Easto EC 70 Seat Post

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Graham, Jan 22, 2003.

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  1. Graham

    Graham Guest

    I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream Plus
    and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The instructions say no grease on a carbon
    post but this would surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post slipping
    cos of the tight fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit of grease on ?

    TIA

    Graham
     
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  2. Ian S

    Ian S Guest

    "Graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream
    > Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The instructions say no grease on a
    > carbon post but this would surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post
    > slipping cos of the tight fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit of grease on ?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Graham

    I wouldn't do it. Prolonged contact of a composite material - such as your carbon seatpost - with
    the components of grease could degrade the physical properties of the composite. A safer bet would
    perhaps be a dry lubricant like graphite powder, the kind that comes in a small squeeze tube. Avoid
    anything with aerosols and solvents.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, Graham <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream Plus
    >and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The instructions say no grease on a carbon
    >post but this would surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post slipping
    >cos of the tight fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit of grease on ?

    Is the seatpost too big, or is the seat tube too small? If the latter, the the correct fix is to
    ream the seat tube to the proper size. That will ensure proper fit with this seatpost and all future
    ones as well.

    If the seatpost is larger than it should be, it is defective. Do not ream a frame to accept a
    seatpost that is a little larger than spec, unless you want to keep that seatpost forever or ream
    your frame larger still at some future date.

    If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are responsible for proper frame prep
    when they sell it and they should be delighted to have you back in the store asking to have the seat
    tube done properly.

    If the mfr says don't grease the post, I wouldn't. Whether or not it hurts the post, it will
    probably destroy the warranty since the grease will be obvious if you end up sending it in for
    any reason.

    --Paul
     
  4. GTgelliott-<< I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a
    Colnago Dream Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. >><BR><BR>

    MUST prep these framesets that include at least a flexhone in the seattube. Colnagos are on the top
    of my list of framesets that need prepping...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Ian S" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post.
    I
    > > have a Colnago Dream Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The
    > > instructions say no grease on a carbon post but this
    would
    > > surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post slipping cos of the tight
    > > fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit
    of
    > > grease on ?
    > >
    > > TIA
    > >
    > > Graham
    >
    > I wouldn't do it. Prolonged contact of a composite material - such as your carbon seatpost - with
    > the components of grease could degrade the physical properties of the composite. A safer bet would
    > perhaps be a dry lubricant like graphite powder, the kind that comes in a small squeeze tube.
    > Avoid anything with aerosols and solvents.
    >
    >
    Ok, thanks for the advice Ian, I'll guess I'll just have to be content with a tight fitting post.

    Graham
     
  6. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Paul Southworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:OoHU9.29608$A%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Graham <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream
    > >Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The instructions say no grease on a
    > >carbon post but this would surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post
    > >slipping cos of the tight fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit
    of
    > >grease on ?
    >
    > Is the seatpost too big, or is the seat tube too small? If the latter, the the correct fix is to
    > ream the seat tube to the proper size. That will ensure proper fit with this seatpost and all
    > future ones as well.
    >
    > If the seatpost is larger than it should be, it is defective. Do not ream a frame to accept a
    > seatpost that is a little larger than spec, unless you want to keep that seatpost forever or ream
    > your frame larger still at some future date.
    >
    > If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are responsible for proper frame prep
    > when they sell it and they should be delighted to have you back in the store asking to have the
    > seat tube done properly.
    >
    > If the mfr says don't grease the post, I wouldn't. Whether or not it hurts the post, it will
    > probably destroy the warranty since the grease will be obvious if you end up sending it in for
    > any reason.
    >
    > --Paul

    Thanks Paul, I should mention that I already have had three or four different seatposts in this
    frame, all 27.2 mm diameter. So the Easton post is seemingly just a tight fitting 27.2. It's not
    as if it didn't go in, it was just a bit of a squeeze !

    Graham
     
  7. Graham

    Graham Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > GTgelliott-<< I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a
    > Colnago Dream Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. >><BR><BR>
    >
    >
    > MUST prep these framesets that include at least a flexhone in the
    seattube.
    > Colnagos are on the top of my list of framesets that need prepping...
    >
    > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"

    What is a flexhone ?

    Graham
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, Graham <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Thanks Paul, I should mention that I already have had three or four different seatposts in this
    > frame, all 27.2 mm diameter. So the Easton post is seemingly just a tight fitting 27.2. It's not
    > as if it didn't go in, it was just a bit of a squeeze !

    I would be comparing those seatposts with a caliper to see how they differ. It is also possible that
    the bottom edge of the Easton post is enlarged a little where the carbon was cut. I think it's
    worthwhile to ask Easton what they think of it, if the post is really too large.

    --Paul
     
  9. Glhudson1

    Glhudson1 Guest

    >If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are responsible for
    proper frame prep when they sell it

    just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of the frame.
    anyone have any ideas on why that is?

    thanks, gary
     
  10. Paul-<< If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are responsible for proper frame
    prep when they sell it and they should be delighted to have you back in the store asking to have the
    seat tube done properly.

    ANY retailer worth it's grasso should prep every frameset that leaves their establishment. Some of
    the 'garage operations' certainly don't do this. But a decent bike shop should.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  11. glhudson-<< just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of
    the frame. anyone have any ideas on why that is?

    Good question but we would rather that most not prep the frameset as many seem to not really know
    how to do it properly.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    >I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the above-mentioned seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream Plus
    >and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post. The instructions say no grease on a carbon
    >post but this would surely help it slide in a bit better. There is no chance of the post slipping
    >cos of the tight fit. So what is the thought on slapping a bit of grease on ?

    Take your frame to your LBS and ask them to ream it out to the proper size. Expensive frame does not
    always mean well prepped frame.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  13. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (Glhudson1) wrote:

    > just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of the frame.
    > anyone have any ideas on why that is?

    Moreover, I wonder why it seems to be just European (and often swanky) manufacturers who are
    exempted from finishing their products?

    A thorough retailer like Vecchio's might do facing and reaming on a USA-, Japan-, or Taiwan-made
    frame, but in my experience it is never necessary with frames from those countries of origin.

    But even a Huffy is likely to have better faces and bores than a French, Italian, or English frame
    from the factory. Pretty sad, really.

    Chalo Colina "what's Italian for junk?"
     
  14. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > >If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are
    responsible for
    > proper frame prep when they sell it

    From: "Glhudson1" <[email protected]>
    > just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of the frame.
    > anyone have any ideas on why that is?

    Because the dealer is the defacto quality control station for manufacturers, who cannot seem to (or
    will not) manage that function in-house.

    I recall when new car prep was similarly daunting, involving a lot of work and care. Auto
    manufacturers have taken an aggressive stance there, and deliver a more uniform product now than
    they did thirty years ago ( not that they are perfect, but generally cars are now driveable when
    delivered to the dealership, unlike bicycles).

    In the case of a premium frameset, the dealer should measure threads and bores, correct as necessary
    and check alignment before sale. Many small errors are righted on nearly every unit. No other
    industry would stand for that level of error, IMHO. Can you imagine if every electronic device at
    Radio Shack needed dealer prep?? Or a bookstore gluing bindings on new books?

    It gets worse. On mass-produced bicycles ($350up) a skilled mechanic spends over an hour adding
    lubricant to dry bearings, trimming,cable lengths, tightening BB in frame, tensioning wheels,
    mounting tires straight, esentially redoing every aspect of factory assembly. And all out of the
    margin of a pretty cheap thing!

    Dealers have the choice to whine about it, ignore the issue ( which shorts the customer) or just
    suck it up and cover for sloppy manufacturing practice. And none of this will change any time soon.

    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  15. Goofy looking item with abrasive balls on springy stalks that goes in a drill; hones out the inner
    surface of cylinders of all sorts (as well as other applications) . Check out
    http://www.flex-hone.com/ for examples.

    SB

    "Graham" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > GTgelliott-<< I'm looking for fitting advice regarding the
    above-mentioned
    > > seat-post. I have a Colnago Dream Plus and I find that it is a tight fit with this seat-post.
    > > >><BR><BR>
    > >
    > >
    > > MUST prep these framesets that include at least a flexhone in the
    > seattube.
    > > Colnagos are on the top of my list of framesets that need prepping...
    > >
    > > Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    > > (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
    >
    > What is a flexhone ?
    >
    > Graham
     
  16. An anonymous AOLer asked:

    >>If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are responsible for
    >
    > proper frame prep when they sell it
    >
    > just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of the frame.
    > anyone have any ideas on why that is?

    My understanding is that this is a particular tradition in the Italian bicycle industry. Most
    Italian pro shops have frame prep tools and take great pride in their ability to use them.

    Reportedly the Italian retailers prefer to have the frames shipped semi-finished so they can do the
    final prep themselves.

    High-quality frames from the U.S. and Asia rarely need major work, they're generally built to higher
    standards of precision, on the assumption that the dealer should not have to chase threads, face
    mounting surfaces and the like. That's not to say that they sometimes don't need these services.

    Sheldon "Don't Cut Metal Unless You Need To" Brown
    +--------------------------------------------------------------+
    | I think there is a world market for maybe five computers. | -- Thomas Watson, Chairman of IBM,
    | 1943 |
    +--------------------------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton,
    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  17. Bluto

    Bluto Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote:

    ...> we must see different USA made framesets.
    > Specialized and Cannondale are two that come to mind that always need to be prepped.

    The only bare frames I've dealt with from either of these mfgrs are the handful of frame-only or
    replacement C'dales I have had in my own stable. That's not many, like five altogether. But they've
    all worked fine without finish machining.

    > AND any Taiwan made frameset of any level-they just don't do prepping.

    Maybe we mean different things by "prepping". I refer to facing and reaming HT, ST, and BB shell,
    chasing BB threads, and aligning rear DOs. If an ordinary HS, post, and BB install in a frame
    without undue difficulty or noticeable resistance when rotated by hand, and the wheels go in
    straight with no monkey business, then I don't know why any of this must be done. As a machinist, I
    refrain from further material removal once a workpiece meets spec.

    Occasionally I run across a fussy seat post bore, but most often this has to do with the binder and
    slot rather than the bore itself. If it was bending that closed the opening, I'll bend it back open
    rather than ream.

    > Pretty untrue also-I think that perhaps your experience with bare frames(like we get, only
    > framesets, no complete bikes in boxes) is limited.

    You are correct. As a bike wrench I was never one of the "old hands" who did the piecemeal builds.
    My experience with factory frame prep or lack of it stems directly with new complete bikes, and from
    my own framesets.

    > I have seen good, bad or no prepping on framesets from every country that makes them. The best is
    > Torelli/Mondonico.

    I never paid much attention to those frames, since I'm out of their weight class, but their
    reputation in the business is enviable. Their relationship with my LBS is so close and frequent that
    I had assumed they were an Italo-American company.

    > The worse I have seen is probably Cannondale. But they vary.

    I guess so-- since my experience has been that they require no further attention.

    > And I will say again, any 'Pro' shop worth it's salt will prep framesets, even on complete bikes.
    > It saves money in the long run...

    I'll have to take your word for it. The 4 different shops I worked for only did finish machining on
    known problem frames. And, of course, on bare European frames, which looked to me like they fit the
    former category.

    Chalo Colina lube and tighten thoroughly, align-bore only as necessary
     
  18. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > >If you got a Colnago Dream Plus from a retail dealer, they are
    > responsible for
    > > proper frame prep when they sell it
    >
    > From: "Glhudson1" <[email protected]>
    > > just curious why the retailer is responsible for frame prep and not the manufacturer of the
    > > frame. anyone have any ideas on why that is?
    >
    > Because the dealer is the defacto quality control station for
    manufacturers,
    > who cannot seem to (or will not) manage that function in-house.
    >
    > I recall when new car prep was similarly daunting, involving a lot of work and care. Auto
    > manufacturers have taken an aggressive stance there, and deliver a more uniform product now than
    > they did thirty years ago ( not
    that
    > they are perfect, but generally cars are now driveable when delivered to
    the
    > dealership, unlike bicycles).
    >
    > In the case of a premium frameset, the dealer should measure threads and bores, correct as
    > necessary and check alignment before sale. Many small errors are righted on nearly every unit. No
    > other industry would stand for that level of error, IMHO. Can you imagine if every electronic
    > device at Radio Shack needed dealer prep?? Or a bookstore gluing bindings on new books?
    >
    > It gets worse. On mass-produced bicycles ($350up) a skilled mechanic
    spends
    > over an hour adding lubricant to dry bearings, trimming,cable lengths, tightening BB in frame,
    > tensioning wheels, mounting tires straight, esentially redoing every aspect of factory assembly.
    > And all out of the margin of a pretty cheap thing!
    >
    > Dealers have the choice to whine about it, ignore the issue ( which shorts the customer) or
    > just suck it up and cover for sloppy manufacturing practice. And none of this will change any
    > time soon.
    >
    > Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971

    This is why I like selling titanium frames. When's the last time you chased and faced one of
    those?

    Robin Hubert
     
  19. On Thu, 16 Jan 2003, Sheldon Brown wrote:
    > My understanding is that this is a particular tradition in the Italian bicycle industry. Most
    > Italian pro shops have frame prep tools and take great pride in their ability to use them.

    Any good shop does have such tools, and it is considered normal to be able to use them. The pride is
    in having been able to pay Campagnolo so much for them.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  20. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    -snip frame prep woes-

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > This is why I like selling titanium frames. When's the last time you chased and faced one of
    > those?

    Yesterday afternoon. And I did have to take out material from the BB threads to get a cup in.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
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