'Easy Fit' tube question



Has anyone tried those Halfords type 'Easy Fit' (length of tube sealed
at either end) inner tubes?

I was considering using one on my hub geared rear wheel to save too
much faffing.

Are they up to MTB use?

Cheers.
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Has anyone tried those Halfords type 'Easy Fit' (length of tube sealed
> at either end) inner tubes?
>
> I was considering using one on my hub geared rear wheel to save too
> much faffing.
>
> Are they up to MTB use?


I got one cheap via eBay out of curiosity, tried it and it seemed to work.
MTBing would bother it. However it won't necessarily be the best tube for
you, and I wouldn't use them ordinarily. Choice of sizes are limited,
they're not lightweight, and the overlapping bit is heavier than the rest
(not that's very important for bicycle wheels to be balanced).

Rapid tube changes can be made as you don't have to take the wheel off,
but they're not quicker or easier to use once the wheel is off. One would
be particularly useful for someone who's not skilled or prepared to remove
a wheel. Nutted axles don't help, and rear hub-gear wheels are horrible
in this way. Most punctures can be fixed without changing a tube but
that's not /always/ possible or desirable.

~PB
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
I scribbled:
> I got one cheap via eBay out of curiosity, tried it and it seemed to
> work. MTBing would bother it.


SORRY, I meant MTBing *wouldn't* bother it. Air pressure keeps it in
place, and it flexes and compresses just like any other tube.

~PB
 
Cheers Pete! Will have a think! I suppose I'm concerned about it moving
around. I want to avoid fiddling with the adjustment of my hub gear as
much as possible!

How come you didn't get on with them Sandy?
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Pete Biggs wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>> Has anyone tried those Halfords type 'Easy Fit' (length of tube sealed
>> at either end) inner tubes?
>>
>> I was considering using one on my hub geared rear wheel to save too
>> much faffing.
>>
>> Are they up to MTB use?

>
> I got one cheap via eBay out of curiosity, tried it and it seemed to work.
> MTBing would bother it. However it won't necessarily be the best tube for
> you, and I wouldn't use them ordinarily. Choice of sizes are limited,
> they're not lightweight, and the overlapping bit is heavier than the rest
> (not that's very important for bicycle wheels to be balanced).
>
> Rapid tube changes can be made as you don't have to take the wheel off,
> but they're not quicker or easier to use once the wheel is off. One would
> be particularly useful for someone who's not skilled or prepared to remove
> a wheel. Nutted axles don't help, and rear hub-gear wheels are horrible
> in this way. Most punctures can be fixed without changing a tube but
> that's not /always/ possible or desirable.
>


Even quicker is to drill another valve hole opposite the original and
put a second uninflated tube in the tyre. If you get a flat, let the
inflated tube down and inflate the other one. Doesn't work if you have
a thorn that's gone through both of them though ;-(


--
Tony

"The best way I know of to win an argument is to start by being in the
right."
- Lord Hailsham
 
T

TrailRat

Guest
I work for Halfords and I wouldn't sell them. They're ideal for
emergency pit stops for when your in a hurry on the road or trail but
otherwise avoid them. We've had to return them to suppliers because of
the ends coming undone.

That's my opinion not Halfords. Halfords say buy, buy, buy.

TR
 
T

TrailRat

Guest
I work for Halfords and I wouldn't sell them. They're ideal for
emergency pit stops for when your in a hurry on the road or trail but
otherwise avoid them. We've had to return them to suppliers because of
the ends coming undone.

That's my opinion not Halfords. Halfords say buy, buy, buy.

TR
 
T

TrailRat

Guest
OOOOOOpppppppsss, so thats what happens if you hit the refresh button.
Sorry about the repeated reply.

TR
 
Thanks for your opinions everyone!

I particulary liked the double up inner tube idea. You could even put
three or four in there!

I think I might give them a miss. I did see some on the St.John Street
Cycles website called Sidewinders, don't know if they're as bad as the
Halfords ones!

Have to practise removing and replacing my hub geared back wheel!!

Happy Christmas!

Nick
 
N

Naqerj

Guest
[email protected] wrote:

> Have to practise removing and replacing my hub geared back wheel!!
>


What hub is it? When I had the Shimano Nexus 7 in its original Dawes
frame, it was possible to take the wheel out and leave the gear cable
still connected. Unhooking the hub brake cable from the hub and
unclipping the gear cable from the frame clips was enough for changing a
tyre or tube. Now I've put it into a different frame, I can't do it
that way but it's still quite easy to unhook the gear cable from the
hub, do what I have to do, and hook it back up again without disturbing
the adjustment.

--
Andrew
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Thanks for your opinions everyone!
>
> I particulary liked the double up inner tube idea. You could even put
> three or four in there!


Genius! :)

> I think I might give them a miss. I did see some on the St.John Street
> Cycles website called Sidewinders, don't know if they're as bad as the
> Halfords ones!


That's the one I got via from SJS when they were flogging them cheap via
eBay. They described it as "Sidewinder" but it was in a Halfrauds box.
99p + post iirc. It's *not* bad... for an emergency. Forgot to mention
you'll need scissors to remove the old (ordinary) tube! ...which will be
wasted.

> Have to practise removing and replacing my hub geared back wheel!!


Also practise attending to tube without removing wheel or whole tyre (to
fix a puncture).

> Happy Christmas!


And have a pumped-up one yourself.

~PB
 

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