, 28 Feb 2003 10:16:45 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Dave W wrote:
    >>>> Finally got around to adding these puppies to my rig....
    >>>>
    >>>> http://pricepoint.com/product1031.html
    >>>>
    >>>> and let me just say, they rock. Very grippy, lightweight, sealed bearings....
    >>>
    >>>I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    >>>originals weighed a ton.
    >>
    >>What were the originals made of, alum, steel? Granted they aren't as light as the POS I took off
    >>the bike. But light enough for my application. I was looking for a flat that was a little more
    >>beefier....
    >>
    >> The reason for
    >>>this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent breakage when the pedal hits coping -
    >>>not something particularly needed in mtb :)
    >>
    >>I rarely have "pedal to coping" placement issues. But when I do, better the pedal taking the hit
    >>then the bottom of my foot. I would think technique plays a large part in the above scenario.
    >>>
    >>>> one drawback are the non-removable pins, but they seem to be installed very firmly. Hopefully
    >>>> they'll hold up.
    >>>
    >>>Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    >>>some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.
    >>
    >>Well realistically, you begin with a certain diameter hole, slam the original pins in, which would
    >>of course be of a slightly larger diameter than said hole, now if it "worked" itself out, said
    >>hole would probably be rounded to a slightly larger than began with diameter. This would mean you
    >>would have to smack a slightly larger than original pin back in, no? And actually, the ones that
    >>can be accessed THROUGH the pedal openings have tiny phillips head screws holding them in from the
    >>underside. Although there are but a few per side that can be accessed like this. I think a
    >>threaded "set screw" design would be much better in this application, but hey, for 40.00 bucks
    >>they were worth a shot.
    >>
    >>Dave (excellent query Bomba)
    >>
    >>hey talking about mountain bikes in a mountain bike newsgroup.....
    >>
    >>well whoda thunk it?
    >
    >Err well no, actually you're talking about a BMX pedal, designed as Bomba pointed out, to cope with
    >smacking your pedal when attempting to grind / stall on a coping etc.

    Good point. I stand corrected. Guess I'm lending more credibility to the "adult-BMX" designation I
    coined last year....

    but i like the bail factor associated with flats....

    >
    >Still no harm in using them on an mtb, if you smack you're pedals a lot on rocks etc then I guess
    >they will work for that too. I don't want to discourage anyone who shuns the devils pedals.........
    >
    >Steve E.
    >

    Works pretty good so far. And what are the devils pedals? clipless? or worse....toeclips?

    Dave (SATAN? TELL HIM TO CALL BACK LATER...)
     
  6. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Dave W wrote:

    >>I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    >>originals weighed a ton.
    >
    >
    > What were the originals made of, alum, steel?

    Alu.

    Granted they aren't as
    > light as the POS I took off the bike. But light enough for my application. I was looking for a
    > flat that was a little more beefier....

    Furry muff.

    >
    > The reason for
    >
    >>this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent breakage when the pedal hits coping -
    >>not something particularly needed in mtb :)
    >
    >
    > I rarely have "pedal to coping" placement issues. But when I do, better the pedal taking the hit
    > then the bottom of my foot.

    You ride bmx?

    I would
    > think technique plays a large part in the above scenario.

    A bit, but usually it's the rear peg slipping off in feeble grinds.

    >>Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    >>some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.
    >
    >
    > Well realistically, you begin with a certain diameter hole, slam the original pins in, which would
    > of course be of a slightly larger diameter than said hole, now if it "worked" itself out, said
    > hole would probably be rounded to a slightly larger than began with diameter. This would mean you
    > would have to smack a slightly larger than original pin back in, no?

    Yep. The replacement pins I got with my Primo Super Tenderisers are slightly larger at the bottom,
    and knurled too. I figure by the time you've gone through the first batch of replacements, it will
    be time to replace the pedal anyway.

    And actually, the ones that can be
    > accessed THROUGH the pedal openings have tiny phillips head screws holding them in from the
    > underside. Although there are but a few per side that can be accessed like this. I think a
    > threaded "set screw" design would be much better in this application, but hey, for 40.00 bucks
    > they were worth a shot.

    I will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices. I
    will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices.

    > Dave (excellent query Bomba)
    >
    > hey talking about mountain bikes in a mountain bike newsgroup.....
    >
    > well whoda thunk it?

    Bizarre...

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  7. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Dave W wrote:

    >>Err well no, actually you're talking about a BMX pedal, designed as Bomba pointed out, to cope
    >>with smacking your pedal when attempting to grind / stall on a coping etc.
    >
    >
    > Good point. I stand corrected. Guess I'm lending more credibility to the "adult-BMX" designation I
    > coined last year....
    >
    > but i like the bail factor associated with flats....

    I've never had a problem with bailing from the 'devil's pedals', except for when I was first
    learning (~10 years ago).

    >>Still no harm in using them on an mtb, if you smack you're pedals a lot on rocks etc then I guess
    >>they will work for that too. I don't want to discourage anyone who shuns the devils
    >>pedals.........

    Come to the dark side, Steve. You know it to be your destiny };)

    >
    > Works pretty good so far. And what are the devils pedals? clipless? or worse....toeclips?

    Steve, like myself has a background in bmx. Tragically for Steve, he can not let go of his roots and
    take advantage of clipless, like the rest of the mtb community. He may claim that they are evil, and
    spawn of the devil, but in reality, it's all just a cover for the fact that he's scared. Like the
    big pussy that he is ;)

    (Incidentally, clipless has no business in bmx.)

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  8. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    On Fri, 28 Feb 2003 15:37:08 +0100, bomba <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dave W wrote:
    >
    >>>I'm surprised you said 'lightweight'. I realise that they're the magnesium versions, but the
    >>>originals weighed a ton.
    >>
    >>
    >> What were the originals made of, alum, steel?
    >
    >Alu.
    >
    >Granted they aren't as
    >> light as the POS I took off the bike. But light enough for my application. I was looking for a
    >> flat that was a little more beefier....
    >
    >Furry muff.

    yeah, but I like em shaved!

    >
    >>
    >> The reason for
    >>
    >>>this is the extra material between the surfaces to prevent breakage when the pedal hits coping -
    >>>not something particularly needed in mtb :)
    >>
    >>
    >> I rarely have "pedal to coping" placement issues. But when I do, better the pedal taking the hit
    >> then the bottom of my foot.
    >
    >You ride bmx?

    don't we all? Seriously, not like an indoor park or anything. All my riding is out doors, and for
    pure out jumping, ya can't go wrong riding a bmx course can ya? Grinding, and stalls are what I used
    to do on my skateboard, my bike traveled a little bit further, and was expected to do much more than
    silly park tricks!

    >
    >I would
    >> think technique plays a large part in the above scenario.
    >
    >A bit, but usually it's the rear peg slipping off in feeble grinds.

    again more silly park tricks that I feel were better served on my

    sometimes.

    >
    >>>Did they not come with a spare set of pins? Even with pedals like this, there's often a bag with
    >>>some replacements that can just be banged in with a hammer.
    >>
    >>
    >> Well realistically, you begin with a certain diameter hole, slam the original pins in, which
    >> would of course be of a slightly larger diameter than said hole, now if it "worked" itself out,
    >> said hole would probably be rounded to a slightly larger than began with diameter. This would
    >> mean you would have to smack a slightly larger than original pin back in, no?
    >
    >Yep. The replacement pins I got with my Primo Super Tenderisers are slightly larger at the bottom,
    >and knurled too. I figure by the time you've gone through the first batch of replacements, it will
    >be time to replace the pedal anyway.

    there ya go then. This was my first thought after checking em' out for the first time. I bet I can
    find a needle roller bearing I could use in the event I need to replace. Besides almost 3 years on
    my previous POS Wellgos was enough.

    >
    >And actually, the ones that can be
    >> accessed THROUGH the pedal openings have tiny phillips head screws holding them in from the
    >> underside. Although there are but a few per side that can be accessed like this. I think a
    >> threaded "set screw" design would be much better in this application, but hey, for 40.00 bucks
    >> they were worth a shot.
    >
    >I will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices.
    >I will not moan about US prices. I will not moan about US prices.

    What cha talking bout Wilis?

    >
    >> Dave (excellent query Bomba)
    >>
    >> hey talking about mountain bikes in a mountain bike newsgroup.....
    >>
    >> well whoda thunk it?
    >
    >Bizarre...

    What talking about mtb related subjects, or just talking about them
    w/ME?

    Dave
     
  9. >Come to the dark side, Steve. You know it to be your destiny };)
    >
    >>
    >> Works pretty good so far. And what are the devils pedals? clipless? or worse....toeclips?

    Clipless

    >Steve, like myself has a background in bmx. Tragically for Steve, he can not let go of his roots
    >and take advantage of clipless, like the rest of the mtb community.

    Oi! I've served my time, honest guv. Started off with a set of onza H.O.'s. They were fantastic. For
    about a week. Then my foot started to come flying off an unexpected times and trying to clip back in
    was 'experimental'. Moved to a set of the early XT's which weighed a ton, and refused to unclip
    after they saw a bit of mud. They might have been alright for a sourthern softy but show 'em some
    proper Northern weather and they gave up quicker than a Frenchman at a fireworks party. After this I
    bought some Time ATAC's which compared to the previous two were the dogs danglies. I got on pretty
    well with these until I realised that I wasn't having as much fun on my MTB as I did on my BMX, I
    felt restricted by the pedals and reluctant to trust in something mechanical to hold my feet in when
    I would rather rely on technique. So now I run flat pedals on all my bikes, I can wear whatever
    shoes I like and know that if something goes fubar my ankle won't be snapped in two...

    but hey, I'm a reasonable man, you're entitled to hold an incorrect opinion if you want..

    Steve E.

    >(Incidentally, clipless has no business in bmx.)

    I can't believe people even consider racing BMX with clipless pedals, its just Wrong.
     
  10. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    spademan o---[)* wrote:

    >>Steve, like myself has a background in bmx. Tragically for Steve, he can not let go of his roots
    >>and take advantage of clipless, like the rest of the mtb community.
    >
    >
    > Oi! I've served my time, honest guv. Started off with a set of onza H.O.'s. They were fantastic.
    > For about a week. Then my foot started to come flying off an unexpected times and trying to clip
    > back in was 'experimental'.

    Onza HO's - another addition to the crap parts museum. Elastomer springs? Pfft.

    Moved
    > to a set of the early XT's which weighed a ton, and refused to unclip after they saw a bit of mud.
    > They might have been alright for a sourthern softy but show 'em some proper Northern weather and
    > they gave up quicker than a Frenchman at a fireworks party.

    Hehe - nice metaphor. Double action, weren't they? I had the cheaper ones, and I seem to remember
    them being ok. All pedals clog anyway.

    After this I bought some Time ATAC's which
    > compared to the previous two were the dogs danglies. I got on pretty well with these until I
    > realised that I wasn't having as much fun on my MTB as I did on my BMX, I felt restricted by the
    > pedals and reluctant to trust in something mechanical to hold my feet in when I would rather rely
    > on technique.

    I can see why that might be an issue for dh racing, but surely the advantages outweigh the
    disadvantages for normal trails riding. Still each to their own...

    So now I run flat pedals on all my bikes, I can wear whatever
    > shoes I like and know that if something goes fubar my ankle won't be snapped in two...

    Now you're just exaggerating.

    > but hey, I'm a reasonable man, you're entitled to hold an incorrect opinion if you want..

    Ok :)

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  11. Shaun Rimmer

    Shaun Rimmer Guest

    bomba <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > spademan o---[)* wrote:

    > Moved
    > > to a set of the early XT's which weighed a ton, and refused to unclip
    after
    > > they saw a bit of mud. They might have been alright for a sourthern
    softy
    > > but show 'em some proper Northern weather and they gave up quicker than
    a
    > > Frenchman at a fireworks party.
    >
    > Hehe - nice metaphor.

    heh - I agree....

    > So now I run flat pedals on all my bikes, I can wear whatever
    > > shoes I like and know that if something goes fubar my ankle won't be
    snapped
    > > in two...
    >
    > Now you're just exaggerating.

    You'd think! Shortly after I started hanging here, a guy posted a picture of what happened to his
    shin bone when he wiped out and his foot stayed clipped
    in. There was a huge spiral fracture nearly the whole length of it. The picture was of his x-ray,
    and it showed the whole mess, including thew two plates and many screws they'd put him back
    together with.

    Just thought I'd mention that ',;~}

    Shaun aRe
     
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