Early electrical CVT



On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:43:21 -0700, [email protected] may have
said:

>http://www.google.com/patents?id=U5hJAAAAEBAJ&pg=PP1&dq=598819#PPP1


Ah, but if I read a couple of the paragraphs correctly, he expressly
disclaimed patent on the CVT possibility of the invention, noting that
the methods of achieving this via the addition of any of a number of
devices to his invention was well known. It was the fundamental idea
of the generator/motor system itself that he was patenting.



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On 05 Feb 2008 18:58:50 GMT, nmp <[email protected]> wrote:

>carlfogel wrote:
>
>> http://www.google.com/patents?id=U5hJAAAAEBAJ&pg=PP1&dq=598819#PPP1
>>
>> Somehow I doubt that Steinmetz was consulted.

>
>The system reminds me of <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_electric>
>
>The bike in the patent could have worked to an extent, I guess. Worked in
>the sense that the thing would perhaps have moved forward. A little.
>
>What exactly would Steinmetz have said?


Dear NMP,

Among other things, Steinmetz did considerable work in power
transformers. Edison favored direct current, which just won't work for
powering your home--Steinmetz worked out much of the stuff that gives
us 3-phase alternating current.

Unlike the primarily practical Edison, Steinmetz was a mathematical
genius, who worked out what's often known as Steinmetz's law:

"When Stephen Field, nephew of Cyrus Field of Atlantic Cable fame,
approached Eickenmeyer with a proposal to run trolley cars by
electricity using alternating current, Steinmetz was called upon. When
the transfer from direct current to alternating current was made,
there was a slight delay, slight, but long enough to cause the motor
to overheat. Working in Eickenmeyer’s laboratory and at his residence
at 124 Waverly Street in Yonkers, Steinmetz solved the problem
mathematically and his solution became known as the 'Law of
Hysteresis' or 'Steinmetz’s Law.'"
http://www.yonkershistory.org/stein.html

So I imagine that Steinmetz, who knew a lot about electrical power
transmission, might have looked at the odd bicycle transmission and
said something about the impressive power losses involved in replacing
a simple and incredibly efficient bicycle chain between two sprockets
with a pair of pulleys and two electric motor/generators.

Even a hand-cranked generator for an old field radio gets a lot hotter
than a leg-cranked bicycle chain, which suggests the kind of power
losses involved.

A nice Steinmetz site, with some details of the law of hysteresis. It
shows him rubbing shoulders with Kelvin, Einstein, Marconi, and
Edison:
http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/history/steinmetz.html

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
 
carlfogel wrote:

> On 05 Feb 2008 18:58:50 GMT, nmp <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>carlfogel wrote:
>>
>>> http://www.google.com/patents?id=U5hJAAAAEBAJ&pg=PP1&dq=598819#PPP1
>>>
>>> Somehow I doubt that Steinmetz was consulted.

>>
>>The system reminds me of <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diesel_electric>
>>
>>The bike in the patent could have worked to an extent, I guess. Worked
>>in the sense that the thing would perhaps have moved forward. A little.
>>
>>What exactly would Steinmetz have said?


[..]

> So I imagine that Steinmetz, who knew a lot about electrical power
> transmission, might have looked at the odd bicycle transmission and said
> something about the impressive power losses involved in replacing a
> simple and incredibly efficient bicycle chain between two sprockets with
> a pair of pulleys and two electric motor/generators.
>
> Even a hand-cranked generator for an old field radio gets a lot hotter
> than a leg-cranked bicycle chain, which suggests the kind of power
> losses involved.


Well, this I understand. That thing looks terribly ineffcient of course.
Those belt drives alone! I thought you meant that Steinmetz would have
said something even more learned and profound, but I guess he just
promoted common sense ;)

> A nice Steinmetz site, with some details of the law of hysteresis. It
> shows him rubbing shoulders with Kelvin, Einstein, Marconi, and Edison:
> http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/history/steinmetz.html


That looks like a nice biography, doesn't it. I did find it myself after
I read your post, it comes up high in the Google results for Steinmetz.

Remarkable genius and a nice person too, so it seems.
 
"clare at snyder.on.ca" wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Mon, 04 Feb 2008 12:43:21 -0700, [email protected] wrote:
>
>>http://www.google.com/patents?id=U5hJAAAAEBAJ&pg=PP1&dq=598819#PPP1
>>
>>Somehow I doubt that Steinmetz was consulted.
>>
>>Cheers,
>>
>>Carl Fogel

> What is missing is a variable field control on one end or the other to
> make it a "true" CVT
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>


Somehow, I am reminded of Walter Westinghouse's climax:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topsy_the_Elephant

--
Dave Reckoning
Noblesville, Indiana
 

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